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Old 01-20-2011, 07:19 PM
 
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Although it's not USA: http://www.victoria.ca is often mentioned as very English. It's the provincial capital, and a ferry ride away from Washington state.
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Old 01-21-2011, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
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It rains a lot in England, right? I tend to envision England having the same climate as the Pacific NW, but maybe with more snow (although the EASTERN parts of Oregon and Washington have a lot more snow).

I agree with Greene45 about the Willamette Valley, although it's more spacious. I have friends who live just outside of London, and they said that even the countryside there is gettting crowded.
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Old 01-21-2011, 12:40 PM
 
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The New England states may have looked more like England in Thoreau's time (1830s-50s) than they do today. The biggest difference is reforestation: very little of the N. E. landscape is open fields any more; it's mostly reforested (farmers moved west, gave up farming, settled in cities, etc). England has little forest and lots of grazing land. English villages and towns are way more dense than anything in New England-- In England and many other countries you can't just build a strip mall or put up a subdivision wherever you want, as you can in the U. S. Sprawl-type development is all over southern New England and some of northern, and that's another big reason why it looks very unlike England, where there's a lot more land use regulation.
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missionhill View Post
The New England states may have looked more like England in Thoreau's time (1830s-50s) than they do today. The biggest difference is reforestation: very little of the N. E. landscape is open fields any more; it's mostly reforested (farmers moved west, gave up farming, settled in cities, etc). England has little forest and lots of grazing land. English villages and towns are way more dense than anything in New England-- In England and many other countries you can't just build a strip mall or put up a subdivision wherever you want, as you can in the U. S. Sprawl-type development is all over southern New England and some of northern, and that's another big reason why it looks very unlike England, where there's a lot more land use regulation.
Very true and I will add that the architecture seems pretty different between New England and "Old" England, lol. And not just NE, but its different in the former English colonies of the South --- Virgnia and the Carolinas.

One major difference is that in the eastern United States, most of the older buildings are made out of wood. Wood was extremely available in the wilderness of the colonies. England in contrast, has more of a mixture of wood and stone, probably because wood is a bit rarer.

For example, there is a dramatic difference between the large stone churches that dominate even small English cities and towns and the classic white wooden churches of New England. Not to mention, we do not have any thatched cottages. The only place I have seem them in the USA is in Jamestown, VA and they were new.
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Old 01-23-2011, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Originally Posted by missionhill View Post
The New England states may have looked more like England in Thoreau's time (1830s-50s) than they do today. The biggest difference is reforestation: very little of the N. E. landscape is open fields any more; it's mostly reforested (farmers moved west, gave up farming, settled in cities, etc). England has little forest and lots of grazing land. English villages and towns are way more dense than anything in New England-- In England and many other countries you can't just build a strip mall or put up a subdivision wherever you want, as you can in the U. S. Sprawl-type development is all over southern New England and some of northern, and that's another big reason why it looks very unlike England, where there's a lot more land use regulation.
Never thought of that. It's true. The NE has become rather heavily forested again (and I personally love it).

Except where in NY and PA it was never actually de-forested. Hard to build in the Appalachians I guess. XD

I guess in that sense would the eastern Mid-west be more like England?
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Old 01-23-2011, 01:07 PM
 
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While not in the US, I would say Nova Scotia reminds me of parts of England.
novascotia.com - Photos
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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Originally Posted by LINative View Post

Also, Censusdata is right about the open parts of Kentucky. I believe the Queen even visited the Bluegrass region at one time.
Yes, she was here a couple years ago to watch the Kentucky Derby and she stayed at a horse farm in Versailles, Ky.

Central Ky horse farms region looks very very much like the English countryside.
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Old 02-05-2011, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Altoona, PA
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You need to head to one of the New England states, particularly Massachusetts or Maine. Boston is probably the most "British-like" city I've seen outside of the United Kingdom. Also, many towns in Massachusetts have the same "feel" as English towns, even if the architecture is somewhat different (more wood, less brick).

Also, Fall River is an old mill town and very much resembles the mill towns in northern England. In fact, the resemblance is quite uncanny and surreal to either someone like me who has been to England many times, or to an English person who may find "home" abroad.

People in Massachusetts are quite similarly reserved, although generally more brash than the English (just my opinion). Culturally, a New Englander wouldn't be out of place in England, or vice-versa (aside from the differences in sports preference).
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cacto View Post
The culture of Boston and New England is louder and pushier than England. The people of the Pacific Northwest actually are similar in their attitudes and ways. Very literate, somewhat reserved, more worldly.

Also, the climate type for both regions is the same, Marine West Coast. Mild winters with frequent rain, sunny summers.
This is very interesting, because it reveals a lack of understanding of the people in England. The comment rests on the stereotype - that they are literate, reserved, and worldly. However, like all countries, England has a large number of poorly-educated people. There are plenty of people who have never left their tiny villages, or their rough and tumble cities, and plenty of loud people. You can't use the stereotypical reserved upperclass Brit to make comparisons to people in the US. Also, on the whole, New Englanders are as literate and "worldly" as people from the Pacific Northwest - perhaps more so, given their excellent colleges and universities, and closer proximity to Europe (and therefore significantly lower airfares.)

I have lived in New England most of my life (save for living abroad for a few years) and have travelled to England and the surrounding countries numerous times. I agree that the Pacific Northwest climate is closer to that of England... New England has greater temperature extremes, although at times - especially wet summers - it is similar to England. But, you can't just look at climate - you have to look at architecture and culture too. I'd say Boston and Portsmouth, NH are quite close in architecture and culture (meaning the same array of cultural elements you'd find in England, not just the upper crust) to urban England. Rural NH in some areas is quite similar to rural England, and coastal Maine is similar to coastal England. I would say, though, (and no wonder) the Atlantic provinces of Canada are even more similar. Regarding architecture... it's true that in the country, most of the oldest structures are wood. But in cities, as in English cities, much of the old architecture is brick or stone. I was very recently in London, and it really does seem quite similar to the cities I'm used to in New England, just on a much larger scale. Of course there are differences, but nowhere in the US outside of the northeast have I found anything as close.

Regarding forest vs. fields... the reforestation issue is important. But, there are still a number of areas (for instance, near where I currently live in NH) which have small-scale farming, and open fields. We have stone walls, grazing animals, weathered wooden buildings on stone foundations... all look very similar to some of what you will find in rural England. (And, by the way, there ARE forests in England.) That said, we certainly do not have thatch roof houses and some of the other VERY old architecture which exists in England.

Regarding English ancestry... how is this defined? I would venture to say that greater than 50% of New Englanders have some English blood. My last name is Irish and I look Irish and I always identify myself as Irish, but I'm actually only 1/4 Irish. I am 50% English - my mother is 100% English. But I never identify myself in that way.

Also, the ancestry question on the census form is pretty clear about requesting ancestral origin, not current nationality. It says that "ancestry refers to a person's ethnic origin or descent, "roots," or heritage; or the place of birth of the person, the person's parents, or ancestors BEFORE THEIR ARRIVAL IN THE UNITED STATES." In 2000, only about 7% of all responders identified themselves as "American," so I don't think that's throwing off the numbers that much as one poster claimed. But, there were only two lines for ancestry - no room to put more than two. Many people have multiple ancestries, but may not even list two, if they most identify with one of them.

Last edited by cowbell76; 09-28-2011 at 10:39 AM..
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Old 09-28-2011, 07:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The New England states, more than any other region. Massachussetts and Connecticut especially.
Strongly disagree. Actually, they probably resemble England when it was still a forested country, but not anymore. I would say the region that looks most like England does today is the Willamette Valley and parts of Virginia.
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