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Old 04-27-2011, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Jersey
1,893 posts, read 1,599,566 times
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I've always considered it to be PA, NJ, NY and to a lesser extent MD and DE. The Northeast is made up of two seperate sub regions, the Mid-Atlantic and New England. You could probably split New England into Northern and Southern halfs and the Mid Atlantic region into the the coastal area and interior area.
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:37 PM
 
Location: The City
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The national weather refers to NYC and Philly as the Mid-Atlantic and/or Northeast basically interchangeably. Honestly as a resident and one who grew up in this area I always thought i lived in the Mid Atlantic, in fact until thread i never thought it would be a question. Mid Atlantic or North East for these two cities to me were always accurate
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:44 PM
 
434 posts, read 458,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The national weather refers to NYC and Philly as the Mid-Atlantic and/or Northeast basically interchangeably. Honestly as a resident and one who grew up in this area I always thought i lived in the Mid Atlantic, in fact until thread i never thought it would be a question. Mid Atlantic or North East for these two cities to me were always accurate
They often refer to/show Virginia as Northeastern also.
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Old 04-27-2011, 02:53 PM
 
828 posts, read 607,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbergen View Post
i tend to agree with this. my definition of mid-atlantic consists of areas along the eastern seaboard where the cultural north and south overlap. these are places that are at the southern end of the modern day bos-wash megalopolis, but historically/geographically were considered part of the south, and even to this day retain faint cultural, linguistic, and historical echoes of their southern past.

maryland, delaware (minus wilmington, perhaps), washington dc, and northern virginia fit into this mold. philly and nyc most definitely do not.

when i was a kid growing up in the nyc metro, we took frequent trips down I-95 south to delaware and maryland - sometimes to baltimore and dc, and other times to the beaches and countryside of the delmarva peninsula. and without fail, i always felt i was entering a different region once we passed wilmington, delaware (the northernmost part of the state) and approached the border of northern delaware (newark, de) and northeastern maryland (elkton, md). there was just a different culture and "feel" that was always perceptible to me. not to mention, the farmers and other locals whom we'd buy produce from in the delmarva peninsula had some very noticeable southern accents - different from what you'd hear in georgia or mississippi, of course, but also completely unlike any country accents i'd ever heard in the rural parts of ny, nj, or pa. basically, they didn't sound like northeasterners.

and that brings me back to my main point - while delaware, maryland, and dc/nova are absolutely part of the bos-wash megalopolis, they're not what i'd consider northeastern. some people would have you believe that the two terms are completely interchangeable, but in my opinion they are distinct regions that are often confused due to a large area of overlap.

to me, bos-wash is more of an economic term that ties together the coastal northeast (philly-nyc-boston) with the mid-atlantic (baltimore and dc), whereas northeastern refers to geography and a shared history and culture. sure, there are differences between philly, nyc, boston, and the various smaller cities of the region like trenton, new haven, hartford, and providence, but despite that, it's pretty tough to deny that there's a common underlying thread. historically, demographically, and culturally, they're northeastern.

meanwhile, i look at the mid-atlantic as more of a neutral spot, especially in the dc metro. baltimore has always felt to me like a city a somewhat stronger connection with northern culture, but in the end, it still feels part of a distinct, different region than the northeast.

ultimately, the problem is that mid-atlantic is an imprecise and arguably obsolete term that has different boundaries, depending on the source. in addition, it has sometimes been used as a catch-all term to delineate areas that don't fit neatly into one category or another, which is bound to create confusion.

for instance, the u.s. census bureau defines ny, nj, and pa as the entirety of the mid-atlantic, while delaware, maryland, dc, and virginia are categorized as being part of the south. other maps and references i've seen list everything from maryland and delaware down to north carolina as part of the mid-atlantic. still others list all of the states mentioned, plus west virginia.

personally, i'd much rather see ny, nj, and pa rebranded as a different region altogether to distinguish it from de/md/dc/nova. perhaps "north atlantic" might work since these states lie north of the mid-atlantic states.
+1 I 100% agree
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ area
5,873 posts, read 3,309,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
I've always considered it to be PA, NJ, NY and to a lesser extent MD and DE. The Northeast is made up of two seperate sub regions, the Mid-Atlantic and New England. You could probably split New England into Northern and Southern halfs and the Mid Atlantic region into the the coastal area and interior area.
I completely agree.
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:12 PM
 
Location: The City
18,779 posts, read 15,220,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA7cities View Post
They often refer to/show Virginia as Northeastern also.

