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Old 01-26-2011, 05:33 AM
 
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Despite gentrification in urban cities, the migration downwards is soaring and isn't expected to end any time soon. Construction and real estate is going to continue although there were setbacks in those sectors due to the recession. Not only are blacks and hispanics leaving the NE as the years go by, whites are leaving in huge numbers as well.



As much as we don't like it, the housing boom is coming back.


The sunbelt boom is not going to end probably until the next 20 years.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Virginia Highland, GA
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I totally agree with you, it seems like traffic gets worse everyday in Atlanta and I see hundreds of cars with out of state tags every single day.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:53 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
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When I first read the title of the thread, I thought you meant indefinitely. I think 20-25 years is a good prediction of when population growth in the Sunbelt will start leveling out somewhat.
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Old 01-26-2011, 07:21 AM
 
Location: The City
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I agree that the trends will continue, I also think some smaller metros will grow faster and some of the larger will slow in the coming decades but this trend will continue and likely for longer than the 20 years but the longer term rapid growth may be in the places smaller to mid size now as real estate values etc rise in the larger areas making them less attractive than they are today
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
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While it may not end in the immediate future, it will have an end and will stabilize. There are two main reasons why people are moving south right now. First, there is a large population of Baby Boomers that are beginning to retire to previous vacation places. Second, and more important, is that a lot of the northern cities were hit hard during the last few decades by a large decline in blue-collar jobs such as manufacturing. Even the largest cities, like NYC, Boston, Chicago, etc had growth that was slow or even declining at times not so long ago, but a lot of that decline has been reversing. Northern cities are reinventing themselves with more diversified economies. People ultimately go where the jobs are. Things like the weather play little in that factor. After all, those claiming people leave the North because of long winters ignore the fact that that area had the largest population centers and biggest economic impact for 200 years of our nation's history, at a time when winters were even worse. Winter did not suddenly become an issue. And sorry South, your weather sucks just as bad during your long, miserably hot summer. Throw in the bugs, severe wx, tornadoes, and occasional hurricane, and they're about even. It's about jobs more than anything else.
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Suburbs
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Atlanta and Miami picked up steam in the last census. Interesting to know though what the economy did to those numbers. I see places like Asheville and Knoxville growing more rapidly. They are in many ways flying under the radar. As well as many of South Carolina's metro areas. Raleigh/Durham doesn't look to be slowing down anytime soon. I see the growth still occuring. But like many have said, in the next few decades stabalizing.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,487,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler87 View Post
Atlanta and Miami picked up steam in the last census. Interesting to know though what the economy did to those numbers. I see places like Asheville and Knoxville growing more rapidly. They are in many ways flying under the radar. As well as many of South Carolina's metro areas. Raleigh/Durham doesn't look to be slowing down anytime soon. I see the growth still occuring. But like many have said, in the next few decades stabalizing.
Not only that, but there is the assumption that continued growth in the South means that the North will decline. I think the two ares can grow simultaneously and we will most likely see exactly that in the coming years as northern cities start coming back. In fact, we have probably already hit bottom there given some of the reversals seen.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:56 AM
 
Location: High Point NC
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Sometimes I wish the migration would cease because of the Dilution of the culture and what made the region great. However I think people should have the right to live wherever they want, but I just hope the charms of the sunbelt (mainly the south) remain.
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:59 AM
 
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the Sunblet may be gaining population but its population isn't gaining wealth for some reason.

Personal Income in the 2000s: Top and Bottom Ten Metropolitan Areas | Newgeography.com

I was very surprised about Atlanta & Phoenix. Very low per capita income, and it's still falling.
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Old 01-26-2011, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,680,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EpicEast View Post
Sometimes I wish the migration would cease because of the Dilution of the culture and what made the region great. However I think people should have the right to live wherever they want, but I just hope the charms of the sunbelt (mainly the south) remain.
It won't. Its hard to keep charm when everything is being knocked down and paved over with bland urban/suburban sprawl.

The growth is great in the fact that it attracts much more businesses, cultures, jobs and attractions; however, it's bad because lots of Sunbelt cities weren't planned for this type of growth and with so much growth in such a short time; it's more unplanned development which becomes a burden later down the road.
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