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Old 04-23-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,454,548 times
Reputation: 6186

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAC NY View Post
Yet southern metros are all the way at the bottom when it comes to per capita income. What does the south have to show for its large growth? Absolutely nothing.

There is a difference between growth and good growth. The "sunbelt growth" has done nothing but shifted problems of the Northeast to sunbelt states (i.e. look at your real estate industry, spiking poverty levels, higher than average unemployment).

Grow away!
I'll tell you one thing it gave: increased influence in government (more representatives in Congress, etc...)
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Old 04-23-2012, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,454,548 times
Reputation: 6186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I know for a fact that North Dakota did up until the last few years. It's seen a very small amount of growth recently, but most of the last decade saw a decline. And I'm not sure what that has to do with anything. If there are jobs available, unemployment will be low regardless of how many people live in an area. And you're not doing the South any favors by suggesting that those Northern states maintain lower unemployment overall. It would pretty much defeat the entire though process that the South has more job opportunities. Clearly, if that was the case, unemployment would stay lower there as well. Instead, it's some of the highest in the nation.
The reason the South has higher unemployment than those northern Plains states is we have droves of people moving here without jobs just because they heard that things are better down here. You don't get the same effect up north.
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:11 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,226 posts, read 17,984,770 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
The reason the South has higher unemployment than those northern Plains states is we have droves of people moving here without jobs just because they heard that things are better down here. You don't get the same effect up north.
I don't know if it's quite as true now, but five years ago, many employers in Pittsburgh said they were struggling to fill job openings because they just weren't getting enough applicants, qualified or not. Some of them even said the locals believed that there were no jobs available, and getting people outside the region to move to Pittsburgh was a hard sell, so many job openings remained vacant for months on end.

Ironically, now there there's an influx of Texans into the Pittsburgh area for jobs in the energy industry.
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,454,548 times
Reputation: 6186
Quote:
Originally Posted by JazzyTallGuy View Post
Which is my problem with the whole lifestyle in most Sun Belt cities. Everybody is so busy staying inside a home, a shopping mall or their car TURNING ON THEIR A/C that these cities tend to lack a certain cultural vibrancy when compared other parts of the country. Where people actually get outside their homes, cars, malls and office buidling and interact with each other. The suburbs of Sun Belt cities particularly lack any type of character everything is housing developments, chain stores, strip centers and shopping malls. It's a very homogenized lifestyle that works fine for a lot people.
People get outside quite a bit in Austin. You'll see people hiking the trails, kayaking, walking all over town even in the dog days of summer. Also, people up north go from heated house to heated car to heated building as much as people in the south go from a/c house to a/c car to a/c building during work hours...
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,827 posts, read 9,454,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
It's not like people are outside in 100 degree heat with 80% humidity enjoying themselves. No, they're holed up in the A/C.
I can go swimming when it's 100 degrees and still barbeque and sit out on the deck in the evening when it's cooler and drink beers. It's possible to hang around outside when it's 100 doing various things.

It's impossible to "hang out" outside when it's 0 degrees. Sure, you might be able to ski (if you live near slopes or have cross country facilities) or whatever, but nobody would be "hanging out" on a deck at night for hours on end.
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Old 04-24-2012, 07:21 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,828,779 times
Reputation: 11141
Unless A/C goes away, the boom in the South will continue. Simply put, there are many people who don't like shoveling snow and/or being cold for 6 months a year.
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Old 04-24-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,955,665 times
Reputation: 10561
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Unless A/C goes away, the boom in the South will continue. Simply put, there are many people who don't like shoveling snow and/or being cold for 6 months a year.
I'm sorry, I don't understand this.

In warm weather, you use AC, in cold weather, you use heat, meaning the internal temperature is regulated no matter what.

When it's cold out, I put on a jacket, and I'm 100% comfortable, unless the temperature gets below 20 degrees or the wind is blowing hard. When I go inside, I take off the jacket.

The same isn't true in warm weather. Personally, as a hairy guy of northern European extraction, I sweat if I have to wear more than a T-shirt and the temperature gets much above 75 degrees. But of course if you work an office job, you pretty much have to wear more than one layer. Meaning I'm always a horrible drippy mess.

I can see why people would want to move to the west coast, and not deal with hot summers or cold winters. But I can't see trading off the already intolerable Northeastern summer for even MORE summer and less winter.
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Old 04-24-2012, 08:21 AM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,637,123 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'm sorry, I don't understand this.

In warm weather, you use AC, in cold weather, you use heat, meaning the internal temperature is regulated no matter what.

When it's cold out, I put on a jacket, and I'm 100% comfortable, unless the temperature gets below 20 degrees or the wind is blowing hard. When I go inside, I take off the jacket.

The same isn't true in warm weather. Personally, as a hairy guy of northern European extraction, I sweat if I have to wear more than a T-shirt and the temperature gets much above 75 degrees. But of course if you work an office job, you pretty much have to wear more than one layer. Meaning I'm always a horrible drippy mess.

I can see why people would want to move to the west coast, and not deal with hot summers or cold winters. But I can't see trading off the already intolerable Northeastern summer for even MORE summer and less winter.
This post fits my preferences. Living in the northeast, I find the summers unbearable with how humid it gets. I could not even imagine living in the southeast where it is humid and hot for even longer.
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Old 04-24-2012, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,059,932 times
Reputation: 3925
There is more to it than weather and A/C, otherwise metros like Fargo and Sioux Falls wouldn't be growing faster than similar sized metros like Waco, Macon, Tuscaloosa or Amarillo.
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Old 04-24-2012, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,150,575 times
Reputation: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I can go swimming when it's 100 degrees and still barbeque and sit out on the deck in the evening when it's cooler and drink beers. It's possible to hang around outside when it's 100 doing various things.

It's impossible to "hang out" outside when it's 0 degrees. Sure, you might be able to ski (if you live near slopes or have cross country facilities) or whatever, but nobody would be "hanging out" on a deck at night for hours on end.
No, it really isn't! But you're right, the BBQ is usually "off" when it's 0 outside.....just like you probably don't use the fireplace or sauna when it's 105.
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