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Old 01-17-2011, 10:01 AM
 
35 posts, read 161,490 times
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I have the opportunity to move to pretty much any region of the USA in a little over a year. The fact that my schedule this year won't allow me to travel makes this decision all the more overwhelming. I basically have to decide based on reading and talking to people. Without getting into too much detail, the only requirement is that there must be a major academic hospital in the area. I would like to narrow my search to a handful of cities so I can concentrate my efforts on learning about each one in more detail. Any and all suggestions welcome. Where should I be looking??

My "wish list":
- warm weather; very little/no snow (although I am considering the NE region because of the diversity, cultural richness, higher number of educated professionals)
- friendly/liberal
- lots of single professionals, 25-35 crowd (especially educated single men )
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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This might help: maps : Who's Your City? by Richard Florida
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Old 01-17-2011, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Arizona
1,034 posts, read 3,871,411 times
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Well, I wouldn't call it liberal per-se, but check out Tucson, AZ. They have a University Medical Center and a wonderful climate. Since they get lots of med students and residents through the school, I'd image their single male population goes up and down with the schedule of internships. Weather can get hot in the summer, but not as bad as Phoenix (I actually escape to Tuscon once in awhile in the summers). Winters are beautiful with snow in close proximity.
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Old 01-17-2011, 08:57 PM
 
21,204 posts, read 30,412,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaches84 View Post
I have the opportunity to move to pretty much any region of the USA in a little over a year. The fact that my schedule this year won't allow me to travel makes this decision all the more overwhelming. I basically have to decide based on reading and talking to people. Without getting into too much detail, the only requirement is that there must be a major academic hospital in the area. I would like to narrow my search to a handful of cities so I can concentrate my efforts on learning about each one in more detail. Any and all suggestions welcome. Where should I be looking??

My "wish list":
- warm weather; very little/no snow (although I am considering the NE region because of the diversity, cultural richness, higher number of educated professionals)
- friendly/liberal
- lots of single professionals, 25-35 crowd (especially educated single men )

Durham/Chapel Hill, NC

Little snow, mild four season climate, a lot of diversity, culturally rich, a highly educated population, friendly, liberal, a lot of younger singles and two major academic hospitals 10 miles apart, both Duke University Medical Center and the UNC Hospitals.

Durham, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chapel Hill, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Location Details - Duke University Hospital - DukeHealth.org
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Old 01-18-2011, 12:56 AM
 
285 posts, read 556,284 times
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Check out the San Francisco Bay area. The climate is mild, its beautiful, its liberal, and there are many highly educated professionals. I cannot imagine a better place for someone from outside the country to spend a year where they can get the mix of bustling urban areas, beautiful parks, mild weather, and top notch cultural amenities.
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Old 01-19-2011, 10:00 AM
 
Location: New York NY
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I'd strongly consider University towns, where you'll find the social life you want in addition to the professional opportunities.

The Research Triangle (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill NC) as someone has already said, stands out for good climate, genreally liberal, friendly and culturally aware, and of course the big teaching hospitals--although Durham itself leaves a bit to be desired I've heard (never been there myself, just to Chapel Hill.) Similarly take a look at Charlettsville, the home of U of Virginia and on a larger scale, Nashville, home to Vanderbilt U. Its a nifty little city, often overlooked with an interesting mix of Southern charm and progressive thought.

I'd also consider Seattle, famously liberal and full of hospitals, and if not always warm, at least not snowy-- and rainy a lot less than popular perception.

In the cold northeast of course there are the usual big centers in the Boston-Washington corridor, but for a smaller, more friendly alternative I'd consider Providence RI, home of Brown U. And in the cold Midwest take a look at Ann Arbor, home of U. Michigan and Madison, home of U Wisconsin, which has the additional advantage of being close to Chicago when you need a big city fix.
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Old 01-20-2011, 08:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
If you go with the Northeast, perhaps the Poughkeepsie area, which has more men and it's proximity to NYC is great. There's also some nice artsy communities like Rhinebeck, New Paltz, Saugerties and Red Hook close or in that area. There are quite a few colleges in that area as well.

Another Northeastern area that might work is Rochester, which also has more men and has quite a few colleges. You would probably like neighborhoods like Park Ave. South Wedge, Swillburg and most of the Monroe Ave. neighborhoods(Monroe Village, Upper Monroe, etc.). It is more white collar and is pretty affordable as well.

Weather might be the only factor for both, but the Poughkeepsie area is going to have less snow.
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