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Old 07-25-2007, 01:29 AM
 
58 posts, read 228,782 times
Reputation: 29

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i have googled, called numbers everything i can think of
my family is from us but i am canadian
i want to get dual citizenship so i can relocate to the states

Anyone know how i go about this?

Thanks so much, in advance
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Old 07-25-2007, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Ohio, but moving to El Paso, TX August/September
431 posts, read 1,212,227 times
Reputation: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by albianstar View Post
i have googled, called numbers everything i can think of
my family is from us but i am canadian
i want to get dual citizenship so i can relocate to the states

Anyone know how i go about this?

Thanks so much, in advance
Call the consulate of the country you were born in. Whether you can get dual citizenship or not depends on which country you were originally born in and then what country you go to, but the country that makes the rule is the one you were born in.

Here's 3 examples to make it a little clearer.

My hubby was born in Holland. Dutch people can have dual citizenship if they live in another country and have established lives there. Therefore, my husband can get US citizenship and he will not have to give up his Dutch citizenship. He can have dual.

For me, even if we moved to Holland, I would not be able to get dual citizenship. The US does not allow it (and I was born in the US), unless with specific countries (like Israel) and Holland isn't one of those countries. So if we went there, I'd stay American or go Dutch, but I wouldn't be able to be dual.

Our kids were born in the US. In the US, if a parent is foreign, depending on the country, the kids can also be dual. The big factor here is the parent has to have citizenship with another country (or be dual). My boys do have dual citizenship, but in the US, if you were born in the US, you can only have dual until a certain age and then you must declare one nationality or another. I think the age is something like 28 but don't quote me on it.

So 3 different scenarios. Bottom line is you need to check with a Canadian embassy or consular office to find out what the rules for their citizens are.
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Old 07-30-2007, 05:41 PM
 
645 posts, read 1,285,340 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjbulls View Post
Call the consulate of the country you were born in. Whether you can get dual citizenship or not depends on which country you were originally born in and then what country you go to, but the country that makes the rule is the one you were born in.

Here's 3 examples to make it a little clearer.

My hubby was born in Holland. Dutch people can have dual citizenship if they live in another country and have established lives there. Therefore, my husband can get US citizenship and he will not have to give up his Dutch citizenship. He can have dual.

For me, even if we moved to Holland, I would not be able to get dual citizenship. The US does not allow it (and I was born in the US), unless with specific countries (like Israel) and Holland isn't one of those countries. So if we went there, I'd stay American or go Dutch, but I wouldn't be able to be dual.

Our kids were born in the US. In the US, if a parent is foreign, depending on the country, the kids can also be dual. The big factor here is the parent has to have citizenship with another country (or be dual). My boys do have dual citizenship, but in the US, if you were born in the US, you can only have dual until a certain age and then you must declare one nationality or another. I think the age is something like 28 but don't quote me on it.

So 3 different scenarios. Bottom line is you need to check with a Canadian embassy or consular office to find out what the rules for their citizens are.
Just wanted to add a correction here that you as a US citizen can become a dual citizen. There are many people (US citizens by birth) who have obtained dual citizenship and it's perfectly fine as long as the second country allows it. Also, if you're born with dual citizenship in the US, you don't have to choose, you can remain a dual citizen for life.
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:20 PM
 
2,866 posts, read 4,209,783 times
Reputation: 1632
Stockholm is right, and it applies to most countries. The US does not recognize dual citizenship; if you qualify to be a US citizen, you can be one. If you also qualify to be a citizen elsewhere, no problem. The citizenship laws of other countries have no bearing on the citizenship laws of the US.
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Old 04-20-2009, 11:44 AM
 
1 posts, read 3,917 times
Reputation: 10
I need to know about Voluntary departure and if someone uses this option to go back when can they return to the US?????
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