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Old 05-05-2012, 02:39 PM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,085,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
"Advantage" is quite subjective since we're not really talking about skilled, educated immigrants for the most part. At any rate, it's pretty clear that the Sunbelt states have the edge in domestic migration, even with the slowdown that's occurred due to the recession.



With the exception of Florida and probably Arizona, Sunbelt states are seeing rapid increases across the board due to higher migration rates. The problem with many Rustbelt metro areas is that they're experiencing major brain drain as the younger population flees, which is a major reason why the overall population skews older.
Correct!
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Old 05-06-2012, 12:23 PM
 
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Believe me, plenty of brain drain here in the sunbelt, too. Some of the ones that move in and ones that stay here. Even w/ higher education/degrees, it doesn't necessarily equate to an area feeling smarter.
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Despite gentrification in urban cities, the migration downwards is soaring and isn't expected to end any time soon. Construction and real estate is going to continue although there were setbacks in those sectors due to the recession. Not only are blacks and hispanics leaving the NE as the years go by, whites are leaving in huge numbers as well.



As much as we don't like it, the housing boom is coming back.


The sunbelt boom is not going to end probably until the next 20 years.
Depletion of resources and rising energy costs will end the sunbelt boom. There is a reason these cities did not sprout up until technology made it possible -- living in a desert was neither attractive nor possible.
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juppiter View Post
Depletion of resources and rising energy costs will end the sunbelt boom. There is a reason these cities did not sprout up until technology made it possible -- living in a desert was neither attractive nor possible.
You realize that not all parts of the Sunbelt are desert, right? In fact, most of it isn't.
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You realize that not all parts of the Sunbelt are desert, right? In fact, most of it isn't.
Although not a desert, MOST parts of the sunbelt are dealing with drought and water issues....just like a desert. Those problems DO need to be resolved if the cities in this region are going to continue to prosper, or even stay afloat!
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Although not a desert, MOST parts of the sunbelt are dealing with drought and water issues....just like a desert. Those problems DO need to be resolved if the cities in this region are going to continue to prosper, or even stay afloat!
Water is a REQUIRED neccessity for life.
If Atlanta runs out of water which someday the city will strain its resources then the city/metro population stops growing and will start to decline.
Gotta have water to live
Luckily places like Indianapolis we have plenty of water to allow us to grow. Plus places like Chicago/Detroit/Milwaukee have Lake Michigan to drink from.
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 632,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Although not a desert, MOST parts of the sunbelt are dealing with drought and water issues....just like a desert. Those problems DO need to be resolved if the cities in this region are going to continue to prosper, or even stay afloat!
? I don't think the Southeast is going to face these kind of problems. Other than Lake Lanier a few years ago almost being empty which could happen anywhere, the Southwest is the one that needs to worry whereas the Southeast has a lot of rivers and reservoirs!
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:36 PM
 
30,006 posts, read 27,563,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Although not a desert, MOST parts of the sunbelt are dealing with drought and water issues....just like a desert. Those problems DO need to be resolved if the cities in this region are going to continue to prosper, or even stay afloat!
Agreed, but that's not the same as being a desert. Droughts are cyclical and periodic. I think people tend to look at the largest Southern metros in particular that are dealing with water issues while forgetting about the midsized/smaller metros that don't have this problem, and there's more of the latter than the former.
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Old 05-06-2012, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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The southeast is one of the wettest regions of the country. Their water issues are mostly political. I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for them to run out of water.
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Old 05-07-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
The southeast is one of the wettest regions of the country. Their water issues are mostly political. I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for them to run out of water.
I realize that 100%, but you still have to capture that water, and you're right, it becomes a political or budget issue. Still has to be done though...not saying it won't, but it won't be free either.
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