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Old 04-29-2016, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,226,512 times
Reputation: 846

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
Wow, You call NYC the lower northeast? To me that's specifically reserved for Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
I disagree. It's a term meant for Maryland and Delaware as well.
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Old 04-29-2016, 01:38 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 695,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
I disagree. It's a term meant for Maryland and Delaware as well.
OK...
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Old 04-29-2016, 01:41 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 695,578 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
You do realize that New York City is right across the river from New Jersey? Also there's no such thing as the lower and upper northeast, at least I've never heard of that after 18 years in New York/Jersey.

New England + Mid-Atlantic = Northeast

New England = Maine, Massachusetts. New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont

Mid-Atlantic = New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware (maybe Maryland too)
Yes, I do. I should have said places "in" PA and NJ; I don't think Newark is lower northeast and that NYC isn't. Generally what comes to mind is the Philadelphia area and other places in the middle/southern parts of PA and NJ, probably Wilmington, too.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,154,995 times
Reputation: 5637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
You do realize that New York City is right across the river from New Jersey? Also there's no such thing as the lower and upper northeast, at least I've never heard of that after 18 years in New York/Jersey.

New England + Mid-Atlantic = Northeast

New England = Maine, Massachusetts. New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont

Mid-Atlantic = New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware (maybe Maryland too)
Agree with this.
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Old 04-30-2016, 01:45 AM
 
972 posts, read 738,245 times
Reputation: 1044
New England + Mid-Atlantic = Northeast

New England = Maine, Massachusetts. New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont

Mid-Atlantic = New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware (maybe Maryland too)

Okay, so let's say these are the definitions! I have a question for you guys! I have never been to the north east but I really want to visit! I actually sorta want to move there eventually! But anyways how interconnected is the Northeast region? And is true it's like super dense? Like I've heard all the way from Boston to like D.C. Is all urban? Is this true? And what is the environment of the Northeast? Or is too big of a region to have just a few environments? Is the northeast super liberal too like Seattle, more or less liberal overall? Your replied will be GRATEFULLY appreciated! Thanks in advance!
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Old 04-30-2016, 05:16 AM
 
1,112 posts, read 695,578 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seattle4321 View Post
New England + Mid-Atlantic = Northeast

New England = Maine, Massachusetts. New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont

Mid-Atlantic = New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware (maybe Maryland too)

Okay, so let's say these are the definitions! I have a question for you guys! I have never been to the north east but I really want to visit! I actually sorta want to move there eventually! But anyways how interconnected is the Northeast region? And is true it's like super dense? Like I've heard all the way from Boston to like D.C. Is all urban? Is this true? And what is the environment of the Northeast? Or is too big of a region to have just a few environments? Is the northeast super liberal too like Seattle, more or less liberal overall? Your replied will be GRATEFULLY appreciated! Thanks in advance!
Perhaps you should start a thread on this...

Voters in the lower northeast tend to be more liberal in the metropolitan areas; rural Pennsylvania is very republican. In New England, there are states where every county has gone blue in an election, though. Some northeastern cities along I-95 may seem dense to you because they have a lot of rowhouses, and in Philadelphia specifically, the lots that those houses are on can get to be pretty small.

Between Boston and Washington, DC it is not all urban, but going between those cities, you may never see the transition from suburban to rural. Exceptions would be in northeast Maryland between Philly and Baltimore, and a stretch of land in Connecticut. Despite this, you won't feel like you are in one big city because the major cities are still hours away from each other.


The connection between the (coastal) cities in the northeast is infrastructural: through rail, telephone communication and things of that nature. Each city has its own distinctive architecture, culture, dialect, ambiance etc--there's not enough cultural diffusion between them to make them all seem the same in these aspects. The climate also varies; Boston is definitely colder than Philadelphia.

The cities of the inland northeast aren't as connected as the ones near the coast to each other. These cities tend to be less dense, colder, and are in areas that have more conservatives. The inland cities are "rust belt" and also have their own distinct cultures, which some say make are more Midwestern than they are Northeastern.
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Old 04-30-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
562 posts, read 539,552 times
Reputation: 1061
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
Perhaps you should start a thread on this...

Voters in the lower northeast tend to be more liberal in the metropolitan areas; rural Pennsylvania is very republican. In New England, there are states where every county has gone blue in an election, though. Some northeastern cities along I-95 may seem dense to you because they have a lot of rowhouses, and in Philadelphia specifically, the lots that those houses are on can get to be pretty small.

Between Boston and Washington, DC it is not all urban, but going between those cities, you may never see the transition from suburban to rural. Exceptions would be in northeast Maryland between Philly and Baltimore, and a stretch of land in Connecticut. Despite this, you won't feel like you are in one big city because the major cities are still hours away from each other.


The connection between the (coastal) cities in the northeast is infrastructural: through rail, telephone communication and things of that nature. Each city has its own distinctive architecture, culture, dialect, ambiance etc--there's not enough cultural diffusion between them to make them all seem the same in these aspects. The climate also varies; Boston is definitely colder than Philadelphia.

The cities of the inland northeast aren't as connected as the ones near the coast to each other. These cities tend to be less dense, colder, and are in areas that have more conservatives. The inland cities are "rust belt" and also have their own distinct cultures, which some say make are more Midwestern than they are Northeastern.
Fantastic description!
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Old 05-01-2016, 02:12 AM
 
972 posts, read 738,245 times
Reputation: 1044
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
Perhaps you should start a thread on this...

Voters in the lower northeast tend to be more liberal in the metropolitan areas; rural Pennsylvania is very republican. In New England, there are states where every county has gone blue in an election, though. Some northeastern cities along I-95 may seem dense to you because they have a lot of rowhouses, and in Philadelphia specifically, the lots that those houses are on can get to be pretty small.

Between Boston and Washington, DC it is not all urban, but going between those cities, you may never see the transition from suburban to rural. Exceptions would be in northeast Maryland between Philly and Baltimore, and a stretch of land in Connecticut. Despite this, you won't feel like you are in one big city because the major cities are still hours away from each other.


The connection between the (coastal) cities in the northeast is infrastructural: through rail, telephone communication and things of that nature. Each city has its own distinctive architecture, culture, dialect, ambiance etc--there's not enough cultural diffusion between them to make them all seem the same in these aspects. The climate also varies; Boston is definitely colder than Philadelphia.

The cities of the inland northeast aren't as connected as the ones near the coast to each other. These cities tend to be less dense, colder, and are in areas that have more conservatives. The inland cities are "rust belt" and also have their own distinct cultures, which some say make are more Midwestern than they are Northeastern.
Yes thank you! Once you said that I should start a thread on this I thought yeah I probably should, after reading your post I'm not sure I will. Your post really answered all my questions in a great way! Thanks for taking the time to do so! It's appreciated!
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Old 05-01-2016, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,211 posts, read 2,828,597 times
Reputation: 4497
What the hell is "Lower Northeast"? Lived Upstate NY and never heard this term; been all through Maryland and PA and never heard it either...

Hint: it doesn't really exist...
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Old 05-01-2016, 08:27 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,134 posts, read 9,905,553 times
Reputation: 6423
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
What the hell is "Lower Northeast"? Lived Upstate NY and never heard this term; been all through Maryland and PA and never heard it either...

Hint: it doesn't really exist...
I do not think I ever heard the term "Lower Northeast" in real life either. However, here on City-Data we have some geographical junkies that make things up to better describe different areas. I have even seen the term "Deep North" here on City-Data!
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