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Old 08-25-2007, 11:19 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,604,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
I find it interesting that this map shows Charleston SC as an 'outlier' where the dialect is not spoken.
Well, I've been to Charleston and can say without bias that the map is wrong where that is concerned. Charleston, SC has a true Southern accent, more specifically a Piedmont accent, which is a very rich Southern accent. While each Southern state may have a different accent, all have enough commonalities with one another to be linked and grouped into one definitive region.
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Old 08-25-2007, 11:24 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Haha, the poster was probably referring to more common nickname that many Eastern and Western Pennsylvanians use to disparage Central PA -- "Pennsyltucky." With the exception of State College, the central part of our state really is a totally different world than what you'd find around Philadelphia or Pittsburgh.
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh themselves actually are totally different worlds from one another. Pittsburgh to me came across as more Midwestern/Appalachian, while Philadelphia came across to me as Northeastern. Pennsylvania, being a state touching the Mason-Dixon line, is not the homogenous mixture everybody wants to claim it is.
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Old 08-25-2007, 11:38 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
In no way in my mind could Gettysburg/ Southern PA be Southern- except maybe less Northern than further North. I consider it "Mid-Atlantic"

Maryland on the other hand, I simply cannot accept as a truly northern state, nor a truly Southern state. Its not Northern, because I know people from Southern Maryland who grew up on Tobacco farms, and their deameanor and attitudes are very Southern (not country) but Southern. Baltimore is a Northern city, with a southern influence. Perhaps Maryland is a mix between Northern and Southern

But no matter what people say- Virginia is distinctly Southern. And thats all I'm gonna say aboot that. I am a Southerner, dang it !
I'd have to agree with you there, vasinger. The map of Southern American English shows the Southern dialect to be dominant in 70-80% of Virginia. I think Virginia has always been and always will be a Southern state. Northern Virginia I would say is an outlier to the rest of Virginia like the Missouri bootheel is to the rest of Missouri. I actually think that in some ways Pennsylvania fits in better as a Mid-Atlantic state than it does a northeastern one. Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware I think belong in a category together as Mid-Atlantic. I think D.C. should also be classified as Mid-Atlantic.
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Old 08-25-2007, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 7,965,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I'd have to agree with you there, vasinger. The map of Southern American English shows the Southern dialect to be dominant in 70-80% of Virginia. I think Virginia has always been and always will be a Southern state. Northern Virginia I would say is an outlier to the rest of Virginia like the Missouri bootheel is to the rest of Missouri. I actually think that in some ways Pennsylvania fits in better as a Mid-Atlantic state than it does a northeastern one. Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware I think belong in a category together as Mid-Atlantic. I think D.C. should also be classified as Mid-Atlantic.
Not to mention the climate kind of changes at Fredericksburg. I would say Northern Virginia is now Mid-Atlantic too. South of Fredericksburg and you enter the Southeast.
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Old 08-25-2007, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL; Upstate NY native
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My daughter is attending West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV, which is less than 10 miles from the Mason-Dixon line. Some of friends from Pittsburgh note that there are some differences once you hit WV. Not bad differences, just differences in the way people talk mostly. The friends from WV also note that there is a difference once you are out of WV and into PA. I don't know, maybe it's psychological and people think it changes because of the M-D line. I think people are pretty much the same everywhere.
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