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Old 03-23-2011, 09:04 AM
 
Location: New York NY
4,263 posts, read 6,343,100 times
Reputation: 9056

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Is it just the lack of jobs? Or the quality of life? The weather? Racial animosity? Too expensive? All of the above? Is the reason for population loss specific to each city? Is the 2010 Census data just plain wrong? Where ar these people going? To the suburbs? Out of state?

Is there some overriding reason that would account for the

Loss of 250,000 people in Detroit
Loss of 200,000 in Chicago
Loss of 80,00 in Cleveland
Loss of 40,000 in St. Louis

(For the record of other big Midwestern cities only ones that showed a population gain (small) that I saw were Milwaukee and Minneapolis)
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Old 03-23-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,696 posts, read 4,529,766 times
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Depends on the city. Lots of people moving to the suburbs. Lots of cities are getting rid of a lot of their unattractive public housing. Its not expensive. Quality of Life is fine. Jobs are lacking depending on city, industry, etc. all over the country. The weather wouldn't suddenly cause people to leave. Racial animosity???...No.
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Old 03-23-2011, 09:23 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
Reputation: 1798
The metro areas of Chicago & St. Louis always gained population. So people aren't fleeing the area, but simply moving to the suburbs.
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Old 03-23-2011, 09:39 AM
 
976 posts, read 1,878,392 times
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your numbers are incorrect. st. louis lost 29,000, not 40,000. its metro increased in population. both milwaukee and minneapolis also posted population losses, although they were much smaller. post your sources, you have the wrong info.
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Old 03-23-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,310,925 times
Reputation: 2017
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Is it just the lack of jobs? Or the quality of life? The weather? Racial animosity? Too expensive? All of the above? Is the reason for population loss specific to each city? Is the 2010 Census data just plain wrong? Where ar these people going? To the suburbs? Out of state?

Is there some overriding reason that would account for the

Loss of 250,000 people in Detroit
Loss of 200,000 in Chicago
Loss of 80,00 in Cleveland
Loss of 40,000 in St. Louis

(For the record of other big Midwestern cities only ones that showed a population gain (small) that I saw were Milwaukee and Minneapolis)
On the good side for Chicago, central core neighborhoods saw substantial increases.

Loop +78.7%
Near southside +124%
Near Westside + 18.7%
Near Northside +10.5%
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Old 03-23-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Actually, this phenomenon is common among many of what I'll call the "older" cities where population growth of the city proper is limited by its adjacent incorporated suburbs. If you look, most of those cites with dramatic growth are what I'll call the "sprawl cities" which annex further and further from their core: Las Vegas, Phoenix, the Texas cites, Atlanta, etc. Much of their growth, while within the city limts, is in areas that have a suburban feel. Look at this picutre of part of incorporated Phoenix:


Suburban Phoenix, Ariz. | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dandc/3624529133/ - broken link)

A better measure for me is the growth (or loss) in the metro area. While things such as a healthier industrial base, cheaper cost of living and promotion of retirement communities have favored the sunbelt metros in the past few decades, you'll see the loss in the mid-west isn't as dramatic as it appears when you only look at the hemmed in city itself. Some of the great American cites are in the mid-west. I hope they are able to capitalize on their strengths and once again become strong and vibrant anchors for their metro areas.
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:01 AM
 
Location: New York NY
4,263 posts, read 6,343,100 times
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Correction is right on Milwaukee and Minneapolis. Census shows them both with declines of less than 1% in the city proper. Not growing but essentuially stable.

The St. Louis figure was typo. My bad. I should have typed 30,00, not 40,000. (I'm dealing in round numbers here) .

Still, I think the point is petty much the same. Folks are leaving thse cities -- or to phrase it differently --they're not coing in. So you're faced with the same question: Why not?
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:17 AM
 
248 posts, read 526,980 times
Reputation: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Is it just the lack of jobs? Or the quality of life? The weather? Racial animosity? Too expensive? All of the above? Is the reason for population loss specific to each city? Is the 2010 Census data just plain wrong? Where ar these people going? To the suburbs? Out of state?

Is there some overriding reason that would account for the

Loss of 250,000 people in Detroit
Loss of 200,000 in Chicago
Loss of 80,00 in Cleveland
Loss of 40,000 in St. Louis

(For the record of other big Midwestern cities only ones that showed a population gain (small) that I saw were Milwaukee and Minneapolis)

If you are going to go on record make sure your information is correct. These are NOT the only 2 cities that has shown an increase. Columbus increased by about 75000, Indinapolis increased by about 40000, and Kansas City saw an increase as well.
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,134,238 times
Reputation: 2384
The same thing WILL happen to the sunbelt cities once they completely fill in their city centers. Most places that are fully developed don't tend to increase in population anymore, except in some instances like NYC where demand to be in the core is so high. The more substantial losses in Chicago and St. Louis probably have a lot to do with politics and socio-economics. The older, run-down areas of older cities in the Midwest/Northeast just aren't desireable places to be anymore, and the cost to rebuild them far exceeds the return one would get, so people abandon areas.
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Old 03-23-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Folks are leaving thse cities -- or to phrase it differently --they're not coing in. So you're faced with the same question: Why not?
Did you read my post above?
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