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Old 06-11-2012, 07:40 PM
 
29,961 posts, read 27,470,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
As I said, inner cities in sunbelt metros are booming, and those cities are looking more at creating dense communities and more transit. But I had this argument with a friend one day, and I'll stick to this point to the grave. The majority of people move to the sunbelt because of "what it is" currently, not what it is looking to become.
They are, but I don't think that has much to do with urban form. Aside from the rush of retirees, people (domestic migrants) are moving to the Sunbelt these days for the same reason people moved up North in the past: jobs and economic opportunity. The difference is that in the past when more people were moving to the North, the vast majority of jobs were located in and around the urban core. Nowadays, even in the Northeast and Midwest, the majority of growth in the metro areas are occurring in the suburbs for the most part because overall, that's where a lot of job growth is occurring--not to mention other factors like schools, affordability, etc.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:08 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 631,261 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
They are, but I don't think that has much to do with urban form. Aside from the rush of retirees, people (domestic migrants) are moving to the Sunbelt these days for the same reason people moved up North in the past: jobs and economic opportunity. The difference is that in the past when more people were moving to the North, the vast majority of jobs were located in and around the urban core. Nowadays, even in the Northeast and Midwest, the majority of growth in the metro areas are occurring in the suburbs for the most part because overall, that's where a lot of job growth is occurring--not to mention other factors like schools, affordability, etc.
What do you call a person moving to the Sunbelt absent a job and moving to a Sunbelt city with a difficult job market? There are obviously more draws to Sunbelt cities than the job market alone otherwise low unemployment cities would be flooded with job seekers! I'm sure it has some to do with weather and amenities (people seem to be increasingly wimpy on the weather front, amenities I don't fault people on one bit!)
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,331,245 times
Reputation: 4270
They move for the weather, period. Look at the polls on this forum and people admit their weather biases.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,331,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
This is true. Sadly I feel like people are more influenced by weather and perceived "coolness" than anything else. Omaha, NE has jobs, a low cost of living, sprawling suburbs and strip malls like anywhere else, acreages. The problem? It gets too "cold" in the winter and "too much snow" (the snow is less than Chicago's and much less than a place like Buffalo, NY). It's also isolated being hundreds of miles from the nearest big city. It is not close to the mountains or the beach (Dallas is not either) and it along with the rest of the Midwest (excepting Chicago) is mostly seen as "uncool" and has a real image problem. Prior to the recession and in the cities that are now coming back to a more cautiously reduced extent, economic opportunities were a big draw to the Sunbelt. I agree with other posters that I fail to see the expediency of moving to a high unemployment Sunbelt city without a job, in a field not immune to the ups and downs of the recession, for emotional and financial reasons alone (my new city is "cool", has great weather, and a low cost of living...) Many of the Sunbelt cities are coming back economically but slowly so it is going to be buyer beware and a decision needs to be made on a city-by-city basis. But give the Plains cities a look, we are there we have jobs and we are affordable!
This stuff changes every generation.....next time the Upper Plains states will be popular, who knows!! NOTHING is trendy or cool forever. It's really not much different than stocks: you have your blue chips (NYC, Chicago, SF, etc.), your high betas, your small CAPs, etc....and if people knew today where people would be living tomorrow 100% certain they could become filthy rich buying land in those areas. Now go ask a land speculator you know how easy their job is!
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:48 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 631,261 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
They move for the weather, period. Look at the polls on this forum and people admit their weather biases.
I find that silly. I like cold weather but am probably in the minority. Then again people that stay in the North and thrive and that don't look at moving are more likely people who don't mind the weather or if they do there is enough keeping them in place where they are that the weather becomes a relatively minor factor. I can see the weather being a factor for the elderly (not wanting to slip on ice, cold weather aggravating their arthritis, inability to shovel snow) but for people in their working years I think people make way too big a deal out of weather.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:53 PM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,299,713 times
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Beg to differ. It's ending as I type. Prices falling and bad press.

That was the beginning of the end of the "Rust Belt". So yeah, it's over.
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Old 06-11-2012, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,998,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
What do you call a person moving to the Sunbelt absent a job and moving to a Sunbelt city with a difficult job market? There are obviously more draws to Sunbelt cities than the job market alone otherwise low unemployment cities would be flooded with job seekers! I'm sure it has some to do with weather and amenities (people seem to be increasingly wimpy on the weather front, amenities I don't fault people on one bit!)
Yep, that's the point I was making earlier. A lot of people who find densely populated urban areas "cool", think the only reason someone would move to a sprawling sunbelt metro must be for a job. As I said before, if jobs were all that mattered, a city like Pittsburgh, PA with its low unemployment and realitive affordabilty would be one of the fastest growing metros in the country. Instead it's losing population. It's obviously more than just jobs and cheap housing that is attracting people to the sunbelt.
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Old 06-12-2012, 03:24 AM
 
29,961 posts, read 27,470,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
What do you call a person moving to the Sunbelt absent a job and moving to a Sunbelt city with a difficult job market? There are obviously more draws to Sunbelt cities than the job market alone otherwise low unemployment cities would be flooded with job seekers! I'm sure it has some to do with weather and amenities (people seem to be increasingly wimpy on the weather front, amenities I don't fault people on one bit!)
Weather and amenities (which is a result of job growth) are secondary factors; weather is more of a primary factor for retirees. The Sunbelt population boom is directly correlated with economic development. The biggest job centers in the Sunbelt (which don't necessarily have the lowest unemployment rates) are the ones that got/are getting the majority of the growth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
I find that silly. I like cold weather but am probably in the minority. Then again people that stay in the North and thrive and that don't look at moving are more likely people who don't mind the weather or if they do there is enough keeping them in place where they are that the weather becomes a relatively minor factor. I can see the weather being a factor for the elderly (not wanting to slip on ice, cold weather aggravating their arthritis, inability to shovel snow) but for people in their working years I think people make way too big a deal out of weather.
^This. I'm not saying it's not a factor, but it's more of a secondary factor. For the most part, what's primarily driving growth in the Sunbelt is no different than what's driven growth in other regions historically: jobs and economic development.
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,331,245 times
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People go where they can get paid. If they can get paid in Pittsburgh, that's where they'll go. Some places have to pay more to get people to come, like North Dakota, but it's growing -- FAST! Dollar dollar bills, ya'll!
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:12 AM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 631,261 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
People go where they can get paid. If they can get paid in Pittsburgh, that's where they'll go. Some places have to pay more to get people to come, like North Dakota, but it's growing -- FAST! Dollar dollar bills, ya'll!
They don't go where they can get paid if there are jobs that can't be filled like in Omaha, Nebraska or Sioux Falls, South Dakota and if they move without a job to a place they either know has a difficult job market or that they are willfully ignorant of but happens to have nice weather, beach, and/or mountains, and is seen by society as "desirable". North Dakota is getting the spotlight because it has the 6 figure oil jobs and is the state with THE lowest unemployment in the nation (which counts for a lot more than the state with the second or third lowest unemployment) but if it didn't have either it is doubtful people would move there because it is too cold for many people, it is geographically isolated, is seen as very undesirable by society, lacks beaches and mountains, and doesn't have the amenities that people are looking for.
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