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Old 04-26-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 630,426 times
Reputation: 280

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
There are more than 300 million people in the US. Certainly there are many who will prefer to stay in cooler places. However, there are many people who are sick and tired or long, cold Winters. It comes down to picking ones poison whether it's about weather, costs of living, traffic, distance to ones relatives, yadda, yadda, yadda.

A/C has mitigated the poison of long hot Summers in places across the entire sunbelt and was a factor in changing minds of millions over the last several decades.
On the Plains we can have long, cold winters and long, hot summers it depends on the year. The climate is for the hardy and many people here as a result live well into their 90s. The Plains are not close to most people's relatives although they are centrally located to both coasts and within a day's drive of many of the Great Lakes states and many of the Rocky Mountain states. Can't beat the lack of traffic, low cost of living, and wide open space!
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,428,839 times
Reputation: 6153
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
There are more than 300 million people in the US. Certainly there are many who will prefer to stay in cooler places. However, there are many people who are sick and tired or long, cold Winters. It comes down to picking ones poison whether it's about weather, costs of living, traffic, distance to ones relatives, yadda, yadda, yadda.

A/C has mitigated the poison of long hot Summers in places across the entire sunbelt and was a factor in changing minds of millions over the last several decades.
Yes, basically A/C normalized the south against the north. The north always had heating, so the old choice was between a climate controlled winter up north or a sweltering summer down south without A/C, many kept up north. Once the choice was between a climate controlled winter up north and a climate controlled summer down south, variables such as rain or snowfall, percent of sunshine, etc... became more important factors than temperature itself.

Take someone that prefers to stay indoors all year. They can choose between a place where they have to have many inconveniences in the winter due to snow delaying their life or a place where weather almost never interferes (unless they live near the coasts or in tornado alley).

Then if someone is outdoorsy, you have to look where temps are mild and the south can get 8 months of really great weather but the north usually only has around 6 months of it.
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Old 04-26-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,427 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
A/C has mitigated the poison of long hot Summers in places across the entire sunbelt and was a factor in changing minds of millions over the last several decades.
Again, I'm sorry, this just makes no sense to me.

In the north, people tend to go outside in the spring/fall, to a lesser degree in the summer if it isn't hot, and stay indoors in the winter.

In the south, it's just the reverse. People still go outside in the spring/fall, spend the (longer) summer largely indoors, but can be outdoors in the winter if it's not too cold.

Either way, you spend one whole season avoiding going outside unless you are properly attired, along with segments of the opposite season. As you move further south, the amount of "bad days" in the winter decreases, but the amount of "bad days" in the summer also rises. It seems like a zero-sum game.
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Old 04-26-2012, 02:35 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,378,103 times
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It's not like the north is empying out or anything. Since 2005 according to the IRS records, 1.7 million people have moved from the midwest to the South. during that same time though 1.3 million people moved from the south into the midwest. There's still a net loss of 400K, but that's only around 0.6% of the Midwest's population (which was more than made up through immigration).

The west actually brings in as many people as it sends out. It's immigration, mostly from mexico and latin american countries that gives it the strong population growth.
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Old 04-26-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,173,289 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Again, I'm sorry, this just makes no sense to me.

In the north, people tend to go outside in the spring/fall, to a lesser degree in the summer if it isn't hot, and stay indoors in the winter.

In the south, it's just the reverse. People still go outside in the spring/fall, spend the (longer) summer largely indoors, but can be outdoors in the winter if it's not too cold.

Either way, you spend one whole season avoiding going outside unless you are properly attired, along with segments of the opposite season. As you move further south, the amount of "bad days" in the winter decreases, but the amount of "bad days" in the summer also rises. It seems like a zero-sum game.
i think its your post that doesn't make sense. People have repeated it multiple times, and I will say it again. Who says people don't go out in the sunbelt during the summer. Some people jog in parks here 365.25 days a year here. In Austin they probably do it for 400
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
There was a difference in the early history of our country. There was always heat but not A/C. A/C normalized the south against the north, the indoor climate could now be the same in both areas so then it's a choice between being warm to hot most of the year or being cold to cool most of the year. People voted with their feet to move south.
My argument is actually that economics, and not weather, played the dominant role in migration. You may get retirees moving solely because of weather, but the majority of people move because of jobs. There are cities in the North that continue to have moderate to high population growth, and yet how is this possible if weather is all that matters? It's about economics. Anyone who truly believes that the Sun Belt will maintain this advantage is fooling themselves. And as has been mentioned, big economic changes like the nation has been going through tend to see shifts in how and where people live. Nowhere has growth slowed down more in the last 5 years than in the Sun Belt. The area continues to grow, but it's had a longer fall than other areas. If unemployment concerns remain for an extended period, and it's up in the air if they will, people will eventually catch on. There's really more unknown about future population patterns right now than at any time since WWII ended and the Baby Boom began, which started the exodus to the suburbs.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
The reason the South has higher unemployment than those northern Plains states is we have droves of people moving here without jobs just because they heard that things are better down here. You don't get the same effect up north.
The Dakotas are growing in population, and their per-capita GDP is skyrocketing, and they have the lowest unemployment rates in the nation, by far. Droves of people moving to an area that doesn't have enough jobs to begin with is not a recipe for a great economic future, especially if the people you're gaining are not particularly educated, which seems to be the case.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I don't know if it's quite as true now, but five years ago, many employers in Pittsburgh said they were struggling to fill job openings because they just weren't getting enough applicants, qualified or not. Some of them even said the locals believed that there were no jobs available, and getting people outside the region to move to Pittsburgh was a hard sell, so many job openings remained vacant for months on end.

Ironically, now there there's an influx of Texans into the Pittsburgh area for jobs in the energy industry.
I just read that Ohio is experiencing the same problem. Jobs are returning faster than companies can find qualified candidates for.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I can go swimming when it's 100 degrees and still barbeque and sit out on the deck in the evening when it's cooler and drink beers. It's possible to hang around outside when it's 100 doing various things.

It's impossible to "hang out" outside when it's 0 degrees. Sure, you might be able to ski (if you live near slopes or have cross country facilities) or whatever, but nobody would be "hanging out" on a deck at night for hours on end.
Not really. I know I was personally out all the time in winter. I even tent camped in January. My hometown of Columbus has outdoor events all the time in winter. People adapt for the most part, but there is no way that extreme heat is any better than extreme cold.
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Old 04-26-2012, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
There is more to it than weather and A/C, otherwise metros like Fargo and Sioux Falls wouldn't be growing faster than similar sized metros like Waco, Macon, Tuscaloosa or Amarillo.
Exactly, it's economics. Nothing more.
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