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View Poll Results: Which states are southeastern? (Multi-choice option)
Alabama 67 75.28%
Arkansas 28 31.46%
Florida 76 85.39%
Georgia 86 96.63%
Kentucky 27 30.34%
Louisiana 42 47.19%
Maryland 10 11.24%
Mississippi 58 65.17%
North Carolina 79 88.76%
Oklahoma 3 3.37%
South Carolina 85 95.51%
Tennessee 59 66.29%
Texas 7 7.87%
Virginia 61 68.54%
West Virginia 19 21.35%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 89. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-12-2011, 10:43 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
The Great Plains are not all Midwestern. Texas and Oklahoma are overall culturally Southern states...even in the far western areas you can still hear Southern accents. There is absolutely nothing Midwestern about Texas.
Exactly!

It can be argued, of course, that parts of the far northern panhandle of Texas share some strong commonalities with the plains Midwest...and certainly that trans-pecos Texas is interior SW...but that the state itself, as a whole, is a "mish-mash" of cultures that make it nothing in particular? As in a melting pot like California? That notion is just ludicrous and, to most native Texans, even insulting....

Anyway, with all due respect to Arias? The person is either fooling themselves or just doesn't know what they are talking about. Regardless, I am not trying to talk around you, Arias, and I mean this reply in the spirit of good will and conversation....

Texas is essentially a Southern state. It entered the Union as one, it seceded as one, it rejoined as one, and its whole history and culture has been Southern in origin and essence. If the fact that even West Texas is one of the strongest bastions of the Southern Baptist Church and an undiluted "Southern American accent" is not evidence, then I don't know what could be. PLUS the fact that the states west of Texas and north of Oklahomoa are so very different in just about every way possible...

THIS is the "west" Texas was part of. The same one Kansas was part of. And North Dakota. But they share little in common even with one another... much less the true West of Wyoming and Utah.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frontier_Strip

Is Texas a typical Southern state? No, it isn't...but then again, I don't know what IS a typical Southern state. Does anyone? All I know is that there is a part of the south central and southeastern part of the country that share a common history and culture that make it different from the rest of the country...even from the first time we open our mouths and say, "hey, y'all want a coke...?" A certain something that makes up what is called "The South." And perhaps more importantly, is that there is that definite part of the country where most natives consider themselves to live in the South and consider themselves Southerners.

Texas is part of that. There is no mistaking the average native Texan, when s/he is out of the South, as being taken as anything but a Southerner.... And for sure that most identify as such. Want to argue about it?

But anyway, I will be fair, Arias, and let you provide your evidence different...

Last edited by TexasReb; 11-12-2011 at 11:21 PM..
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Old 11-13-2011, 01:24 AM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,122,606 times
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How does Texas manage to take center stage in a discussion over what states are in the Southeast? There is no question that Texas is not a Southeastern state. No, not even East Texas is in the Southeast. East Texas is unmistakably Southern, but that's it. The remainder of Texas is not classifiable into a broader region (Brownsville, Austin, Midland, Abilene) or is Southwestern (El Paso, Pecos, San Antonio, Laredo), if anything.

The idea that Virginia is not a Southeastern state is extremely silly. What criteria are people using for the question where they choose to exclude Virginia from the Southeastern category? Many Virginians have Southern accents, the religious profile of Virginians is in tune with that of other Southeastern states, the rural black population of Virginia is reminiscent of other Southeastern states, the topography/geography/vegetation is like that of other states in the South, the state is conservative (except for Northern Virginia), the climate is very similar to other states in the Southeast, etc.

When you combine the history, coupled with the name of some schools/major streets (Jeff Davis Highway, Rebel Run, Stonewall Jackson High School), in with the factors I listed above, it is comical that anyone would place Virginia anywhere else but in the Southeast.
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Old 11-13-2011, 06:19 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,580,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
How does Texas manage to take center stage in a discussion over what states are in the Southeast? There is no question that Texas is not a Southeastern state. No, not even East Texas is in the Southeast. East Texas is unmistakably Southern, but that's it. The remainder of Texas is not classifiable into a broader region (Brownsville, Austin, Midland, Abilene) or is Southwestern (El Paso, Pecos, San Antonio, Laredo), if anything.
Abilene is a very southern area. People speak with a very obvious southern accent in that area. You can hear the same even in Midland and Odessa, as well as Lubbock. I've heard people speaking with a southern accent in far southeastern New Mexico. On the other hand, the southern accent kind of dies out west of Odessa in Texas. Places like Pecos or El Paso do not have the identifiable southern accent.

