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Old 05-16-2011, 08:37 AM
 
13 posts, read 32,487 times
Reputation: 24

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I'm not trolling...I genuinely want to know how you all stand it.
I mean, it's more expensive than almost everywhere else, and I've heard the phrase "tax hell" to describe it as well. The winters are also hellish and harsh, and I just don't see why people want to live there anymore. The people are all rude and cold. I can see why the Southeast is now the most populated region in the U.S., but I don't see why so many people stay in Northeast, besides family. If it weren't for their families, I think more people would move away. The cities are crumbling, not to mention the states themselves. Why don't you all just move away? I can't imagine that people actually like, let alone love living there. People that say that they love that part of the U.S., I think are just trying to justify living there and paying enormous taxes.

 
Old 05-16-2011, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
3,082 posts, read 3,732,777 times
Reputation: 3556
Of course, this is all just one person's opinion, right?

Actually, and again, this is just my opinion, the Northeast is one awesome place, and I can definitely see why people love it there. The cities are not crumbling, they are actually quite beautiful and filled with character, something you're just not going to find in the newer McCities in other parts of the country. The sense of history and identity is stronger in New England than anywhere else in the country, IMHO, and it's easy for me to see why people love calling places like Boston and Newport home. The COL is high for a reason, primarily that people are drawn to the area and are willing to pay those prices to be there. That's basic economics 101. If people keep pouring into the Southeast, the COL will escalate there too. Higher demand = higher cost. Simple.

I love the Southeast too, but New England has a vibe all its own, and so many great, all-American attractions, universities, cities, etc. that it will always attract people. Have you ever seen Cape Cod? I'm guessing that you haven't. And believe it or not, some people would say that the summers in the Southeast are just as "hellish and harsh" as the winters in the Northeast, and some people would rather freeze than bake. Again, it's all a matter of personal opinion. And apparently, a lot of people don't share your opinion, or the Northeast wouldn't be filled with people who love living there.
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:04 AM
 
16,623 posts, read 14,353,196 times
Reputation: 11492
the south, or the sunbelt, or America's "high growth areas" aren't for everyone. In the south, at least, one thing you'll notice is that we don't have very many densely populated small towns. people tend to be spread out across the countryside with long stretches of rural highway between them. The concept of the "rural community" is far stronger in New England than it is in the sun belt.

Or, if you liked major cities, and for whateever reason you enjoyed living in a sea of ethnicities ... amongst a million Pakistanis, Nigerians, Haitians, Jews, Russians, Italians, Albanians, Ethiopians, Chinese, Indians, Eskimos... or any one of the dozens and dozens of ethnic areas of the northeast... then you can't find that many places in the sun belt, either.
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
2,548 posts, read 2,165,149 times
Reputation: 1800
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleBryant View Post
I'm not trolling...I genuinely want to know how you all stand it.
I mean, it's more expensive than almost everywhere else, and I've heard the phrase "tax hell" to describe it as well. The winters are also hellish and harsh, and I just don't see why people want to live there anymore. The people are all rude and cold. I can see why the Southeast is now the most populated region in the U.S., but I don't see why so many people stay in Northeast, besides family. If it weren't for their families, I think more people would move away. The cities are crumbling, not to mention the states themselves. Why don't you all just move away? I can't imagine that people actually like, let alone love living there. People that say that they love that part of the U.S., I think are just trying to justify living there and paying enormous taxes.
Haha. Maybe they like huge, densely populated urban cities with amenities that blow any southern or sunbelt city out of the water. To say all the people of the northeast are cold and rude is just a gross generalization. Many people like 4 seasons. Taxes vary depending on where you live. You should know all of these things
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
9,994 posts, read 8,484,109 times
Reputation: 6134
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElleBryant View Post
I'm not trolling...I genuinely want to know how you all stand it.
I mean, it's more expensive than almost everywhere else, and I've heard the phrase "tax hell" to describe it as well. The winters are also hellish and harsh, and I just don't see why people want to live there anymore. The people are all rude and cold. I can see why the Southeast is now the most populated region in the U.S., but I don't see why so many people stay in Northeast, besides family. If it weren't for their families, I think more people would move away. The cities are crumbling, not to mention the states themselves. Why don't you all just move away? I can't imagine that people actually like, let alone love living there. People that say that they love that part of the U.S., I think are just trying to justify living there and paying enormous taxes.
Reasons for living in the northeast? Hmm.. how about:

- the most urban and developed region in the U.S.

