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Old 11-05-2011, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Bayou City
2,991 posts, read 4,607,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
No suburban parish in the New Orleans metro went less than 63% for McCain.
The New Orleans suburbs immediately came to mind as well. Heck, David Duke saw overwhelming political support in places like Metairie and Mandeville just 20 yrs ago.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:58 AM
 
Location: classified
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I would include Salt Lake City as well. The city itself is pretty moderate and liberal but the suburbs are staunchly mormon and conservative.
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Old 11-05-2011, 06:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I seem to recall reading that Atlanta, oddly enough, has some very conservative suburbs.
True.

Forsyth and Cherokee Counties are listed as being among the top ten conservative counties in the nation, according to areas of significant population.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
I would include Salt Lake City as well. The city itself is pretty moderate and liberal but the suburbs are staunchly mormon and conservative.
Even in the suburbs, you'll find a great many non-Mormons, although Utahns, on the whole (LDS and non-LDS) tend to be pretty conservative.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:55 AM
 
2,729 posts, read 5,160,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
I would include Salt Lake City as well. The city itself is pretty moderate and liberal but the suburbs are staunchly mormon and conservative.
True, although SLC may seem liberal based on Utah standards. It is a smallish city completely surrounded by conservative suburbs, and these suburbs have more people than the actual city itself, and sure there may be some libs here and there but overall the entire SL Valley, even the actual boundaries of SLC are conservative. SLC is liberal compared to Provo for instance, but SLC liberalism is nothing like what you would experience in Portland or even Denver.
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Old 11-05-2011, 07:31 PM
 
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New York city's suburb had (Lakewood) (as far as I can tell) the most pro McCain ED (percentage wise) in the country 885-3-1 (McCain-Obama-other).
and I doubt there are to many other suburbs that had many 90% (in non rural EDs) McCain EDs like NY (most if not all of them were Orthodox (5 Towns, Ramapo, Lakewood, Kiryas Yoel))
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:29 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,991,559 times
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Thinking on some more possibles.

Minneapolis-St. Paul looks like it has some pretty conservative suburbs and Michele Bachman represents some suburbs of the Twin Cities.

Phoenix, Arizona's suburbs I think include some of the most conservative cities. Not that Phoenix itself is known for being unusually liberal, but I think places like Mesa are considered noticeably more conservative. I think some of the Phoenix suburbs are traditionally Mormon so might be pretty socially conservative as well.

Beaver County, Pennsylvania was one of the few counties outside the South or Southwest where Kerry won, but Obama lost. Some of it looks to be Pittsburgh suburbs. Not sure if that makes it socially conservative or not.

It seems like Austin, Texas has suburbs that are pretty conservative compared to the core-city. (Not that Austin is that liberal, but it does look to be more liberal than US average)
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:53 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,455,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
No suburban parish in the New Orleans metro went less than 63% for McCain.
Surprising considering how black they are.
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Old 11-06-2011, 12:50 AM
 
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Something I've noticed-the newer and faster-growing the suburb is, the more conservative Republican it is, generally speaking. The older and more established, the more moderate the suburb is.

A good example of this is the Twin Cities region in Minnesota. The older inner suburbs are very 50/50, the middle-ring suburbs are moderately Republican, and the newer outer suburbs and exurbs are strongly Republican.

I think this pattern has to do with the way suburbs develop. The younger, newer suburbs attract people who like to live far from the city, but not in the countryside per se...they want low taxes, a high rate of business growth, and they embrace conservative cultural values, being very protective of the families they raise.

Once a suburb becomes more established and slows down in its rate of growth, however, its population becomes more interested in education, access to health care, good infrastructure, etc. They moderate on the cultural issues, are more supportive of government spending, and become more urban and cosmopolitan in their overall outlook.
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Old 11-06-2011, 07:14 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,583,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenSJC View Post
Something I've noticed-the newer and faster-growing the suburb is, the more conservative Republican it is, generally speaking. The older and more established, the more moderate the suburb is.

A good example of this is the Twin Cities region in Minnesota. The older inner suburbs are very 50/50, the middle-ring suburbs are moderately Republican, and the newer outer suburbs and exurbs are strongly Republican.

I think this pattern has to do with the way suburbs develop. The younger, newer suburbs attract people who like to live far from the city, but not in the countryside per se...they want low taxes, a high rate of business growth, and they embrace conservative cultural values, being very protective of the families they raise.

Once a suburb becomes more established and slows down in its rate of growth, however, its population becomes more interested in education, access to health care, good infrastructure, etc. They moderate on the cultural issues, are more supportive of government spending, and become more urban and cosmopolitan in their overall outlook.

Well, for most of the country, it really boils down to race. Whites are more conservative, on average, and are far more likely to vote Republican. As the country becomes more non-white (whether you think that's a good thing or not), areas that are overwhelmingly white are becoming the norm only in the outer (newer) suburban areas. The older suburban areas are more non-white, and the inner cities are the most non-white of all. Non-white, on average, tend to vote more for Democrats. Thus, that's the case in most areas of the country. Exceptions might include places where the whites tend to be more liberal than whites in most places in the country. Examples include parts of the west coast, parts of the front range of Colorado, New England, other parts of the northeast, Minnesota, parts of Wisconsin and Illinois. Outside of these areas, most whites are overwhelmingly conservative.
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