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Old 03-09-2011, 12:18 PM
 
Location: West Paris
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America's population center is edging away from the Midwest, pulled by Hispanic growth in the Southwest, according to census figures. The historic shift is changing the nation's politics and even the traditional notion of the country's heartland – long the symbol of mainstream American beliefs and culture.

US Census Shows The West Becoming America's New 'Heartland,' Replacing Midwest Midwest
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
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The shifting center of population has been happening for decades, thats hardly news. -shrugs-
Although I do find it ironic that one of the least populated and most remote counties in Missouri is the predicted center of population.
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Old 03-09-2011, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Considering the East Coast has always had more people than anywhere in the nation, how would this affect the Midwest? We've never been the "population center".
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Old 03-09-2011, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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The west has one great achilles heal that will prevent much further growth, and possibly reverse thier population growth in a MAJOR way. Water is the resource the west lacks, and if a major drought ever occurs they will lose millions of people in a hurry. The midwestern areas that everyone has ran from will become the place to be again, and the migrations will reverse. The western great lakes and the Mississippi and Ohio river areas have more water than anyone will ever need. The salvation of old midwest towns like Chicago, Detroit, Milwalkee, St louis and Cincinatti will be a western drought.
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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So is the 'Heartland' designation a reflection of population or 'mainstream American beliefs and culture'? If it is the latter, the heartland isn't moving anywhere.
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: CT
1,215 posts, read 2,191,727 times
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The "Heartland" has nothing to do with culture or the center of population, they're confusing the term with the idea of "Middle America". The Heartland is the middle interior of a country, that's about it, and that's what the Midwest is, you can't really change that.

You could also have an industrial or agricultural Heartland that doesn't have to be in the middle of anything but a center of something like the Ruhr was in Germany for industry which the Midwest has also been for the US, though the Northeast was where the Industrial Revolution began in this country and it took off there as well. Either way, the industry part is largely played down now because it suffered so much but the agricultural aspect is still true. Anyway, the center of population moving further only symbolizes a long slow "balancing out" of the population in this country with the largely "empty" west "filling up".
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
So is the 'Heartland' designation a reflection of population or 'mainstream American beliefs and culture'? If it is the latter, the heartland isn't moving anywhere.
Quote:
Originally Posted by missRoxyhart View Post
The "Heartland" has nothing to do with culture or the center of population, they're confusing the term with the idea of "Middle America". The Heartland is the middle interior of a country, that's about it, and that's what the Midwest is, you can't really change that.

You could also have an industrial or agricultural Heartland that doesn't have to be in the middle of anything but a center of something like the Ruhr was in Germany for industry which the Midwest has also been for the US, though the Northeast was where the Industrial Revolution began in this country and it took off there as well. Either way, the industry part is largely played down now because it suffered so much but the agricultural aspect is still true. Anyway, the center of population moving further only symbolizes a long slow "balancing out" of the population in this country with the largely "empty" west "filling up".
Both of these posts are quite correct!
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Isn't Texas in the middle too
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alacran View Post
Isn't Texas in the middle too
Of the country?
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:58 PM
 
Location: CT
1,215 posts, read 2,191,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alacran View Post
Isn't Texas in the middle too
Kinda, more to the left if you ask me but the Midwest isn't exactly centered either and the majority of the Texas population is in the east.



Here's the Midwest, pretty much what I would consider the Heartland. I guess I should say that even though the Heartland is simply the middle interior of a country, history does a play a bit of a role here because as the country grew up the Midwest was more centered than it is now, as you can see it's a bit to the right. It's still generally the middle center of the country though. But for that reason some areas are left out today.



States like Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma and parts of or much of Texas are ones I might include in the "Heartland" even if some people might not consider them that way for historical reasons. The Midwest itself has more backing it as the Heartland than just position, it was the industrial Heartland and still is the agricultural Heartland but position is most important because that's at the heart of what a geographical Heartland is. The point is, culture and center of population have little to nothing to do with where the Heartland is.
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