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Old 07-24-2014, 08:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Actually the intermountain west area has not truly had a boom and some predict it is going to be the next "boom" area after the Sunbelt growth fizzles out. I'm referring specifically to northern plains region westward to the Cascades. You're already starting to see indicia of growth in Colorado, Idaho, and North Dakota. Whether it pervades the entire region the way it has in much of the south is up for debate. I personally hope it doesn't. There is still a lot of unspoiled, raw beauty there I'd hate to see blighted by Sunbelt-style sprawl patterns.
I can agree with this. It seems that metros like Denver, Colorado Springs, Ft. Collins, the greater Salt Lake City area (which includes areas like Provo, Orem, and Ogden), Boise, and Wiliston are leading the pack in that region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
If any major region of the U.S. "re-booms", it won't be on the same level as its original boom. I can see the Midwest experiencing population growth in the future, but nothing like what happened in the past. The country is balancing out. What you will more likely see is concentrated areas experiencing population booms independent of the region it's in. For example, someone mentioned North Dakota. It is currently experiencing a boom; however, I don't think that Kansas is benefiting from it. The poster above mentioned the a portion of the Intermountain West, but again, this is not a whole region but a part of a larger one.
I largely agree, but I think you can consider the Intermountain West a region for the sake of this discussion (although, in a more technical sense, it might be called a subregion). I think future innovations in energy will be a contributor to this phenomenon, but the effects will probably be more localized.
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:59 AM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
If any major region of the U.S. "re-booms", it won't be on the same level as its original boom. I can see the Midwest experiencing population growth in the future, but nothing like what happened in the past. The country is balancing out. What you will more likely see is concentrated areas experiencing population booms independent of the region it's in. For example, someone mentioned North Dakota. It is currently experiencing a boom; however, I don't think that Kansas is benefiting from it. The poster above mentioned the a portion of the Intermountain West, but again, this is not a whole region but a part of a larger one.
The Intermountain West is a difficult area to classify, but I would posit that it is just as large if not larger geographically than the South and Southwest areas (which themselves are their own discrete sections of the country as you know). You're looking at a huge swathe of the country, parts of which are in the census Midwest, Pac NW, and arguably Southwest. But demographers had no problem lumping the Southwest and South together and calling it the Sunbelt. Why would they have a problem doing that for the Intermountain West?

I do agree that you don't see a lot of spillover benefits, at least right now, between a lot of these northern states, and growth is generally occurring in isolated pockets. But I think it's still too early to tell what's going to happen. And also, even in the Sunbelt, not every state has necessarily benefitted from the growth patterns of the region (see Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Louisiana).
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