U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-31-2011, 07:54 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,579,421 times
Reputation: 1266

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gold15 View Post
I've been here 11 years and we've had TWO snow events worth discussing. Plenty of below-zero temps? Don't remember ANY of those (maybe with the wind chill it registered that low - but that's not common).

Winter in Atlanta, GA
Atlanta's winter days are mostly warm enough to go without a coat ' though a coat might be needed on a few of the coldest days. Nighttime lows fall into the low to mid 30s during December, January and February, but snow and ice are rare. Daytime highs are in the mid to upper 50s, so a light jacket or sweater will do the trick on most winter afternoons. Wintertime visitors will enjoy the city's many holiday festivals and celebrations.

People will type anything to make a point.
Mid to Upper 50s is a bit high. In Late February, you might have upper 50s as the average high in the actual city of Atlanta, but throughout January and half of February, even the city has highs averaging anywhere from upper 40s to low 50s.

The northern suburbs, and even some of the southwest suburbs, average highs in the mid 40s to low 50s, with an average somewhere in the upper 40s, throughout the months of January and February. Late December is similar in this regard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-02-2011, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,487,957 times
Reputation: 8718
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
A few years ago, Raleigh was identified as the projected fastest growing metro over the next few decades. Nothing I have seen yet would indicate that the prediction was wrong. The Triangle has grown rapidly over the last few decades from a small Southern metro into one of the main ones to watch in the coming decades.
When my family moved to Raleigh in the mid 70s, the city of Raleigh was smaller than Raleigh's current largest suburb: Cary. The County was less populated than the current Raleigh city limits. Wake County alone is more populated than the entire (current) CSA in just the last few decades. The growth has been astounding and all indicators point to it continuing for some time to come. The Triangle's "creative class" is driving the growth and its population is driving the migration of more of the same.

I agree with your projections. That is why with this particular Metro I have concerns. It is also a fairly educated population that should be aware, it can very quickly turn into a small version of Phoenix. Traffic traffic and sprawl for miles and miles. It seems as if Raleigh Durham is sprawling right into the Triad. There is no public transit to speak of. The way life is being dealth with is to build more fwys, and to widen existing ones. Yes I have my concerns about this well educated Metro. Its dragging of its feet on its infrastructure can be a red warning flag. Otherwise I think its one of the nicer Metro's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 12:56 PM
 
192 posts, read 495,343 times
Reputation: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
If cold had really been the issue, why didn't this migration happen decades ago?
Availability of A/C.

Weather has been a strong motivator for almost everyone I know who has migrated south.

I would be extremely disappointed if I had to go back to temps in the teens and frozen sidewalks after enjoying days like today when it is 70 degrees on 2/2. Not the only reason for the sunbelt boom, but don't underestimate the impact of climate on quality of life.

Unfortunately, I'm stuck inside working for most of this 70 degree day...at least it's nice to see sun shining in through the windows, and to look forward to a bike ride after work!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 01:19 PM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by scdreamer View Post
Availability of A/C.

Weather has been a strong motivator for almost everyone I know who has migrated south.

I would be extremely disappointed if I had to go back to temps in the teens and frozen sidewalks after enjoying days like today when it is 70 degrees on 2/2. Not the only reason for the sunbelt boom, but don't underestimate the impact of climate on quality of life.

Unfortunately, I'm stuck inside working for most of this 70 degree day...at least it's nice to see sun shining in through the windows, and to look forward to a bike ride after work!
So, what happens during the summer and parts of the spring and fall when it can get pretty brutal in terms of heat?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 02:15 PM
 
2,109 posts, read 5,136,222 times
Reputation: 1510
Quote:
So, what happens during the summer and parts of the spring and fall when it can get pretty brutal in terms of heat?
I'll tell you that the absolute two hottest places I've been in were:

1: Boston MA
2: Sacramento CA

For a place that gets so miserably cold, Boston gets even more miserably hot in the summer. So yeah- it gets hot up North too. Down South you might have weather that's in the 80's and 90's for a few months. As someone who grew up in the South it never really bothered me. Dealing with brutal winters is another thing altogether.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 02:55 PM
 
192 posts, read 495,343 times
Reputation: 127
Exactly, sliverbox.

The breezeless midwest summers of my youth were much more unbearable to me than living on the coastal south has been. We get a few months of 80-90, but summers generally reach those same temps in the majority of the midwest and northeast.

I'll always choose sun over -10 wind chill!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 03:01 PM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,886,330 times
Reputation: 4221
If the national unemployment rate is 9.4 and all those states in the South East are above the nation rate, guess what……those small states cannot offset the unemployment rate in the large SE states. Rather, its large states like NY, NJ, PA, MA and others that have lower than the national rate. When you aggregate those states unemployed with the states with the higher rates, then you get the 9.4 national rates.

Really folks, this nation is in the beginning of a radical paradigm shift in economics. One cannot extrapolate from past growth and predict future growth because the economy for the last several decades has been artificial and debt driven. The South’s long held advantage of labor cost and cost of living has faded. There are many medium sized cities up North whose cost of living is a low as the South and whose economies have been so decimated that unions have been emasculated and labor cost for new higher is very low given the number of unemployed.