Quote:
The idea that Virginia is not a Southeastern state is extremely silly. What criteria are people using for the question where they choose to exclude Virginia from the Southeastern category? Many Virginians have Southern accents, the religious profile of Virginians is in tune with that of other Southeastern states, the rural black population of Virginia is reminiscent of other Southeastern states, the topography/geography/vegetation is like that of other states in the South, the state is conservative (except for Northern Virginia), the climate is very similar to other states in the Southeast, etc.

When you combine the history, coupled with the name of some schools/major streets (Jeff Davis Highway, Rebel Run, Stonewall Jackson High School), in with the factors I listed above, it is comical that anyone would place Virginia anywhere else but in the Southeast.
People probably exclude Virginia because the see it as being a bit too far north. If anyone argued whether Virginia was more northeastern or southeaster, geographically speaking, of course people would say southeastern. That said, it's kind on the center of the Atlantic Coast. It's part of the South, as it's culturally southern, but some people don't view it geographically as part of the southeast.
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Old 11-13-2011, 09:30 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,909,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post

People probably exclude Virginia because the see it as being a bit too far north. If anyone argued whether Virginia was more northeastern or southeaster, geographically speaking, of course people would say southeastern. That said, it's kind on the center of the Atlantic Coast. It's part of the South, as it's culturally southern, but some people don't view it geographically as part of the southeast.
You are right but regardless Virginia should have more votes.

Virginia is in the South. And Virginia is in the East. Any further east and in your in the ocean.

South + East = Southeast.
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Old 11-13-2011, 11:29 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,117,165 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
How does Texas manage to take center stage in a discussion over what states are in the Southeast? There is no question that Texas is not a Southeastern state. No, not even East Texas is in the Southeast. East Texas is unmistakably Southern, but that's it. The remainder of Texas is not classifiable into a broader region (Brownsville, Austin, Midland, Abilene) or is Southwestern (El Paso, Pecos, San Antonio, Laredo), if anything.
Sorry Miamiman, I gotta dispute you here!.

Of course you are right that Texas as a whole is not a southeastern state...who argues with that? However, if taken seperately, then part of it (far East Texas) is not only geographically in the southeast quadrant, but -- historically and culturally -- the western extention of the classic "Deep South".

The other anamolies, so to speak, are in the far western part of the state(trans-pecos) which can fairly be considered truly "desert/interior" Southwest. And there is a part of the upper panhandle that might fairly fit more into the Plains Midwest than the South. And today -- I might agree -- it is also fair to think of parts of far south Texas as being something different. But even here, ALL all the above have a certain Southern heritage that is not true of neighboring states to the north (above Oklahoma) or west.

The rest of Texas? Well, it is TEXAS, of course...but the point I think (with all due respect) you and some others miss is that this much larger part of the state is essentially a product of the American South.

What is often called "typically Texas", is really -- in essence -- just the southeast moved into a more "western" or "frontier" environment. While it isn't the classic "Old South" (obviously) it is just a unique sub-region of it. The (once again) "Western South." This is a whole different "Southwest" than of New Mexico and Arizona.

Let me also take up -- to back my own position -- your own statement about how you agree East Texas is "unmistakeably Southern." Of course I agree with that. BUT? You seem, by your comments about the rest of the state being classified elsewhere (as all states will be), does it make any sense that one just suddenly goes -- at some imaginiary dividing line like I-35 E -- from the unmistakeable South into a whole different region more affiliated with certain other states also classified as West or Southwest?

This makes no sense...and it certainly does not square with important considerations of settlement, accents, politics, church membership, etc. Nor even self-identification with a region, which might be the most important aspect of all. Even most west Texans consider themselves to live in the South and think of themselves as Southerners...

