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Old 07-24-2014, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The Midwest already had its boom.

I don't really see any other area of the country "re-booming" after all have had their booms. The South/Sunbelt was really the last to experience this phenomenon, so after it has had its time in the sun, the country as a whole will have leveled off.
So you're saying nowhere in the entire country can boom in the future? Because every single area has had a boom at one point or another in US history.
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Old 07-24-2014, 10:40 AM
 
11,177 posts, read 22,391,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
So you're saying nowhere in the entire country can boom in the future? Because every single area has had a boom at one point or another in US history.
It's all relative, doesn't have to be an entire region. Places like Des Moines and Omaha are booming now, it's not like the Midwest is just sleeping or something.
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Old 07-24-2014, 10:42 AM
 
29,945 posts, read 27,415,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Uh, locations can have multiple booms?
That would technically be a "re-boom." Since the topic of this thread is about the Sunbelt boom, when you speak of the Midwest, it already experienced that. And I don't see any subsequent boom in the Midwest experiencing the level of growth currently happening in the Sunbelt.

Quote:
Completely disagree. There will always be an area of the country that is growing significantly faster than the rest, and it will constantly shift... just like it always has.
"Just like it always has"? We're only talking a little over 200 years of U.S. history; that's not a long time at all. Outside of something very drastic and unforeseen, I simply don't see any other region of the country experiencing another boom like its initial one. The Sunbelt was the last to truly develop and beyond that, I see things leveling off across the board. There might be higher growth in other regions of the country but I wouldn't call those booms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
So you're saying nowhere in the entire country can boom in the future? Because every single area has had a boom at one point or another in US history.
Like the Sunbelt is booming now, or like the Northeast and Midwest boomed back in the day? Nah, don't see that happening. Even today, take a city that hit the bottom economically and has managed to make a dramatic comeback like Pittsburgh; no boom occurred in connection with its turnaround.

Higher growth patterns don't necessarily equal a boom.
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Old 07-24-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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North Dakota is currently experiencing its second boom; California has had several through its history. Come on!
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Old 07-24-2014, 11:26 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,943,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That would technically be a "re-boom." Since the topic of this thread is about the Sunbelt boom, when you speak of the Midwest, it already experienced that. And I don't see any subsequent boom in the Midwest experiencing the level of growth currently happening in the Sunbelt.



"Just like it always has"? We're only talking a little over 200 years of U.S. history; that's not a long time at all. Outside of something very drastic and unforeseen, I simply don't see any other region of the country experiencing another boom like its initial one. The Sunbelt was the last to truly develop and beyond that, I see things leveling off across the board. There might be higher growth in other regions of the country but I wouldn't call those booms.



Like the Sunbelt is booming now, or like the Northeast and Midwest boomed back in the day? Nah, don't see that happening. Even today, take a city that hit the bottom economically and has managed to make a dramatic comeback like Pittsburgh; no boom occurred in connection with its turnaround.

Higher growth patterns don't necessarily equal a boom.
Uh, not going to argue semantics with you. We disagree, period. (And I was talking about population growth, shifts, and migrations in history, not just the United States, regardless, I am not going to play your game of going back and forth with snotty comments.) We disagree, period.
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Old 07-24-2014, 12:01 PM
 
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When times are good optimism soars and the predictions of contraction are sparse. Michigan's middle class wealth seemed untouchable from 1940s-90s and state leadership saw very little need for diversification. No one predicted the fall of Rome until it was too late. People change, weather shifts, generational habits change too. Eventually any momentum must slow. No one can predict the patterns of the future. The balance of power has been shifting to the sunbelt for quite some time. To claim it will never change is hubris that can be dangerous.
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Old 07-24-2014, 02:38 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,375,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The Midwest already had its boom.

I don't really see any other area of the country "re-booming" after all have had their booms. The South/Sunbelt was really the last to experience this phenomenon, so after it has had its time in the sun, the country as a whole will have leveled off.
Actually the intermountain west area has not truly had a boom and some predict it is going to be the next "boom" area after the Sunbelt growth fizzles out. I'm referring specifically to northern plains region westward to the Cascades. You're already starting to see indicia of growth in Colorado, Idaho, and North Dakota. Whether it pervades the entire region the way it has in much of the south is up for debate. I personally hope it doesn't. There is still a lot of unspoiled, raw beauty there I'd hate to see blighted by Sunbelt-style sprawl patterns.
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Old 07-24-2014, 08:30 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 910,217 times
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If any major region of the U.S. "re-booms", it won't be on the same level as its original boom. I can see the Midwest experiencing population growth in the future, but nothing like what happened in the past. The country is balancing out. What you will more likely see is concentrated areas experiencing population booms independent of the region it's in. For example, someone mentioned North Dakota. It is currently experiencing a boom; however, I don't think that Kansas is benefiting from it. The poster above mentioned the a portion of the Intermountain West, but again, this is not a whole region but a part of a larger one.
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Old 07-24-2014, 08:51 PM
 
29,945 posts, read 27,415,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Uh, not going to argue semantics with you. We disagree, period. (And I was talking about population growth, shifts, and migrations in history, not just the United States, regardless, I am not going to play your game of going back and forth with snotty comments.) We disagree, period.
We disagree of course, but when have I ever been snotty? Come now.
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Old 07-24-2014, 08:57 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,899,724 times
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This thread would not have meant much to me before I found this website. I posted it on the world forum but I think it belongs on the states forum too.

Population Clock

I did not realize so many people were moving from the Northeast to the South.

Or maybe just coming to the USA and settling in the South so our percentage goes up.
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