Growth had become the main economic engine in places like Atlanta. Think of it like this. In our banking system we use fractional banking which results in banks lending out more money than they actually have in deposits. They have to keep a certain percentage on hand, their reserve requirements, by law. What would happen then if everyone came to get their deposits? The system would become quickly insolvent and the system would collapse. When population growth is your main economic engine, when that growth stops your economy is going to collapse because many of the present jobs in the boom towns were geared on creating housing and commercial development for future people and businesses. As long as the population continues to grow, jobs based upon speculation continued to grow. It’s like the housing boom and the speculation that homes would continue to appreciate forever and when home prices started falling, the whole market collapsed.

There are many factors that many areas of the South, in particular Atlanta, will not continue to grow as they did the last 20 years. We have entered a radically different era.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2011, 03:44 PM
 
2,109 posts, read 5,136,222 times
Reputation: 1510
Quote:
Really folks, this nation is in the beginning of a radical paradigm shift in economics. One cannot extrapolate from past growth and predict future growth because the economy for the last several decades has been artificial and debt driven. The South’s long held advantage of labor cost and cost of living has faded. There are many medium sized cities up North whose cost of living is a low as the South and whose economies have been so decimated that unions have been emasculated and labor cost for new higher is very low given the number of unemployed.
Faded? how do you gather that? Why is it that in the last few years ( as in in the last year or 2) Toyota, Nissan, Kia, and even a few electric vehicle startups have setup plants in the South? How come numerous pharmaceutical firms moved to North Carolina? I grew up in TN and have lived in both the Northeast and West Coast and whenever I visit back home the amount of industrial/economic growth is heads and tails way above anything I am seeing on the West Coast or what I saw in the Northeast. If anything the coasts and Midwest are for the most part fairly stagnant.

If you compare most major cities like Chicago, New York, Boston, LA, SF,DC, Seattle, and so on and so on these cities are still as much as 2 and 3 times more expensive to live in than most Southern cities. Where I live now a halfway decent house is $500,000. Back home I could buy a pretty nice house on some land for under $150,000. The cost of living advantage in the South is still a huge advantage and this will continue to be a huge draw. I'll be the first to tell you I am not thrilled about seeing my home region being flooded with people. But the economic growth I'm seeing there is undeniable and I suspect it will continue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 07:53 AM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
I'll tell you that the absolute two hottest places I've been in were:

1: Boston MA
2: Sacramento CA

For a place that gets so miserably cold, Boston gets even more miserably hot in the summer. So yeah- it gets hot up North too. Down South you might have weather that's in the 80's and 90's for a few months. As someone who grew up in the South it never really bothered me. Dealing with brutal winters is another thing altogether.
What are you comparing those two places to in the South? I remember being in Basic Training in SC and it was 100 degrees for a the week and even the Army made us roll up our sleeves and BDU pants. Same thing when I was in GA during AIT. I've experienced similar weather during the summer in NC and MS as well. TN might be a bit different, especially in Eastern TN. I've never had to deal with that in my area and it gets to about 90 maybe a few to a handful of days in the summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2011, 08:08 AM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliverbox View Post
Faded? how do you gather that? Why is it that in the last few years ( as in in the last year or 2) Toyota, Nissan, Kia, and even a few electric vehicle startups have setup plants in the South? How come numerous pharmaceutical firms moved to North Carolina? I grew up in TN and have lived in both the Northeast and West Coast and whenever I visit back home the amount of industrial/economic growth is heads and tails way above anything I am seeing on the West Coast or what I saw in the Northeast. If anything the coasts and Midwest are for the most part fairly stagnant.

If you compare most major cities like Chicago, New York, Boston, LA, SF,DC, Seattle, and so on and so on these cities are still as much as 2 and 3 times more expensive to live in than most Southern cities. Where I live now a halfway decent house is $500,000. Back home I could buy a pretty nice house on some land for under $150,000. The cost of living advantage in the South is still a huge advantage and this will continue to be a huge draw. I'll be the first to tell you I am not thrilled about seeing my home region being flooded with people. But the economic growth I'm seeing there is undeniable and I suspect it will continue.
Maybe you are using the wrong northern cities, as there are metros in Upstate NY with below average unemployment rates and average to below average cost of living, in a general sense. For instance, using my area as an example, it had the lower foreclosure rate out of the top 100 biggest metros late last year according to Forbes, was a top 10 location for military retirees according to USAA, had the most affordable housing market according to another publication and has an unemployment rate right now of 8%. You can find a home for 150k pretty much in any community in the area and that's even in very good school districts. Just so you don't think I'm pulling your leg, here what I'm talking about: CNYHomes - Detailed House Listing Information for MLS#S242830
CNYHomes - Detailed House Listing Information for MLS#S243945

Test Scores for Fayetteville-Manlius Central School District | GreatSchools

Fayetteville-Manlius Schools

http://www.fayettevilleny.gov/

http://www.manliusvillage.org/

Home Page - Town of Manlius, NY

Manlius (town), New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fayetteville-Manlius Central School District - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, there are areas in the North that are affordable, but are of a good quality as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top