To come back the full circle, Texas is TEXAS, we all know that. But when placed in a region (again, which all states are) it is Southern in its basics. This is in stark contrast to "Southwest" states which did not even become states until into the 20th century and, thus, could not possibly have really influenced the general history and attitudes and culture and all -- in Texas --in a way that southeastern pioneers did.

To elaborate, the dominating influence on Texas were those southeasterners who came west after the "war" and made their mark. It might not be politically correct to say it, but Mexican and Native-American influence was never the central focal influence on Texas. Instead, it was a "Southern" black/white duality that, while not always pleasant, was nonetheless the one that gave statehood Texas its roots and primary color (no pun intended! LOL) and character.

Are things changing a bit? Yeah, I would agree they are to some extent. I guess the best way to sum it up is in the words of Randolph Cambell in his book Gone to Texas (paraphrased):

The basic story of Texas...the key to Texas...(in the past) and in many respects ever since...lies in its development as an essentially Southern state, a part of the South.

Last edited by TexasReb; 11-13-2011 at 12:47 PM..
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Old 11-13-2011, 01:08 PM
 
62 posts, read 121,378 times
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Old 11-13-2011, 02:54 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,136,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Boiled peanuts aren't very well known here either
No shrimp and grits
Don't you live in Louisiana? Shrimp and grits is very common, although it isn't the same that you'd get in Georgia or somewhere. At least in the southeastern part of the south.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
To the 17 or so who pegged Louisiana as southeast, have you not looked at a globe or atlas to see where it is located? Do you also consider Minnesota in the northeast? These two states are the same longitude west for the most part. Culture smulture.

Culture wise everything west of the Pearl river and east of the Atchafalaya/Red river and north of I-10 bare similiraties.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
And just where in Texas were you that this "cowboy culture" was so prevalent? After living here for years and years, I rarely ever see someone even dressed as a cowboy, or anything that's related to that culture, except around Rodeo time. And no one here says "howdy".
I have to say that I saw more cowboy hats and boots in Dallas and Houston than I've seen anywhere else except maybe Mississippi. Another thing, I've even been in the airport 2 or 3 times and noticed that a few people got off planes from Texas with cowboy hats on. Me and a friend actually got a good laugh out of that as it reminded us of the Air Texas plane from the movie "Airplane".

Last edited by WestbankNOLA; 11-13-2011 at 03:06 PM..
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Old 11-13-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,688,146 times
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[quote=WestbankNOLA;21698485]Don't you live in Louisiana? Shrimp and grits is very common, although it isn't the same that you'd get in Georgia or somewhere. At least in the southeastern part of the south.

No I've never had any and I never hear them mentioned. Same for boiled peanuts. Now we are talking about the NW La.


Culture wise everything west of the Pearl river and east of the Atchafalaya/Red river and north of I-10 bare similiraties.

Undoubtedly there is a common bond there.
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Old 11-14-2011, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,229,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
I have a lot of different opinions of where New Orleans fits in.

On the one hand, I heard it described as "one of the great Southern cities" once. Didn't like that. I, like a lot of locals, still like to think of New Orleans as the most European city in America, the most unique city in America, the city that care forgot, the Paris of the New World.

As far as Texas, you have to admit that the Cowboy Culture, "Howdy", etc. all would strike a first-timer as western traits. The longer I stayed there though the more I realized that the foundations of the culture really are Southern. It's kind of a weird mix.

The state of Louisiana, however, belongs in the Southeast. From Lake Charles, up to Monroe, and down to New Orleans. Just look at people like Huey Long and our current governor. They're all bible-thumping true believers at heart, but we would never elect somebody as disingenuous as Rick Perry.
New Orleans is not exactly what i'd call SIMPLY bible-thumping. Southeastern Louisiana is heavily Catholic, so you have a lot of that to go with the bible-thumping.
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Old 11-15-2011, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
The Great Plains are not all Midwestern. Texas and Oklahoma are overall culturally Southern states...even in the far western areas you can still hear Southern accents. There is absolutely nothing Midwestern about Texas.
I would say the far North Panhandle of Texas, it is. But that's about it. However, are there some Midwestern characteristics in North Texas and Oklahoma? I would say yes. Does that make them Midwestern, no.
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