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Old 08-23-2007, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,126,805 times
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This article should really put to rest where the North-South begins.

The Mason Dixon line truly is the line between North and South.

A Fine Line - washingtonpost.com

A Fine Line
Between Gettysburg, Pa., And Emmitsburg, Md., Mason and Dixon Still Draw Subtle Distinctions

By Linton Weeks
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, February 14, 2007; C02

A few years ago, Brad Edmondson and I decided to found the Institute for Northern Studies.
Moderator cut: copyrights

Last edited by Yac; 12-10-2007 at 01:55 AM..
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Old 08-23-2007, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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That was a nice article! Thank you!
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Old 08-23-2007, 08:07 AM
 
Location: South Central PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
In Gettysburg, she said, folks keep to themselves.
Yep.

Sorry, being from gettysburg, I still consider it northern and maryland too. It's got a Pennsylbama feel to it, being it's got one of the largest concentrations of skinheads in the north, but it just feels northern.
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Old 08-23-2007, 03:07 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marodi View Post
Yep.

Sorry, being from gettysburg, I still consider it northern and maryland too. It's got a Pennsylbama feel to it, being it's got one of the largest concentrations of skinheads in the north, but it just feels northern.
This is what I consider to be the Mason-Dixon line...the map of the boundaries of Southern dialect shown here, except I would include all of Florida. With Texas and Oklahoma, I'd just get rid of the Mason-Dixon line because they fit in with more than two regions (Great Plains, Southwest, South) U.S. Highway 60 I've always thought is a very good approximator of the Mason-Dixon line. In fact, I might even go so far as to say that U.S. 60 should be established as the true Mason-Dixon line...for the most part it is a very accurate divider...the most it is ever off is in just one state, Virginia, by less than 100 miles...other than that it appears that the Southern dialect boundaries roughly parallel U.S. 60 all the way from West Virginia to Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.

Image:Southern American English.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-23-2007, 03:11 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,910,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marodi View Post
Yep.

Sorry, being from gettysburg, I still consider it northern and maryland too. It's got a Pennsylbama feel to it, being it's got one of the largest concentrations of skinheads in the north, but it just feels northern.
lol Pennsylbama? So it's northern and southern hahahaha....it's ironic that you say Pennsylbama because Birmingham and Pittsburgh kinda complete that term...states are rich in steel...anyway...I'm sure you meant Pennsylvania...lol Pennsylbama
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Old 08-23-2007, 03:25 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,337,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
This is what I consider to be the Mason-Dixon line...the map of the boundaries of Southern dialect shown here, except I would include all of Florida. With Texas and Oklahoma, I'd just get rid of the Mason-Dixon line because they fit in with more than two regions (Great Plains, Southwest, South) U.S. Highway 60 I've always thought is a very good approximator of the Mason-Dixon line. In fact, I might even go so far as to say that U.S. 60 should be established as the true Mason-Dixon line...for the most part it is a very accurate divider...the most it is ever off is in just one state, Virginia, by less than 100 miles...other than that it appears that the Southern dialect boundaries roughly parallel U.S. 60 all the way from West Virginia to Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.

Image:Southern American English.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I find it interesting that this map shows Charleston SC as an 'outlier' where the dialect is not spoken.
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Old 08-23-2007, 03:52 PM
 
Location: moving again
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the author says he ate at a resturant that felt southern in emitsburg. Wow. That truley doesn't mean a place is southern if there is a southern style resturant.

It truley is not an entirely different world on the other side if you go into a fireworks store. both sides feel exactly the same anyway
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Old 08-23-2007, 06:03 PM
 
Location: South Central PA
1,562 posts, read 3,906,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
lol Pennsylbama? So it's northern and southern hahahaha....it's ironic that you say Pennsylbama because Birmingham and Pittsburgh kinda complete that term...states are rich in steel...anyway...I'm sure you meant Pennsylvania...lol Pennsylbama
Actually I meant it. It's also been called pennsyltucky. It's generally the region that isn't pittsburgh or philly. More conservatives than liberals, and other diffrences.
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Old 08-23-2007, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,126,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
This is what I consider to be the Mason-Dixon line...the map of the boundaries of Southern dialect shown here, except I would include all of Florida. With Texas and Oklahoma, I'd just get rid of the Mason-Dixon line because they fit in with more than two regions (Great Plains, Southwest, South) U.S. Highway 60 I've always thought is a very good approximator of the Mason-Dixon line. In fact, I might even go so far as to say that U.S. 60 should be established as the true Mason-Dixon line...for the most part it is a very accurate divider...the most it is ever off is in just one state, Virginia, by less than 100 miles...other than that it appears that the Southern dialect boundaries roughly parallel U.S. 60 all the way from West Virginia to Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.

Image:Southern American English.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That may apply now, but 50 years ago the line was another 60 miles north. Northern Virginians were very Southern- as much as North Carolina at one time. These two guys I knew from Fairfax county had very strong Virginia accents and they were natives to the region. But today, of course, Northern Virginia is much too transient to be a part of the South or any region for that matter.
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Old 08-23-2007, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,126,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marodi View Post
Yep.

Sorry, being from gettysburg, I still consider it northern and maryland too. It's got a Pennsylbama feel to it, being it's got one of the largest concentrations of skinheads in the north, but it just feels northern.
In no way in my mind could Gettysburg/ Southern PA be Southern- except maybe less Northern than further North. I consider it "Mid-Atlantic"

Maryland on the other hand, I simply cannot accept as a truly northern state, nor a truly Southern state. Its not Northern, because I know people from Southern Maryland who grew up on Tobacco farms, and their deameanor and attitudes are very Southern (not country) but Southern. Baltimore is a Northern city, with a southern influence. Perhaps Maryland is a mix between Northern and Southern

But no matter what people say- Virginia is distinctly Southern. And thats all I'm gonna say aboot that. I am a Southerner, dang it !
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