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Old 03-26-2011, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Murphy, TX
645 posts, read 2,612,689 times
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One thing I have noticed is that people seem to be very much separated into socio-economic classes. Rich people live in thier area of town, middle class in another area, and low class in their area. Usually rich guys don't have good friends with poor or middle class people. Friends often then to be of similar socio-economic background. Also, schools are also divided up that.

Now my question if there places in USA where you will millionaires in visiting people who live in poverty to thier parties? Or middle class people hanging out with people in the dangerous/slums? Also, do rich elite kids go to the same schools as middle income or low income people?
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Old 03-26-2011, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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You've noticed that? I guess there probably isn't one where this truly happens. I'm sure lots of cities, or at least their residents will try and say they are like that, but I don't think it's plausible anywhere in the world, and if it happens, it's down to select people, not the city. I'm sure some rich parents may choose to send their kids to a state school, but that would be on a family by family basis, not by city.
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Old 03-26-2011, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
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I have a few real friends that real (and old money) millionaires in NY and CA. I'm just a working class stiff. I think that being an Artist and a member of rowing/sailing clubs helps bridge that divide.
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Old 03-26-2011, 04:24 PM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,191,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unseengundam View Post
One thing I have noticed is that people seem to be very much separated into socio-economic classes. Rich people live in thier area of town, middle class in another area, and low class in their area. Usually rich guys don't have good friends with poor or middle class people. Friends often then to be of similar socio-economic background. Also, schools are also divided up that.

Now my question if there places in USA where you will millionaires in visiting people who live in poverty to thier parties? Or middle class people hanging out with people in the dangerous/slums? Also, do rich elite kids go to the same schools as middle income or low income people?
I disagree that people always live in neighborhoods strictly according to their income. The whole concept of gentrification involves those first pioneers of ballsy middle class White folks living in a blighted inner city area. Also, my family has always been middle class but we lived right smack in the middle of the ghetto in San Francisco when I was a kid in the 80's and early 90's. It wasn't that bad to be honest. My brother, sister and I didn't even know we lived in what was considered to be a poor ghetto area even when we were well old enough to know at 10-12 years old. Mind you that many kids from broken homes grow up very fast in the hood with nine year olds selling crack to support their whole family. We didn't have the freedom to even walk down the street in our own neighborhood or visit the park across the street, but many people that live in big cities don't have the freedom of dumb asses who jog aimlessly around neighborhoods in generic suburbia. But even when we were living in the hood, we didn't really associate with the people who lived at homicide central a block away in the projects. In many lower income and ghetto areas in the United States, hard-working law-abiding lower middle class and working class folks and forced to live next door to drug dealers, thugs, gang bangers and murderers. My old neighborhood was a perfect example:

OCEAN VIEW / Neighborhood reclaims its mean streets - SFGate

However, I've noticed that people of different classes may have other fraternal bonds that tie them together socially. From what I've noticed, all across the country, many young Black kids tend to hang out with other Black kids from the poorest most ghettoized areas of a neighborhood or a town even if they live in a nearby area that is more middle class and have parents that have decent jobs. Just an observation. Where I live now in Maryland is right outside the wealthiest Black majority county in America, Prince George's County. PG County has the total spectrum of all incomes of Black folks. Many Blacks from the poorer and rougher areas around Southeast DC may occasionally mingle and befriend more upper middle class Blacks in PG County from what I've seen.

Last edited by goldenchild08; 03-26-2011 at 04:41 PM..
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:00 PM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenchild08 View Post
I disagree that people always live in neighborhoods strictly according to their income. The whole concept of gentrification involves those first pioneers of ballsy middle class White folks living in a blighted inner city area. Also, my family has always been middle class but we lived right smack in the middle of the ghetto in San Francisco when I was a kid in the 80's and early 90's. It wasn't that bad to be honest. My brother, sister and I didn't even know we lived in what was considered to be a poor ghetto area even when we were well old enough to know at 10-12 years old. Mind you that many kids from broken homes grow up very fast in the hood with nine year olds selling crack to support their whole family. We didn't have the freedom to even walk down the street in our own neighborhood or visit the park across the street, but many people that live in big cities don't have the freedom of dumb asses who jog aimlessly around neighborhoods in generic suburbia. But even when we were living in the hood, we didn't really associate with the people who lived at homicide central a block away in the projects. In many lower income and ghetto areas in the United States, hard-working law-abiding lower middle class and working class folks and forced to live next door to drug dealers, thugs, gang bangers and murderers. My old neighborhood was a perfect example:

