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Old 04-27-2012, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,913,851 times
Reputation: 10533

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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I hate the heat and the cold. Both suck, people have there preferences. However, I'd would rather deal with a long summer and beaches rather than a foot of snow outside my door and frozen pipes.
There are more Louisianans that live in urban areas and don't do outdoor activities as much as people probably do in New Hampshire. But why does NH come out to 190% and LA 104%?
The numbers aren't supposed to add up, since it's the percent of the population which engages in a certain outdoor activities. Obviously some people do more than one, perhaps all.
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Old 04-27-2012, 03:43 PM
 
29,892 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
You have double digit unemployment in many of your counties. You have a long ways to go...
They tend to be the more rural, isolated counties and they've historically had unemployment rates higher than the rest of the state, even in the best of times. The vast majority of new manufacturing investment is happening in the larger metropolitan areas.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,477,370 times
Reputation: 5766
Rank of states for % of manufacturing jobs to total non-farm jobs. February 2012.

1. Indiana: 16.7%
2. Wisconsin: 16.3%
3. Michigan: 13.1%
4. Ohio: 12.6%
5. South Carolina: 12.0%
6. Tennessee: 11.4%
7. Minnesota: 11.2%
8. North Carolina: 11.0%
9. Illinois: 10.2%
10. Pennsylvania: 9.9%

And Metros by rank for % of manufacturing jobs to total non-farm jobs. February 2012.

1. Cleveland: 12.5%
2. Detroit: 11.8%
3. Cincinnati: 11.1%
4. Minneapolis: 10.4%
5. Los Angeles: 9.9%
6. Chicago: 9.8%
6. Buffalo: 9.8%
7. Indianapolis: 9.2%
8. Houston: 8.8%
9. Dallas: 8.7%
9. St. Louis: 8.7%
10. Columbia, SC: 8.4%
10. Nashville: 8.4%

Some things to remember about the numbers:
1. Northern states, especially the Great Lakes area, continue to lead in manufacturing jobs by far, and this is after 40 years of job outsourcing, technology changes and population shifts. The region is still the nation's manufacturing powerhouse, and manufacturing jobs are now on the rise again.
2. At one time, these same Northern states supported manufacturing industries that were significantly larger, so this idea that a return of manufacturing means that the Sun Belt has more advantage in terms of infrastructure or experience is just nonsense. Throw in the fact that manufacturing needs abundant water, and considering you have the largest fresh water source in the entire world in the Great Lakes, it's an advantage that the Sun Belt can simply never compete with.
3. Cost of doing business is rising in the Sun Belt, and not just recently, but it's been a longer term, slow trend, making the old North more competitive for industry.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,477,370 times
Reputation: 5766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Ok fine. From brookings.
Portland: 32%
San Jose: 29%
Indianapolis: 19.1%
Milwaukee: 16.5%
Rochester: 15.9%
New Orleans: 15.5%
Detroit: 15.3%
Louisville: 15.3%
Tulsa: 14.9%
Austin: 14.8%
Cleveland: 14.8%
Houston: 14.7%
Cincinnati: 14.5%
San Francisco: 13.6%
Dallas: 13.5%
Minneapolis: 12.5%
Seattle: 12.4%
Chicago: 12.1%
St. Louis: 12.1%
Charlotte: 12%
Los Angeles: 11.9%
Raleigh: 11.5%
Salt Lake City: 11.5%
Memphis: 11.1%
Nashville: 11.1%
Buffalo: 10.7%
Providence: 10.4%
San Diego: 10.3%
Boston: 9.8%
Phoenix: 9.8%
Pittsburgh: 9.8%
Birmingham: 9.4%
Omaha: 8.9%
Riverside: 8.9%
Richmond: 8.9%
Columbus: 8.7%
Kansas City: 8.5%
Virginia Beach: 8.2%
Philadelphia: 8%
Baltimore: 7%
Oklahoma City: 7%
San Antonio: 7%
Tampa: 6.6%
Denver: 6.2%
Des Moines: 5.8%
Jacksonville: 5.5%
Sacramento: 5.3%
New York: 4.5%
Orlando: 4.5%
Miami: 3.9%
Las Vegas: 3.2%
Washington DC: 2.3%
Do you have a link? I have Brookings links and BLS links and these don't match what I have.
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 630,038 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
They tend to be the more rural, isolated counties and they've historically had unemployment rates higher than the rest of the state, even in the best of times. The vast majority of new manufacturing investment is happening in the larger metropolitan areas.
Union, Chester, Lancaster, and Fairfield Counties were decimated by the departure of the textile industry for overseas. York, Cherokee, and Spartanburg Counties are all along interstates and could easily develop more in the way of manufacturing jobs. More so Cherokee and Spartanburg Counties because they are along I-85. South Carolina is not just Charleston, Greenville, or Lexington/Richland counties. Your state needs to work at bringing more jobs to the state as a whole including counties that are not very isolated from the interstate. To deny that the recession did not hit the state hard is truely a fallacy.
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
5,950 posts, read 7,319,432 times
Reputation: 3731
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I hate the heat and the cold. Both suck, people have there preferences. However, I'd would rather deal with a long summer and beaches rather than a foot of snow outside my door and frozen pipes.
There are more Louisianans that live in urban areas and don't do outdoor activities as much as people probably do in New Hampshire. But why does NH come out to 190% and LA 104%?
Outside of the snow belt and mountains, it's pretty rare to get more than a foot of snow at one time. Also, no one in North has their pipes freeze like you probably think they do dramatically and if they are freezing that often you need to call someone to fix them.
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Old 04-28-2012, 12:20 AM
 
