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Old 05-23-2011, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Over the years I've come to notice that there are certain words that I and others around me use that are pronounced differently. For example, Probably. When used in full sentence, it can sometimes be said as something like pry, but with a faint e sound at the end, although when used alone as a single word response it is most always the full pronunciation. Then there are the more well known ones, such as not fully pronouncing ts in words or not saying gs at the end of ing words, and then I don't know becomes I dunno etc.

So, I was wondering if anything like this existed in your day to day speech?
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:14 PM
 
Location: You Ta Zhou
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My area's famous for not being able to pronounce t's in the middle of words. Thus, I often say co'on (cotton), moun'ain (mountain), bu'er (butter), congrajulations (congratulations), Sa'urday (Saturday).
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:23 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Seriously? Have you ever BEEN to New Jersey



Quatta or quatta pounder - Quarter, quarter pounder
CaraBEann - CaribbEAn
sheesh - ?????
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Yeah what we do with ts is we sort of swallow them, as in we put the tongue up to the roof of the mouth but then we don't roll it back down quickly so its not a distinct tut sound but more of a tah sound, so to sounds more let ta.
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PGViking View Post
My area's famous for not being able to pronounce t's in the middle of words. Thus, I often say co'on (cotton), moun'ain (mountain), bu'er (butter), congrajulations (congratulations), Sa'urday (Saturday).
So Utahns have a similar micro-accent to what us Coloradans have! Although for us it's not taken quite as far as to pronounce butter like bu'er, although I do say "budder."

For us, it's mainly leaving the T's out of words that have specific consonants before the T, like the word mountain; we say "moun'n."

If I were to pronounce the name of Scranton, I'd say Scran'n. The name Martin? Mar'n.

Although when it comes to having a vowel before the T, it seems like we kind of pronounce the T, but then go straight to the apostrophe N... Like the word cotton, I pronounce "cot'n".

Kinda confusing, but I'm sure you and others from the mountain west know EXACTLY what I'm talking about!
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:40 PM
 
Location: You Ta Zhou
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
So Utahns have a similar micro-accent to what us Coloradans have! Although for us it's not taken quite as far as to pronounce butter like bu'er, although I do say "budder."

For us, it's mainly leaving the T's out of words that have specific consonants before the T, like the word mountain; we say "moun'n."

If I were to pronounce the name of Scranton, I'd say Scran'n. The name Martin? Mar'n.

Although when it comes to having a vowel before the T, it seems like we kind of pronounce the T, but then go straight to the apostrophe N... Like the word cotton, I pronounce "cot'n".

Kinda confusing, but I'm sure you and others from the mountain west know EXACTLY what I'm talking about!
I pronounce butter "budder" when I'm saying it slowly. I think Utahns have the accent stronger than you do in Colorado, but it seems pretty similar. It's probably more accurate to say that for most of my examples, the pronunciation can range from a 'd' to being completely unpronounced.

Some of my examples were a bit exaggerated, but I can say that I don't ever pronounce the t in 'cotton'. I don't know what it is, but that word just sounds wrong with a 't' in it!
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
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It sounds like you guys have it stronger. It is a strange little accent, that's for sure!
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Philly suburbs or Jersey Shore or Philadelphia
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The whole dropping the T's thing is not really that unique to your area at all. People from a lot of places say Scran'in, budder, and congrajulations.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: You Ta Zhou
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Originally Posted by AdamBpa View Post
The whole dropping the T's thing is not really that unique to your area at all. People from a lot of places say Scran'in, budder, and congrajulations.
When you don't have anything else to make your accent distinct, you take pride in the small differences. I'm not saying the Rocky Mountains are the only place where this happens, but it's something that distinguishes us from some of the other states with bland accents.
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Old 05-24-2011, 12:16 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Americans in general replace the "tt" in the middle of words with a "dd" sound. Think "butter", "matter", "shutter", "better", etc. Heck, even many single "t" words get the "d" treatment in America: "litre", "water", "gator", etc...
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