OCEAN VIEW / Neighborhood reclaims its mean streets - SFGate

However, I've noticed that people of different classes may have other fraternal bonds that tie them together socially. From what I've noticed, all across the country, many young Black kids tend to hang out with other Black kids from the poorest most ghettoized areas of a neighborhood or a town even if they live in a nearby area that is more middle class and have parents that have decent jobs. Just an observation. Where I live now in Maryland is right outside the wealthiest Black majority county in America, Prince George's County. PG County has the total spectrum of all incomes of Black folks. Many Blacks from the poorer and rougher areas around Southeast DC may occasionally mingle and befriend


more upper middle class Blacks in PG County from what I've seen.
Another good example of this is a good sized mostly Black church. That's how my church was here in Syracuse when I was a kid. It ranged from business owners to single moms living in projects and with kids that went to the urban, private and suburban high schools in the area. You had kids graduating from college out of a variety of environments too.
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,310,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unseengundam View Post
One thing I have noticed is that people seem to be very much separated into socio-economic classes. Rich people live in thier area of town, middle class in another area, and low class in their area. Usually rich guys don't have good friends with poor or middle class people. Friends often then to be of similar socio-economic background. Also, schools are also divided up that.

Now my question if there places in USA where you will millionaires in visiting people who live in poverty to thier parties? Or middle class people hanging out with people in the dangerous/slums? Also, do rich elite kids go to the same schools as middle income or low income people?
MIllionaires living next door to the poor? Rare

Cabrini Projects in Chicago was unique in a way that it was a cesspool of extreme poverty(by US standards) surrounded by million dollar plus condos and high rises. The low rise row homes section of Cabrini are still there.

Middle Class living next door to the poor? Common

The typical middle class person isn't wealthy enough to completely separate him or herself from poor/working class people. The category speaks for itself, a middle ground between rich and poor. In ghettos and high crime neighborhoods, not all of the people there are poor. This is true for the pioneers who set off gentrification and the remaining middle class people in these type of communities who refuse to move to greener pasture, despite the community has become crime ridden.

Last edited by Chicagoland60426; 03-26-2011 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:14 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
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About the only place that comes quickly to mind is in ranch country such as Montana...

A very good friend was raised on a ranch in Montana, off the beaten path. Her family goes back several generations.

Each year when she visits she always comments neighbors are just neighbors... doesn't matter if you own thousands of acres or how many cattle you have... the more remote, the more sociable people are... like checking on each other when roads are impassable due to severe weather or if someone needs tending too or help with groceries and can't make it to town.

She did say the last time she was there... someone paid a lot of money for a spread and doesn't mix with anyone... then they don't live there either...

I would say church or service clubs have a good mix also...

I belong to the Model A Ford Club of America.... members come from all backgrounds and social stations in life... Off the top of my head I can name just as many millionaires as I can retired living mostly from Social Security...

I think the key is people having a common interest that brings them together and city living often isn't it because most city neighborhoods are stratified by income.
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:30 PM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,752,084 times
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Small towns are that way, at least the living side by side and the schools. Don't know about socialization. In the country in TN You'll see mcmansions beside run down trailers but the mansion will have a big yard.

I can point you to a few places in Knoxville where the very wealthy live near the working class, but these are unpretentious rich people. You wouldn't know it by looking at the house.

Come to think of it - for a while there, the owners of Esquire magazine - that epistle to upscale urbanity, lived near my neighborhood in an enclave surrounded by very poor white folks.

Last edited by creeksitter; 03-27-2011 at 02:31 PM.. Reason: sp
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
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New Orleans is mixed like that, million dollar mansions next door to hoods. Uptown is a nice neighborhood which was plagued with project buildings they recently tore down. I think one was Calliope, not sure of the others. I'm sure WestbankNOLA will be here to clear my post up.
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:02 PM
 
1,085 posts, read 2,109,470 times
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AFAIK, what you're asking is beside the point. The question for me is why Americans continue to allow an ever greater share of income to be consolidated in the top 1% of the population without any fundamental tax reforms. I know there are a lot of delusional people making 50K a year who somehow think they'll be Donald Trump one day, so they resist reform - think again!
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