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Old 09-28-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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New England and the Pacific Northwest
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
New England and the Pacific Northwest
I'd say Climate wise its very similar to the Pacific Northwest. But really the Pacific Northwest is more like Scotland in terms of topography. The only thing England really lacks is really high mountains and large forests like the PNW.
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Old 09-29-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: New England
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Uh, New England. This is a question?

Most who reply against the area, have never been here outside of a foliage tour bus or visiting their 4th cousin on some remote holiday. No place in the United State resembles the English countryside like New England. Period. It's not just a section or area of town...it's a way of life and the way the entire landscape IS.

Also in regard to size, yes from CT/RI up to the Coast of Maine you will find differences, just like you will From Portsmouth England and Glasgow. Which ironically is about the same geographic footprint.

Places like this are not something "special" just one of thousand you'll drive by on any stone wall lined, field strewn state road.

http://photos-c.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sf2p/v103/38/86/3419822/n3419822_34808278_4302.jpg (broken link)
http://photos-a.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-sf2p/v103/38/86/3419822/n3419822_34808284_6163.jpg (broken link)

New England Summer


New England the Beautiful - YouTube

Enough said...

Last edited by JViello; 09-29-2011 at 08:49 AM..
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Looks nothing like England.

I've always accosiated Boston/New England with being very English though. Look at Cambridge, MA for example. Or Manchester, NH. Or NEW York. or Essex, New Jersey or Norfolk, Virginia (not New England I know)
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JViello View Post
Uh, New England. This is a question?

Most who reply against the area, have never been here outside of a foliage tour bus or visiting their 4th cousin on some remote holiday. No place in the United State resembles the English countryside like New England. Period. It's not just a section or area of town...it's a way of life and the way the entire landscape IS.

Also in regard to size, yes from CT/RI up to the Coast of Maine you will find differences, just like you will From Portsmouth England and Glasgow. Which ironically is about the same geographic footprint.

Places like this are not something "special" just one of thousand you'll drive by on any stone wall lined, field strewn state road.
Enough said...
I agree with you that architecturally New England is more like England. However, I am more inclined to think of the Willamette Valley to look and feel like the English countryside than New England.
First of all, harsh snowy blizzardly winters are not typical of England as they are of New England.
Second, like England the W gets LOTS of mist and light rain. Almost all precipitation in these areas is this kind of stuff. New England has more heavy rain and when it stops raining the sun is more likely to come out than it is in the W Valley and England.
Third, here are some pictures to compare:
Typical New England Winter:

Typical English winter:

Typical Willamette Valley winter:

Keep in mind that both the W Valley and England can and do get some snow. But usually it's just cold and rainy in the winter with lots of mist and fog. Notice that both England and W Valley have green in the winter. New England does not.
I think there isn't really quite one place where it's *just* like England in the USA.
Oh...and there are villages in the pacific northwest, see:
Mendocino, California (on the north coast the weather is usually misty, rainy, or foggy):


Mendocino has often been compared to a New England village, except it's way more expensive than most of New England. Average home price is like one million or so . It's also a bit out-of-the-way being fairly far from the nearest big city (San Francisco).
I think we find in both New England and the Pacific Northwest, areas and countrysides that feel like England. Whether it's a New England village or the misty green hills of the Willamette Valley.
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Old 09-29-2011, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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I can say without a doubt, here at least, it is not usually misty and fogy in winter. In England we receive far less rain than the Pacific North West (106 mm in February in Portland compared to 40.8 mm in London).

To be honest, nowhere in the US is anything like England, weatherwise or architecturally.
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Old 09-29-2011, 01:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I can say without a doubt, here at least, it is not usually misty and fogy in winter. In England we receive far less rain than the Pacific North West (106 mm in February in Portland compared to 40.8 mm in London).

To be honest, nowhere in the US is anything like England, weatherwise or architecturally.
I would say climate wise the lowlands of the PNW are very similar to England in terms of the fact that it is a mariatime and heavily influenced by the ocean.

That being said the similiarties end there.

The topography of the PNW (is more like Scandinavia) is much more rugged and forested compared to England.
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Old 09-29-2011, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Definitely older colonial cities like New Haven and Boston come the closest with their older architecture and collegiate campuses, and small New England coastal areas (Old Saybrook, Madison, Milford, Westport, Mystic, Nantucket, Westport, Rockport, Portsmouth, Block Island) have a UK Maritime feel to them.

Also, the northeast has the rolling hills and farms.

So, in short, New England is ironically the closest to Old England you can get in the US.
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Old 09-29-2011, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greene45 View Post
Mendocino has often been compared to a New England village, except it's way more expensive than most of New England.
It's way more expensive than most of the state it's in too.

New England has many towns where average home prices approach or exceed a million. Like most of southwest CT.
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Old 09-29-2011, 01:57 PM
 
22 posts, read 82,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I can say without a doubt, here at least, it is not usually misty and fogy in winter. In England we receive far less rain than the Pacific North West (106 mm in February in Portland compared to 40.8 mm in London).

To be honest, nowhere in the US is anything like England, weatherwise or architecturally.
The North Coast of California has a different climate than the Pacific Northwest. Mendocino is on the California north coast. It IS always foggy and misty there.
The Willamette Valley often has light rain, like the UK. The oceanic climate is characterized by having more light rain than heavy rain. I said more, not always
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