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Old 09-29-2011, 02:30 PM
 
22 posts, read 82,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
It's way more expensive than most of the state it's in too.

New England has many towns where average home prices approach or exceed a million. Like most of southwest CT.
Actually Mendocino is cheap compared to other coastal towns of California. Santa Barbara and Carmel-by-the-Sea are notable examples. I'm not sure whether they're more expensive than CT, though it wouldn't surprise me if they were.
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Old 09-29-2011, 08:20 PM
 
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Culturally and architecturally: NE US
Climate wise: Pac NW
Topography wise: Parts of the Great Lakes and upper Midwest
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Old 09-29-2011, 09:40 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Looks nothing like England.

I've always accosiated Boston/New England with being very English though. Look at Cambridge, MA for example. Or Manchester, NH. Or NEW York. or Essex, New Jersey or Norfolk, Virginia (not New England I know)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I can say without a doubt, here at least, it is not usually misty and fogy in winter. In England we receive far less rain than the Pacific North West (106 mm in February in Portland compared to 40.8 mm in London).

To be honest, nowhere in the US is anything like England, weatherwise or architecturally.
The architecture is different but if you go to some of the older brick row/town house blocks of some of our Northern cities, you can see a distant resemblance to some of the English cities. I am also not sure about the weather comment when you consider the Pacific Northwest?

Overall however, I agree with you. Just because there is a "England" in "New England" does not mean it looks the same, lol. In fact, I am not sure why buildings in the US and the UK are so different. Maybe, like I said on an earlier post, its because of the abundance of trees (for wooden buildings) in the US and also the longer history of fires in medieval cities in England.

Also, your from England so you probably know more what England looks like than the rest of us!
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Old 09-30-2011, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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The Northeast is probably the closest thing you'll get to England in the US...and perhaps the Midwest.
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Old 09-30-2011, 05:56 AM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Overall however, I agree with you. Just because there is a "England" in "New England" does not mean it looks the same, lol.
No need to be condescending.

Perhaps because New England was colonized and built from scratch mostly by the British for a couple hundred years is why you'll see for instance certain building practices from the 16-1700's as a common thread throughout the land. Same for field layout and aspects such as hedgerows and stone walls etc all throughout the land. Unless of course you think those Englishmen were building in a Germanic or Mediterranean style.

The thing about New England is it's not just a neighborhood, or a village or one section of town. It's everywhere. It's the landscape.

Frankly, there is a lot of ignorance in this thread. No snow in the UK? I beg to differ. It does snow as far South as London, but Northern England does get snow regularly and in if you go into the Scottish Highlands, it looks like anything you'll find in Northern New England.



The biggest mistake is thinking all of New England is frozen mountainous tundra. Not even close. Southeastern New England actually has a very temperate climate with average highs in the Winter in the low 40's with average snowfall less than interior Virginia.

Furthermore, whoever posted a ski resort as the topography of New England is only partially correct. Southern New England, (parts of Mass, RI and CT specifically) where the majority of the population is, is actually rolling hills, meadows and small farms. Eastern Mass and the Seacoast of NH are actually pretty dog gone flat.

However, to say the UK is flat is not accurate at all. Central and Northern parts are hilly and mountainous.

Does this look a lot like the CT river valley in New England? Why yes it does. But it's Keswick UK.



I would challenge anyone to walk through downtown Portsmouth NH, Old Port Portland through the cobblestone streets, Newburyport, Mystic, Portsmouth, Nantucket, etc and not see similarities in architecture or to wander the rolling hills of Southern New England and not see similarities.

Anyhow, the UK is a place of varied landscape so saying "where is like England" is a bit like saying "where is like New England" it depends on the point of reference.
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Old 09-30-2011, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 10,318,057 times
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For parts of the year the climate in the South of England tracks pretty closely with the climate here in Delaware. Spring and Autumn temperatures will be quite consistent on either side of the pond. However, it gets hotter here in the summer and colder/snowier in the winter. The marshy coastal plain areas of Delaware somewhat resemble the fens of east Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. I guess I could compare the northernmost appalachian piedmont part of Delaware to areas of Hampshire that I've been through, although I think the comparison might be somewhat stretched. Having lived in England I really can't say there's anywhere in the US that very much resembles England (which is very diverse itself). The central area of Boston, including parts like Beacon Hill, bear some resemblance to urban areas in England (e.g. Hampstead in London). The historic parts of Alexandria, VA and old New Castle, DE also resemble some old, posh urban bits in England, as does Annapolis, MD.
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Old 09-30-2011, 08:34 AM
 
605 posts, read 1,235,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JViello View Post

The thing about New England is it's not just a neighborhood, or a village or one section of town. It's everywhere. It's the landscape.

Frankly, there is a lot of ignorance in this thread. No snow in the UK? I beg to differ. It does snow as far South as London, but Northern England does get snow regularly and in if you go into the Scottish Highlands, it looks like anything you'll find in Northern New England.



The biggest mistake is thinking all of New England is frozen mountainous tundra..

No one is saying that there is no snow in the UK. The UK covers a very large land mass. Overall though the climate of the UK is marine type and not continental and is probably more comparable to the Pacific Northwest in the sense that it has cold wet winters and cool summers. Of course there is variation with altitude and proximity to the water.

As far as topography goes, it probably is more similar to New England in the sense that the UK is not very mountainous compared to the Scandinavian countries of Norway and Sweden. The UK can be hilly in parts but it is pretty low. I would hardly call the Scottish highlands very big mountains. The highest peak in the Scottish Highlands is only 4,000 feet high. So in that sense it might be more similar to the peaks in New England.
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Old 09-30-2011, 08:55 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,232 posts, read 19,531,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
To be honest, nowhere in the US is anything like England, weatherwise or architecturally.
There is no place that is exactly the same. The U.S. and U.K. are very different despite some similarities and shared heritage. But the responses in this thread pretty much cover the closest.
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Old 09-30-2011, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,732 posts, read 23,155,761 times
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Definitely Connecticut, especially away from the NYC metro suburbs in the southwestern part of the state.
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Old 09-30-2011, 12:04 PM
 
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Weather-wise the Pacific Northwest (Seattle - Portland areas) have similar climate to England, although slightly sunnier and slightly warmer in summer than England.

New England region, especially Massachusetts looks like England somewhat, but not really. Check out the city of Worcester, MA.
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