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Old 11-02-2011, 06:33 PM
 
2 posts, read 95,802 times
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While looking to attend a top college or university I have noticed that some of the best areas and largest student population of the college network is concentrated on the north coasts of the United States.

We have Boston with the following schools:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard University
Boston College
Boston University
University of Mass. (Boston Campus)
Berklee College of Music
Newberry College
Brandeis University

In the San Francisco Bay Area:

University of California Berkley
San Francisco State
California College of the Arts
Stanford University
University of San Francisco
Academy of the Arts

So obviously there are a lot more art schools in the Bay area but more technological areas in the Boston region. So the questions still is: Is "the college network" in one area better than the other in terms of a broad sense for lifestyle and living. Also what other areas would you suggest and say have a great quality of life with educated graduates in the surrounding area?

 
Old 11-02-2011, 08:25 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,385,767 times
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Not quite sure what your question is but the Boston area has more of a collegiate feel overall. Depending on what you want, that isn't necessarily a good thing.
Also your assumption about art schools is a bit off. Both areas have strong tech and art...as well as most everything. The best art school in the country however is right around Boston, RISD.
 
Old 11-03-2011, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Terra
208 posts, read 422,937 times
Reputation: 350
It seems to me you're asking two different questions - which area has a more diverse college lifestyle, and which area (or other areas) has more educated graduates living in that area. The schools you have listed cover a wide range, from internationally-renowned universities to state/more local schools. The larger and more global the scale of the school, the more likely that its student/alumni population is diverse. However, they may not stay in the area of the school they graduated from and are more likely to move elsewhere. So...it's hard to answer your inquiry.

Boston and SF are two very different cities in and of themselves aside from their concentration of universities and thus have different diversities, if you will. To say that Boston is more "technological" isn't quite correct, given that SF is so close to Silicon Valley. I would suggest researching the geographic areas or cities you'd like to live in, rather than the conglomeration of schools that exist in those areas or cities.
 
Old 11-03-2011, 02:33 PM
 
6,843 posts, read 7,031,460 times
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Ever hear of Emerson or Tufts? top notch schools

no city in the world compares favorably to Boston in this field.
 
Old 11-07-2011, 03:02 PM
 
6,843 posts, read 7,031,460 times
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Why do you add schools in Sfs suburbs, bu only include schools from Boston Proper?
 
Old 11-08-2011, 02:46 AM
 
Location: In the heights
15,280 posts, read 17,517,205 times
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You're missing quite a few places from both metro areas, but especially Boston whose really good schools are overshadowed by the amazing schools. Both the Bay Area and Boston's metro have fantastic schools and that's undeniable, but it does seem like Boston pulls ahead overall though many Boston graduates end up migrating outwards to the Bay Area or New York City.

Speaking of which, New York City should also be in those ranks due to the sheer diversity of its great schools (with or without including Yale or Princeton into its ranks).
 
Old 11-08-2011, 04:35 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,385,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Ever hear of Emerson or Tufts? top notch schools

no city in the world compares favorably to Boston in this field.
Sure they can, just maybe not per capita.
London (Cambridge, ICL, UCL, KCL, LSE) , NYC (Columbia/Princeton/Yale/NYU)
 
Old 11-08-2011, 04:54 PM
 
Location: In the heights
15,280 posts, read 17,517,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Sure they can, just maybe not per capita.
London (Cambridge, ICL, UCL, KCL, LSE) , NYC (Columbia/Princeton/Yale/NYU)
I guess it's arguable that Cambridge is less a part of London and Princeton and Yale are less a part of New York City than the other schools that are mentioned.

I'd add that both London and NYC have a large number of smaller more specialized schools which are the top of their fields.

Definitely agreed though that overall Boston, London, and New York are tops in the world for education.
 
Old 11-08-2011, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,623 posts, read 11,064,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I guess it's arguable that Cambridge is less a part of London and Princeton and Yale are less a part of New York City than the other schools that are mentioned.

I'd add that both London and NYC have a large number of smaller more specialized schools which are the top of their fields.

Definitely agreed though that overall Boston, London, and New York are tops in the world for education.
I have a very tough time adding Cambridge in for London...it's 60 miles away from the city and--as far as I know--not part of the metro area.

I have similar feelings about both Yale and Princeton as being part of NYC. Princeton is definitely in its own world out in NJ (though whenever the argument comes up, Philly and NYC argue over who has claim), and New Haven doesn't feel like part of the NY area at all. I feel like colleges need to be in the inner-urban area of a city to actually be claimed by it.
 
Old 11-08-2011, 06:08 PM
 
6,843 posts, read 7,031,460 times
Reputation: 3638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Sure they can, just maybe not per capita.
London (Cambridge, ICL, UCL, KCL, LSE) , NYC (Columbia/Princeton/Yale/NYU)
BC, BU, Harvard, MIT, Northeastern, Tufts, ect.
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