U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-04-2011, 10:13 AM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
I agree, too. I lived in Syracuse for a year, at a time when they averaged 110 inches of snowfall per winter. The schools never closed that winter.

I visited Knoxville, Tennessee for part of the same winter I lived in Syracuse. Knoxville had no equipment for removing snow from the roads. A 7-inch snowfall caused the schools to close for a week and many businesses closed for a day or two.
Great point, considering both have great Fall seasons. So, that can help the OP make the proper decision.

Also, I believe that the OP's spouse is originally from Michigan and she could be closer to family if Upstate NY is an option.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-04-2011, 11:33 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,148,649 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor Cal Doc View Post
What is a "manageable" amount of snow? Either annually, monthly, weekly, daily, hourly... whatever helps us understand better. We want snow, but not so much that it traps us inside completely for 3-4 straight months.
Manageable amount of snow totally depends on the area you are in. The Northern Tier states are equipped to deal with snow, so what they consider manageable would be an unthinkable amount to fringe states that are not set-up to handle snow. I would rather have a 24" snowfall in Northern Maine, Upstate New York, Northern Michigan, etc... than a 6" snowfall in North Carolina or Tenn.

Quote:
How much snowfall causes things to stop (schools, roads, etc.)?
See above. I have lived in the South where they called off schools, universities, and closed businesses for a forecast of snow. Let schools out early and close stores because there was snow in the air and not even sticking to the grass. I have also woke up to 30"+ of new snow in Northern Maine and not have the schools even delayed.

Around here it is the wind that will close schools before a set amount of snow. Wind driven snow can cause visibility to drop to zero on rural roads, so they close schools even though it may only be 4" of powder. A drop of 20"+ without wind doesn't affect anything.


Quote:
Will we need more than snow tires for our front-wheel drive cars? How much should we spend on snow tires or do we even need them? How much snow can we realistically drive in safely?
Snow tires will be just fine, but put them on all 4 corners of your vehicle. Again it all depends on the type of snow as to how much you can go through. 6" of wet, heavy slushy snow is far more difficult to get around in than 18" of light fluffy powder.


Quote:
What else (anything) do we need to consider in relationship to living in snowy areas?
boots/hats/jackets/gloves. Cold is harder to deal with than snow usually.

Quote:
Anybody have pictures/video to help our perspective?
These two photos were taken 12 days apart back in 2009 (the only two I have of the same area close to the same dates in the winter). They show that you really can't judge what kind of winter it will be by stats alone. Between the photos we received 16" of snow during one storm alone. One winter we can get 150" of snow, the next winter we may get 40" of snow; that averages out to our real "average" of 95" a year. you just never know how much.
#1) 48 degrees, Dec 2nd @ 10:13 AM
#2) 11 degrees, Dec 14th @ 12:16 PM
Attached Thumbnails
Manageable annual amount of snow???-dsc08246-large-.jpg   Manageable annual amount of snow???-dsc08428-large-.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 12:48 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,452 posts, read 14,303,163 times
Reputation: 23177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
See above. I have lived in the South where they called off schools, universities, and closed businesses for a forecast of snow. Let schools out early and close stores because there was snow in the air and not even sticking to the grass. I have also woke up to 30"+ of new snow in Northern Maine and not have the schools even delayed.
To add to that the size of the city also apparently makes a difference. I'm in one of those border states and the little city I'm in now closes schools at the merest hint of snow in the forecast, because a lot of students live in outlying rural, mountainous areas where there aren't city operated plows or salt trucks to clear the roads. Seems like they lose a day at least every week or two all winter long here.
Living in a much larger city in the same state I didn't see it happening nearly as often, usually only when there was actually snow, or more often, ice on the roads.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
Reputation: 7737
Along the coast in the Northeast corrider or Denver may be the largest cities that offer a more temperate winter with a few considerable snowfalls and without long periods of extreme cold.

Though the Noresters can shut things down for a good day or so. Anything close to or above 20 inches in one snowfall is pretty considerable
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 12:55 PM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,532,267 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Along the coast in the Northeast corrider or Denver may be the largest cities that offer a more temperate winter with a few considerable snowfalls and without long periods of extreme cold.

Though the Noresters can shut things down for a good day or so. Anything close to or above 20 inches in one snowfall is pretty considerable
Not in Boston, or Springfield, they get snow away right away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 02:06 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
Reputation: 7737
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Not in Boston, or Springfield, they get snow away right away.

24 inches? Last year I had to cancel trips to Cambridge twice because of these snowfalls, why becuase the office was closed and people couldnt (had issues) get/ting to work for a day or two. Even Philly can handle 10 inches pretty well, 2 feet in twelve hours is another story
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2011, 07:40 PM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,532,267 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
24 inches? Last year I had to cancel trips to Cambridge twice because of these snowfalls, why becuase the office was closed and people couldnt (had issues) get/ting to work for a day or two. Even Philly can handle 10 inches pretty well, 2 feet in twelve hours is another story
well usually offices don't close for anything short of a power outage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2014, 08:47 AM
 
158 posts, read 111,367 times
Reputation: 66
We had a 4-6 inches of snow here in Western Oregon a few weeks ago and up to a foot in the cities just south of Salem Oregon. Result? Everything was shut down for 3-4 days including major attractions.

BullWinkles Family Fun Center was closed for 4 days in a row and so were the Portland Zoo and OMSI.etc. Nobody was going nowhere. I laughed the whole time. I can see them all being closed the first day of snowfall and opening late the next day so that people can have a chance to get used to it but for 4 entire days?

I bet they all lost a lot of money over the weekend they were closed especially OMSI.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2014, 08:59 AM
 
32,060 posts, read 32,956,580 times
Reputation: 14944
NYC usually gets a manageable amount of snow and the city rarely stops because of snow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2014, 10:21 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
We're over 70" of snow for this winter, almost the all-time record, but still nothing has really stopped the city at all because of any snow. It's the record cold winter that tripped people up and caused problems with fussy commuter trains, frozen pipes and delayed school.

We're supposed to get up to another 10" of snow this weekend - but everyone's reaction is just to roll their eyes and go "of course we are....". A 10" snowstorm at this point would just be called "Tuesday".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top