29,892 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
Union, Chester, Lancaster, and Fairfield Counties were decimated by the departure of the textile industry for overseas. York, Cherokee, and Spartanburg Counties are all along interstates and could easily develop more in the way of manufacturing jobs. More so Cherokee and Spartanburg Counties because they are along I-85. South Carolina is not just Charleston, Greenville, or Lexington/Richland counties. Your state needs to work at bringing more jobs to the state as a whole including counties that are not very isolated from the interstate. To deny that the recession did not hit the state hard is truely a fallacy.
Oh I never denied that the recession hit my native state hard because it did, but the decline in textiles started happening long before that. The recession only exacerbated the problem (although in some cases, like York, it's mainly the recession that's responsible for high unemployment) which is when counties that weren't in the best shape but still didn't post double-digit unemployment rates started doing so. The counties in the greater Charlotte area in particular, like York, Lancaster, and Chester, will continue to benefit from their location once the recovery truly takes hold.

It's unrealistic to expect that every county is going to get big eco-devo projects, and certainly not all are going to be landing corporate white-collar operations. Instead, what will happen is that they'll get some smaller developments here and there (e.g., suppliers for the auto/tire industry) but many residents will wind up commuting to the nearest major metro for employment. SC isn't a Midwest big ag state, so it's not going to have super low unemployment rates in every county.
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Old 04-28-2012, 12:42 AM
 
29,892 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Some things to remember about the numbers:
1. Northern states, especially the Great Lakes area, continue to lead in manufacturing jobs by far, and this is after 40 years of job outsourcing, technology changes and population shifts. The region is still the nation's manufacturing powerhouse, and manufacturing jobs are now on the rise again.
2. At one time, these same Northern states supported manufacturing industries that were significantly larger, so this idea that a return of manufacturing means that the Sun Belt has more advantage in terms of infrastructure or experience is just nonsense. Throw in the fact that manufacturing needs abundant water, and considering you have the largest fresh water source in the entire world in the Great Lakes, it's an advantage that the Sun Belt can simply never compete with.
3. Cost of doing business is rising in the Sun Belt, and not just recently, but it's been a longer term, slow trend, making the old North more competitive for industry.
A few other things to consider that are advantageous to the Sunbelt are the importance of ports, a younger workforce, and a more judicious use of incentives (which is not without controversy, but nonetheless, it's part of the arsenal).

As I stated before, obviously the Midwest (and parts of the Northeast) still retains many of its built-in advantages when it comes to manufacturing and I'd love to see cities like Youngstown and Detroit find new life, but the rise of the South cannot be discounted either. Personally, I think there's room at the table for both regions.
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Old 04-28-2012, 04:13 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,160,886 times
Reputation: 6115
Interesting thoughts.

I was also wondering if manufacuring of goods is beinc incourced how will the large ports be effected in California, New York.

You would think it would have an effect.
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Old 04-28-2012, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,097 posts, read 13,477,370 times
Reputation: 5766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
A few other things to consider that are advantageous to the Sunbelt are the importance of ports, a younger workforce, and a more judicious use of incentives (which is not without controversy, but nonetheless, it's part of the arsenal).

As I stated before, obviously the Midwest (and parts of the Northeast) still retains many of its built-in advantages when it comes to manufacturing and I'd love to see cities like Youngstown and Detroit find new life, but the rise of the South cannot be discounted either. Personally, I think there's room at the table for both regions.
A younger workforce based on what, though? Hispanic immigrants? Youth just doesn't count as much for high-tech or manufacturing jobs that require advanced degrees. When it comes to education, the North leads by far. And many of the Sun Belt states have the fastest-growing senior populations.

And yes, the Sun Belt has been taking full use of the available methods of corporate extortion (incentives is a very nice way to put it). However, if the base cost of doing business is competitive in both areas (and it wasn't for a long time), there's going to have to be other fundamental reasons for a company to move operations in the future.
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