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Old 05-07-2016, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,574,904 times
Reputation: 27672

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NoVA/DC to NYC, although I think you could make an argument for all of eastern Virginia to be "up nawth" these days.
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Old 05-07-2016, 05:08 PM
 
2 posts, read 508 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
I really don't see how you can say Boston and Philadelphia aren't similar. Boston just happens to have stayed much closer to its Colonial self than Philadelphia has but the fact is that Boston and Philadelphia are very much alike in a few ways.
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
First of all, they weren't settled differently. Secondly, what exactly does it matter that according to some "expert" they don't talk the same? I really don't think you know much about Philadelphia if you think the entire city thinks a certain way or has certain views. You can find it however you like but that's the truth. Boston has a lot more of Old City to it than Philadelphia does.
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
You might not have said it outright but you sure implied it. I think you're confusing Plymouth with Boston. Either way, the point was that Boston has more of its colonial self intact within the city than Philadelphia does. Philadelphia became a lot more urban and industrial in many places and that in large part defines the city. Boston has that too, of course, but it's not what defines the city.

It appears you have it backwards.

Philadelphia has much more of it's colonial self left than Boston does.

Boston tore down a lot of it's colonial past when it deindustrialized.

Society Hill in Philadelphia is the largest collection of colonial architecture in the nation.
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Old 05-07-2016, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,227,304 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
NoVA/DC to NYC, although I think you could make an argument for all of eastern Virginia to be "up nawth" these days.
No you couldn't. Richmond, Hampton Roads, and Norfolk are solidly Southern cities.
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Old 05-07-2016, 05:19 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,189 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
I really don't see how you can say Boston and Philadelphia aren't similar. Boston just happens to have stayed much closer to its Colonial self than Philadelphia has but the fact is that Boston and Philadelphia are very much alike in a few ways.
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
First of all, they weren't settled differently. Secondly, what exactly does it matter that according to some "expert" they don't talk the same? I really don't think you know much about Philadelphia if you think the entire city thinks a certain way or has certain views. You can find it however you like but that's the truth. Boston has a lot more of Old City to it than Philadelphia does.
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
You might not have said it outright but you sure implied it. I think you're confusing Plymouth with Boston. Either way, the point was that Boston has more of its colonial self intact within the city than Philadelphia does. Philadelphia became a lot more urban and industrial in many places and that in large part defines the city. Boston has that too, of course, but it's not what defines the city.
False.

Philadelphia has stayed closer to it's colonial self.

Boston tore down most of it's colonial architecture. Philadelphia didn't.

Society Hill, Philadelphia is also the largest collection of 18th century colonial architecture in the country.

Simply put, the colonial feel is much more prominent in Philadelphia than Boston, although they both have it.
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Old 05-07-2016, 06:15 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 696,020 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
In terms of Maryland? Midland is the majority accent in the state by at least 60%. Only Southern Maryland speaks the fully Southern accent. With Virginia, roughly 80% of the state speaks the fully Southern dialect.
I back myself up with universities. Labov's is about 50% (of course it isn't super precise) though, like Tezcatlipoca said there is "undersampling" in Maryland: they don't have a lot of samples in isogloss areas and therefore can't tell where the Baltimore accent ends.
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Old 05-07-2016, 06:50 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 10 days ago)
 
1,224 posts, read 581,653 times
Reputation: 1183
A) link 1

Are Black people from Baltimore, Philly, and DC very similar?

B) link 2

In your opinion U146, where can I find the best hoagies in Philadelphia?

C) link 3

You know Richmond well, where can I find the best bar in RVA?

D) link 4

Wait, you haven't been to Philadelphia or Richmond yet despite being all over PA and VA? Perfectly normal, most people travel to California a lot and fail to see LA, the Bay Area, San Diego, and Sacramento.
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Old 05-07-2016, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,227,304 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
I back myself up with universities. Labov's is about 50% (of course it isn't super precise) though, like Tezcatlipoca said there is "undersampling" in Maryland: they don't have a lot of samples in isogloss areas and therefore can't tell where the Baltimore accent ends.
So do I. And universities aren't the sole experts of linguistics either. You're too arrogant to get that. Labov is not 50%...it's well over 50% and you know it. Stop trying to stretch the truth. Only Southern Maryland is in the Southern dialect range. The rest of the state isn't. I think you just like to pick apart any source that contradicts you because your personal opinion has such a strong influence over you that it has to be the truth no matter what. Pathetic.
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Old 05-07-2016, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,227,304 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
A) link 1

Are Black people from Baltimore, Philly, and DC very similar?

B) link 2

In your opinion U146, where can I find the best hoagies in Philadelphia?

C) link 3

You know Richmond well, where can I find the best bar in RVA?

D) link 4

Wait, you haven't been to Philadelphia or Richmond yet despite being all over PA and VA? Perfectly normal, most people travel to California a lot and fail to see LA, the Bay Area, San Diego, and Sacramento.
I don't have to know Philadelphia or Richmond well to know what dialect ranges they fall in and what their cultures are....I can get that from friends which I have. You seem to think personal experience trumps linguistic studies, etc. I've got news for you. You're wrong.
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Old 05-07-2016, 10:23 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,742 posts, read 6,146,579 times
Reputation: 3590
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
Well, Mid-Atlantic can mean "former middle colonies" or it can mean "places that are northeastern in recent broad definitions" (think VA, DC etc.).

I don't see what makes Baltimore of all cities quintessentially Mid-Atlantic.
I don't care about what it can mean, I'm talking about what it does mean. Maryland is the epicenter of the Mid-Atlantic, with Baltimore being the best representative of Mid Atlantic culture.
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Old 05-07-2016, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Are Black people from Baltimore, Philly, and DC very similar?
LOL No. Not no, but heck no.
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