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Old 01-27-2011, 02:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinablue View Post
Rains here all the time.

Florida and Georgia are going through droughts.
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,626 posts, read 27,037,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
That doesn't even make sense. Unemployment rates are affected by people who cannot find work because there are not enough jobs. If there are no companies to employ residents, the obvious result would be higher unemployment, not lower.

I remember seeing a report on the news about North Dakota in particular and how they had way more jobs available than they had people. They were practically begging people to move there to fill them.
I think you're misunderstanding. You are right. Rates are affected by people who cannot find work. However, the states that you harp on in the Plains, Northeast, and Midwest, never really had declining population or high employment rate in the first place. They hardly have diverse industries as the growing sunbelt states and they will usually hover around the top.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:12 PM
 
56,500 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Again, I don't think that people realize that not all of the Northeast is above average in terms of COL. In many Upstate NY metros, you can get a decent home for under 100k and in a good school district. So, you can live comfortably in many parts of the NE.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:22 PM
 
2,109 posts, read 5,134,451 times
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Quote:
Again, I don't think that people realize that not all of the Northeast is above average in terms of COL. In many Upstate NY metros, you can get a decent home for under 100k and in a good school district. So, you can live comfortably in many parts of the NE.
But then again- Upstate NY gets feet and feet of snow for months on end. Of course some people don't mind that and some even like it. But I'd wager that given the choice, most people would choose the $150,000 house in Georgia versus a $150,000 house in Upstate NY for none other than weather alone.
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Old 01-27-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,945,732 times
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The Pittsburgh area has a low cost of living, a low unemployment rate, good schools, three major universities, and lots of water and natural gas.

Pittsburgh = WIN
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,562 posts, read 7,667,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
the Sunblet may be gaining population but its population isn't gaining wealth for some reason.

Personal Income in the 2000s: Top and Bottom Ten Metropolitan Areas | Newgeography.com

I was very surprised about Atlanta & Phoenix. Very low per capita income, and it's still falling.
This was an issue that had to be discussed in another thread about Atlanta and Birmingham.

Per Capita income isn't a good measure to look at. Median Household income is much better and more telling. You will see many sunbelt cities, including Atlanta, have per capita incomes bias'd in a lower direction compared to Median Household income than would be seen in many other cities. Even, mean household income would be a better measure.

The problem is any region/place that has a higher birth rate than average or more children per family, etc... Per capita (and for that matter mean income) can be heavily biased by larger income disparities/income distritibution... more money at the top or more people that are extremely poor.

The median household income of Atlanta holds up really well and is one of the stronger places in the country. Mixed with a low cost of living and runaway land consumption you attract/encourage alot of big families. Even if someone wants to use Mean Household income... Atlanta holds up alot better there as well.
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Florida and Georgia are going through droughts.
Few issues... we are no longer going through a drought... but when we are... you need to remember what a drought is.

GA/FL are still humid semi-tropical/tropical environments... we go through a drought just because we get less rain than normal...and river levels falls... not because we get no rain.

When we went through our drought we still got plenty of rain...just not near as much as we, our reservoir, or river systems are use to.
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwkimbro View Post
Few issues... we are no longer going through a drought... but when we are... you need to remember what a drought is.

GA/FL are still humid semi-tropical/tropical environments... we go through a drought just because we get less rain than normal...and river levels falls... not because we get no rain.

When we went through our drought we still got plenty of rain...just not near as much as we, our reservoir, or river systems are use to.
Yup.
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,562 posts, read 7,667,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
That doesn't even make sense. Unemployment rates are affected by people who cannot find work because there are not enough jobs. If there are no companies to employ residents, the obvious result would be higher unemployment, not lower.

I remember seeing a report on the news about North Dakota in particular and how they had way more jobs available than they had people. They were practically begging people to move there to fill them.
Unemployment rates are often more stable and smaller in smaller states where the following occur:

1) the industry is more agricultural and/or self-employed/family based
2) Acts as a tax shelter due to the populations small size and desire from investment from just a few key industry/companies.
3) Have economies based in local resource extraction and that is the main driver of their population growth, where the extraction continues...even during recessions/downturns.

The Dakotas often have harsh winters, but they attract people to sparsely populated areas for their resources, tax shelters for financial companies, and farming. This especially holds true, when you compare the states with others with far larger populations.

States with larger populations must be much more diverse economically and can't soley depend on tax shelters, resource extraction, or farming. Which means that they are less likely to dodge the recession's effects on average.

Inversely... sometimes it is also possible for extremes to be reversed. This isn't the best example, because it has grown so much, but I'm going to bring up Nevada. The economy there is based off of tourism so much it is very prone to getting hit hard from a large recession. One of the first things to get axed from many family budgets are the more expensive vacations and gambling, while they focus more on saving and maintaining their home/basic necessities. Florida is in a similar boat to this, but also much larger and more diversified too.

Another area that is heavy on resource extraction and is typically begging for employees to put up with harsh environments and higher costs of living is Alaska. I'm not really sure how they have/haven't weathered the recession though. I haven't seen much talk about them.
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Old 01-27-2011, 08:24 PM
 
759 posts, read 1,670,425 times
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I have no clue if it will end or won't end, because it's impossible to predict the long-term future!

Kansas City could be the next boomtown. Or maybe Pittsburgh. Could be New Orleans, or Sacramento.

The point is, you can't predict decades out into the future. Change is really the only certain thing.

Las Vegas was the fastest growing city in the U.S. just four years ago, and now it's losing population.

Phoenix had the fastest numeric growth for a few years in the early 00's and is now barely growing.

Houston actually lost population for a few years in the 80's, and has since been booming.

Detroit was the world's fastest growing city 60 years ago.
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