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Old 01-18-2011, 12:58 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,827 posts, read 21,130,434 times
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Central Kentucky's horse farm region looks a lot like England or Ireland. (Saying that might get you in trouble though because the area is overwhelmingly of Scottish origin ): )

(yes mods, I took these pictures myself)





We even have a castle!

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Old 01-18-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Your best bet is the north-east.

Otherwise you won't get anything like the climate of England. For visuals only anywhere in the northern Piedmont (say, Virginia to New Jersey) region would also do.
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Old 01-18-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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Pacific Northwest is alot like England
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Old 01-18-2011, 06:46 PM
 
Location: High Point NC
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I may sound biased because I currently live here, but having been to England, I would say that the western piedmont of North Carolina can look quite like the scenery of the English countryside. Especially around my home, we have rolling hills with farms dotting the landscape and small villages and large towns intermingled. Also North Carolina has a significant population of people with British backgrounds, mainly Scots-Irish, but also many English as well, stretching back to the earliest settlers. Old Salem in Winston Salem, while Moravian, does also give you that old world feel as well. Climate-wise, however, North Carolina can be much more extreme, to the East it is generally much warmer year round, and in the high elevations to the west it is possibly cooler.
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Old 01-18-2011, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
Pacific Northwest is alot like England
More like Scotland.
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Old 01-18-2011, 09:20 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EpicEast View Post
I may sound biased because I currently live here, but having been to England, I would say that the western piedmont of North Carolina can look quite like the scenery of the English countryside. Especially around my home, we have rolling hills with farms dotting the landscape and small villages and large towns intermingled. Also North Carolina has a significant population of people with British backgrounds, mainly Scots-Irish, but also many English as well, stretching back to the earliest settlers. Old Salem in Winston Salem, while Moravian, does also give you that old world feel as well. Climate-wise, however, North Carolina can be much more extreme, to the East it is generally much warmer year round, and in the high elevations to the west it is possibly cooler.
No, your not being biased. Your actually on to something and that is England is much more open countryside and farmland compared to the forested parts of America and Canada. I was actually thinking of parts of Virginia and North Carolina myself.

Also, Censusdata is right about the open parts of Kentucky. I believe the Queen even visited the Bluegrass region at one time.

Possibly the most English like area in the Northeast might be the Hudson Valley. Its kind of ironic because the valley was orginially settled by the Dutch but it was later taken over by the English. There are mansions and large estates left by the Roosevelts, Livingstons, Van Burens, Vanderbilts, Rockerfellers, Van Cortlands etc. Dense NY type villages. Large areas of open farmland are preserved to provide views of the river and the distant mountains. Also there is a significant number of colonial stone buildings left in the valley.

Last edited by LINative; 01-18-2011 at 09:39 PM.. Reason: Added Kentucky.
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Lake District, United Kingdom
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I joined this forum a couple of days ago and this topic has fascinated me. I reside in the UK but have visited New England, Alaska, Oregon, Washington, Virginia, and California.
As for which areas resemble England the most I would agree that the New England villages share a similarity to England itself, but the long cold winters really don't belong to a English landscape (although winter in the UK has been quite cold this year, unusually so). Also, the warm and hot summers of the Eastern Half of the United States don't give a very good feel for the English countryside. We British do have some warm days but in general summers are between 15 to 30 degrees on average (aka 60 - 75 degrees).
Oregon's Willamette valley doesn't quite remind me of Southern England but it does bear a resemblance to the Lake District of Northern England which is a mountainous part of the UK. The Willamette Valley also has an Oceanic climate like the UK though a bit warmer.
I should also mention that the Pacific Northwest gardens look more like English gardens then on the East Coast of the U.S.. Cool summer flowering species (foxglove, fuchsias, and others) flourish all summer in the UK just as they do in the PN, at least in gardens I have visited.
I hope I have helped,
~ Julia
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:24 PM
 
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The east coast islands and peninsulas have somewhat milder climates and a very historic English feel. Sea cliffs too. Eastern Long Island (Hamptons), Block Island, Aquidneck Island, Martha's Vineyard, Cape Cod.
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Old 01-18-2011, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The New England states, more than any other region. Massachussetts and Connecticut especially.
I grew up in Mass and I agree with you here however I think the winters are more harsh in New England then in England, unless you are talking about the Northern areas. When I was in England I preferred the Southern parts, near the seacoast.
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Old 01-20-2011, 05:39 PM
 
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I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Maryland, and few have mentioned Virginia. Maryland and Northern Virginia are some of the most prototypically English areas of the US - and this is coming from someone whose spent more years in New England than I care to recall.

Maryland and Virginia have a number of towns that are architecturally frozen in Georgian English time. And, the more mild, verdant climate is more like England than any of the five New England states [plus Connecticut - just kidding before someone jumps all over me! :-)]
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