- the most inter-connected region in the U.S.

- the best universities in the U.S. (and even the world)

- the highest gdp overall

- the largest and #1 most important city in the U.S.

- the capital of the U.S. (this is worth repeating too)

- the birthplace of the U.S.

- relative proximity to the largest cities in Canada

- relative proximity to Europe

- beautiful natural scenery (mountains, beaches, forests, lakes, rivers, farms, etc.)

I'll stop there for now, and let others figure out why people wouldn't want to live in the northeast given its advantages. :-)

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 05-16-2011 at 10:01 AM..
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:40 AM
 
Location: DC Suburbs of Maryland (by way of PA)
2,961 posts, read 4,222,271 times
Reputation: 2270
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
Of course, this is all just one person's opinion, right?

Actually, and again, this is just my opinion, the Northeast is one awesome place, and I can definitely see why people love it there. The cities are not crumbling, they are actually quite beautiful and filled with character, something you're just not going to find in the newer McCities in other parts of the country. The sense of history and identity is stronger in New England than anywhere else in the country, IMHO, and it's easy for me to see why people love calling places like Boston and Newport home. The COL is high for a reason, primarily that people are drawn to the area and are willing to pay those prices to be there. That's basic economics 101. If people keep pouring into the Southeast, the COL will escalate there too. Higher demand = higher cost. Simple.
The only think I would disagree with here is your statement about New England having the strongest sense of identity and history in the US; I think the Northeast in general has a very strong sense of historical identity, which would also include the immense of history of the mid-Atlantic states. Moreover, while other regions might not have as much history, a strong sense of identity can absolutely be found in other parts of the country.

Otherwise, I think you're absolutely right. Other than the fact that the OP is not accounting for higher salaries for higher costs-of-living. Insofar as demand drives cost, clearly there are plenty of people that prefer to live in the Northeast.
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
3,082 posts, read 3,732,777 times
Reputation: 3556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
The only think I would disagree with here is your statement about New England have the strongest sense of identity and history; I think the Northeast in general has a very strong sense of historical identity, which would also include the immense of history of the mid-Atlantic states. Moreover, while other regions might not have as much history, a strong sense of identity can absolutely be found in other parts of the country.

Otherwise, I think you're absolutely right. Other than the fact that the OP is not accounting for higher salaries for higher costs-of-living. Insofar as demand drives cost, clearly there are plenty of people that choose to live in the Northeast.
Yeah, I think you're right. What I meant to imply was "historical identity", not just basic identity. There are way too many other parts of our wonderful country that have very strong identities, and I didn't mean to imply that they are any less important or wonderful places to live.
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:53 AM
 
16,623 posts, read 14,353,196 times
Reputation: 11492
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
Many people like 4 seasons.
just because some other parts of the country have 4 warmer seasons, does not necessarily mean that they lack 4 seasons. In the east, it is really only the tropical areas of south Florida that lack 4 seasons. The subtropical southeast, for example, has equally large temperature changes over a yearly span.

For me, a place like Boston only has two seasons. April to September is "not freezing your ass off", and October to March is "freezing your ass off." There is no summer, only Winter and Springfall.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
- the most inter-connected region in the U.S.

- the birthplace of the U.S.
i don't know about these either. i don't know how one defines the "Birthplace" of the US. Seems to me that the northeast and the southeast were equally involved. I'm not sure if it's the "most interconnected" region, either. How would you define that? Last time I was up north the highways were a catastrophic nightmare. Toll booths and traffic everywhere. I found it to be a pain in the ass just to get from Baltimore to NY, which isn't very far at all. If you're talking about global interconnectedness.. well, America's biggest seaport is in Louisiana, and the world's biggest airport is in Georgia.

Last edited by le roi; 05-16-2011 at 10:11 AM..
 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:56 AM
Status: "Write the vision and make it plain" (set 28 days ago)
 
31,882 posts, read 37,849,021 times
Reputation: 6431
What the OP is also unaware of is that there are affordable areas in the NE too.

Another thing I like about the NE is that you can find nice, walkable and somewhat dense smaller communities. Many even have quite a bit going on and are great alternatives to those that want those qualities in a smaller package. Many of these places are close to bigger cities and allow for options in terms of entertainment, pace of life and things to do.
 
Old 05-16-2011, 10:07 AM
 
2,060 posts, read 3,535,540 times
Reputation: 1378
Here we go again. Another NE versus SE post. Gosh I have no clue where this thread will go...
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