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Old 01-31-2011, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,805,335 times
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I do think Houston will have a strong and nice Inner Loop with a nice level of density in those 95 square miles, but I also do agree that city wide (as in the whole 579 Square Miles) probably wont sustain a density above 7,000 people per square mile or so and even that is being generous.

Holding density of that level is pretty damn near impossible, and very few cities can do that. It shouldn't matter in the end though, Houston will have a improved and more urban (than it is now) Inner Loop, so the city wide density shouldn't affect it much how, because to get that level of density means like 6-8 Million people within city limits and that's just so unreal, and it also means displacing detached single family homes which wont ever pass in the city.

It's no big deal real getting there or not, because that shouldn't be the goal for the city, but its just a very "near" impossible task to sustain.

 
Old 02-01-2011, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,177,183 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
I do think Houston will have a strong and nice Inner Loop with a nice level of density in those 95 square miles, but I also do agree that city wide (as in the whole 579 Square Miles) probably wont sustain a density above 7,000 people per square mile or so and even that is being generous.

Holding density of that level is pretty damn near impossible
That is why we will have some areas with higher density to compensate. The southwest is a good example.

Anywho, I don't think the 7K is too far fetched. That is about where the upper heights is at now, and I don't think the heights zip is crowded.

The upper heights area: Zip code 77009
Population 48,000
Land area 6.2sq miles
Density 7742


Another average density area is Montrose
The population is 22K in 2.2 sq miles, or a a density of 10,000sq miles.

I think the average for Houston will be somewhere between the Heights and Montrose density or about 8500ppsm which averages out to about 4.5M people.

a purely suburban area like Mission Bend supports 82,000 people in 9.8 sq miles. That averages out to a density of 8.4K ppsm I don't see why this will be so hard to reach all over Houston.

In areas where it is mixed suburban (single family homes and apartments) the density spikes higher. 77081 for example has 57K in 3.2 sq miles (18,000 ppsm) which would average out zip codes like 77024 (the memorial villages) with densities closer to 3000ppsm.
 
Old 02-01-2011, 05:46 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,838,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberAzeneth View Post
A hurricane will not impede Houston's growth. It hasn't yet. If you recall Houston was hit with a major hurricane almost 2 1/2 years ago and that did not seem to deter the growth. In fact the city grew even more. More people have migrated here in spite of the hurricanes.
Yeah, a lot of people (especially from the Midwest) saw an opportunity for more work after Hurricane Ike hit, and started moving to Houston in droves.
 
Old 02-02-2011, 05:52 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,171,331 times
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Another way to look the size of areas, on this metric Houston has a long way to go to reach #2

Survey of Buying Power - Media Markets Ranking Report - DMA Current Year Estimate -Total Population - 2009
 
Old 02-02-2011, 05:55 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,171,331 times
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And this link is a five year projection - seems fair to estimate this far

Survey of Buying Power - Media Markets Ranking Report - DMA Five Year Projection -Total Population - 2009
 
Old 02-03-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,771,019 times
Reputation: 8804
That list is crazy...
 
Old 02-03-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,171,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
That list is crazy...

How so, it is basically reflective of a population within close proximity of the center of the city - about 40 or so miles. Metros (MSAs/CSAs) are very different in areas covered or even city borders for that matter. Houston the city covers more than 11 times the land area that Boston does as a city for example. Some metros get cut off only a few miles from the center while others continue to count people 50 or 100 miles away

Just another way to look at population and less reliant on county borders and more reliant on actual proximity. they all serve a purpose. DMA is how advertisers value a particular market, how many people are reached by the local media market.
 
Old 02-03-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,771,019 times
Reputation: 8804
Shreveports metro area estimate is over 1 million while Baton Rouge's is shy of 1 million. That's about a 100% increase in Shreveport versus a 10-15% increase in Baton Rouge. That is why I don't see this list as legitimate, I'm no expert but that just doesn't seem reasonable.
 
Old 02-03-2011, 03:25 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,171,331 times
Reputation: 7739
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Shreveports metro area estimate is over 1 million while Baton Rouge's is shy of 1 million. That's about a 100% increase in Shreveport versus a 10-15% increase in Baton Rouge. That is why I don't see this list as legitimate, I'm no expert but that just doesn't seem reasonable.

This is a media market metric not a census metric. The populations are counted differently. I don't know enough about those metros to add any meaningful insight. I do know that Philly as an example the DMA includes areas that the census considers the NYC metro (Trenton/Mercer NJ) and also Allentown PA and Atlantic City NJ. Many of these residents get their media and would likely associate as being in the Philly metro even though census commuter rates have allocated them into other census areas

but one thing DMA does do is provide a much better radial count of people living in close proximity to the city. It also sets the Ad rates for these cities, as an example i believe Philly is the 6th largest MSA and 7th or 8th largest CSA yet Ad space on Philly TV stations costs more than all but NYC/LA/Chicago as the TV market (based on signal distance at about 40 or so miles) includes 8 million people while the MSA cuts this number by 25%

Just another way to look at population. The one thing that makes sense on DMA is it gives a relative way to see how many people live the area based on how close they actually are and not tying arbitrary muncipal borders together
 
Old 02-03-2011, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,771,019 times
Reputation: 8804
My apologies then, Shreveport media market reaches into northeast TX and Arkansas.
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