Well I have thought of the Philly area as Mid Atlantic - never even questioned it really. On the Jersey side it seems like half the places are named Mid Atlantic this or that

Without ever giving it too much thought I would generally think the Mid Atlantic goes from NY to VA
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:59 PM
 
2,758 posts, read 3,298,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbergen View Post
i tend to agree with this. my definition of mid-atlantic consists of areas along the eastern seaboard where the cultural north and south overlap. these are places that are at the southern end of the modern day bos-wash megalopolis, but historically/geographically were considered part of the south, and even to this day retain faint cultural, linguistic, and historical echoes of their southern past.

maryland, delaware (minus wilmington, perhaps), washington dc, and northern virginia fit into this mold. philly and nyc most definitely do not.

and without fail, i always felt i was entering a different region once we passed wilmington, delaware (the northernmost part of the state) and approached the border of northern delaware (newark, de) and northeastern maryland (elkton, md). there was just a different culture and "feel" that was always perceptible to me. not to mention, the farmers and other locals whom we'd buy produce from in the delmarva peninsula had some very noticeable southern accents - different from what you'd hear in georgia or mississippi, of course, but also completely unlike any country accents i'd ever heard in the rural parts of ny, nj, or pa. basically, they didn't sound like northeasterners.

and that brings me back to my main point - while delaware, maryland, and dc/nova are absolutely part of the bos-wash megalopolis, they're not what i'd consider northeastern. some people would have you believe that the two terms are completely interchangeable, but in my opinion they are distinct regions that are often confused due to a large area of overlap.

to me, bos-wash is more of an economic term that ties together the coastal northeast (philly-nyc-boston) with the mid-atlantic (baltimore and dc), whereas northeastern refers to geography and a shared history and culture. sure, there are differences between philly, nyc, boston, and the various smaller cities of the region like trenton, new haven, hartford, and providence, but despite that, it's pretty tough to deny that there's a common underlying thread. historically, demographically, and culturally, they're northeastern.

meanwhile, i look at the mid-atlantic as more of a neutral spot, especially in the dc metro. baltimore has always felt to me like a city a somewhat stronger connection with northern culture, but in the end, it still feels part of a distinct, different region than the northeast.

ultimately, the problem is that mid-atlantic is an imprecise and arguably obsolete term that has different boundaries, depending on the source. in addition, it has sometimes been used as a catch-all term to delineate areas that don't fit neatly into one category or another, which is bound to create confusion.

for instance, the u.s. census bureau defines ny, nj, and pa as the entirety of the mid-atlantic, while delaware, maryland, dc, and virginia are categorized as being part of the south. other maps and references i've seen list everything from maryland and delaware down to north carolina as part of the mid-atlantic. still others list all of the states mentioned, plus west virginia.

personally, i'd much rather see ny, nj, and pa rebranded as a different region altogether to distinguish it from de/md/dc/nova. perhaps "north atlantic" might work since these states lie north of the mid-atlantic states.
I could not have said this any better. I agree with all of this. I like the idea of NY,NJ, & PA being called the "North Atlantic." You already have New England and the South Atlantic should be just FLA, GA, and SC. I think that the M-A should just be DE down to NC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Well I have thought of the Philly area as Mid Atlantic - never even questioned it really. On the Jersey side it seems like half the places are named Mid Atlantic this or that

Without ever giving it too much thought I would generally think the Mid Atlantic goes from NY to VA
Interesting, what do you think about Coastal NC?



To me (yeah, I know it doesn't mean that much), this area is like a continuation of VA and we all know that the Chesapeake region's the M-A. There are even places in NC that has the Mid-Atlantic name in it. What do you think?
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Old 04-27-2011, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Center City
3,798 posts, read 2,936,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Alleyne View Post
Interesting, what do you think about Coastal NC?

To me (yeah, I know it doesn't mean that much), this area is like a continuation of VA and we all know that the Chesapeake region's the M-A. There are even places in NC that has the Mid-Atlantic name in it. What do you think?
IMO, once you leave Delmarva via the Chesapeake Bay-Bridge and enter Hampton Roads, you're in the southeast - different accents, grits, peanut farms, the works. The folks who live there feel they are southerners, as well. As I define it, coastal NC is therefore also southern. Your map has Wilmington on it - definitely a southern town.
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Old 04-27-2011, 05:37 PM
 
1,032 posts, read 1,917,008 times
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The middle colonies were NY, PA, NJ and DE. That is one definition of Mid-Atlantic.
The other one is centered around Baltimore-D.C.

If it's not New England... and it's not the south, it's Mid-Atlantic to me. This is anything between D.C. and SW CT.

Although it spans many states, it is still a very very tiny region geographically. I don't know why people would want it to be smaller.
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Old 04-27-2011, 05:54 PM
 
Location: The City
18,779 posts, read 15,220,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
IMO, once you leave Delmarva via the Chesapeake Bay-Bridge and enter Hampton Roads, you're in the southeast - different accents, grits, peanut farms, the works. The folks who live there feel they are southerners, as well. As I define it, coastal NC is therefore also southern. Your map has Wilmington on it - definitely a southern town.

I would mostly agree and as much as I love OBX NC to me is definately southern or southeastern. Though these days the summer in OBX seems to be mostly filled with folks from MD, PA, NJ, and OH

One thing I would say is that the Delmarva penisula may almost have its own micro culture. Not sure where is best fits; especially pronounced south of Salsbury MD and more chickens and one of the more interesting odors to experience.
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