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Old 05-19-2016, 11:12 AM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,498,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Where's the evidence of that?
It's in the numbers. According to the poll, 46% percent of Marylanders consider the state Northern and 38% consider it Southern. The remaining 16% would fall into the categories of neither, both, or they don't know. Thus, the majority of Marylanders polled (54%) don't consider it a Northern state, at least entirely. So I'm not seeing this "decisively Northern" thing.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,233,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
It's in the numbers. According to the poll, 46% percent of Marylanders consider the state Northern and 38% consider it Southern. The remaining 16% would fall into the categories of neither, both, or they don't know. Thus, the majority of Marylanders polled (54%) don't consider it a Northern state, at least entirely. So I'm not seeing this "decisively Northern" thing.
The correct answer us that 46% consider the state Northern, 38% southern, and 16% undecided. You still have more people calling it Northern than Southern. Agree to disagree.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:39 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 778,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
The Mid-Atlantic excluding the Southern states you consider to be part of it (VA, NC) is more like New England than the South.
How?
Maryland for example: it's not linguistically like New England in any way, and historically it's definitely not like New England. It has a very slight plurality Catholic, but by nowhere near the same margin as New England which used to have a majority and now has a significant plurality. In cuisine, Maryland resembles coastal Virginia in the East and Southern PA in the west, neither like New England.

I'm not looking to refute that MD is northeastern, so don't give me a one line answer.
I just want to know what you consider the common traits of New England and the Mid-Atlantic.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,308 posts, read 26,320,585 times
Reputation: 11772
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Sources please. In a study done by I believe the University of Texas, the amount of Marylanders who thought the state was southern was somewhere in the 40th percentile, Northern in the 60th percentile. I don't have the exact numbers but I know what I read. The vast majority of Marylanders do not consider their state to be part of the South.
You're talking about UNC's Southern Focus poll and that's *not* what it said. You're right about the 40% part, but wrong about the "Northern 60th percentile part." The question in that poll wasn't "Is Maryland Northern or Southern" but rather simply "Is Maryland a Southern state?" Respondents answering "no" are a combination of people who think it is a Northern state, people who think it is both Northern and Southern, and people who think it is neither. It does not mean that anyone who thinks Maryland isn't a Southern state by default believes it is a Northern state.
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Old 05-19-2016, 12:07 PM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,498,725 times
Reputation: 18567
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
The correct answer us that 46% consider the state Northern, 38% southern, and 16% undecided. You still have more people calling it Northern than Southern. Agree to disagree.
The correct answer is that you have more people calling it Southern or "other" than Northern. That's not "decisively Northern."
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Old 05-19-2016, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,233,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The correct answer is that you have more people calling it Southern or "other" than Northern. That's not "decisively Northern."
Draw your own conclusions.
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Old 05-19-2016, 01:32 PM
Status: "They say progress but I see degeneracy." (set 4 days ago)
 
1,246 posts, read 588,757 times
Reputation: 1232
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Yea, you definitely need to visit--outside of the (transient) beach towns, it's like a different world, imo. There's a reason everything below the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal is called "Slower Lower", but it really kicks in once you leave Kent County for Sussex County. Mainly rural outside of the big-box stores around highway 13/113, filled with retirees, very conservative, and Southern in speech ("Punkin Chunkin"). But yea, there's a lot of seafood in the area--it's essentially the same catch served in Maryland, so Old Bay and that whole crab culture is big down there.
Yeah, Iíll probably make a day trip out of it in June because it does sound interesting. I read up on the area and is seems the culture came from MD back in the day and remained more intact (Lord Baltimore encouraged settlement to that part of DEÖ.still strange that it didnít take on a more rural PA like culture but it does border MDÖ.). Love seafood so that would be a good trip.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Really??? There are similarities of course, but there's such a drastic size difference that prevents me from saying that they are just alike. For one, Wilmington is a LOT slower...like a LOT. Downtown Wilmington on a Sunday afternoon is dead as a doornail, while in Philly, Center City is very vibrant. Overall, Wilmington reminded more of Richmond than Philly although I know that culturally, Wilmington is closer to Philly.
When I say it is just like Philly. I mean that the Wilmington neighborhoods, people, culture, and stuff wouldnít be out of place in Philadelphia (it kind of goes without saying sense itís a satellite city). It also helps that I took SEPTA there.
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Old 05-19-2016, 03:23 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 699,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
I said MOST of Maryland, not all of it. That Aschmann map I gave is just as valid as those other two, you just scoff at it because you think anything not done by a university is a load of crap...MANY consider that map valid. And it only included the southern parts of Anne Arundel County and PG County, not the entire counties themselves. The University of Hawaii map has no sample speakers either, so I don't consider that to be a valid study, unlike Aschmann and University of Pennsylvania. Central and Northern Maryland don't share the same dialect as Virginia except for NOVA and that's pretty much indisputable. Your attempt to pick my statements apart is pathetic. I know you and BajanYankee believe Maryland is Southern, but the truth is it isn't. If you don't agree with me, go away.
So you're saying the university pulled the info out of their rear ends? Aschmann is not professional (remember when he said linguistics is just a hobby of his), so we have to take some details with a grain of salt. Aschmann has few samples from Maryland outside of Baltimore, and the ones he does have are mostly of politicians who do not have any Maryland accent (even though there are better examples of the accents that can be found online). Aschmann simply was not focused on the Maryland accents, and so he missed a few things. Just because he puts all of the accent descriptions right on the map does not mean that his research is more intense or that his map is more correct than those of professional linguists.

By the way, you still have yet to answer my question: How is Maryland culture a world apart from Virginia's? And don't respond with some nebulous statement that is about what you think I believe and not about my question this time.
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Old 05-19-2016, 03:27 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 699,389 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
I said MOST of Maryland, not all of it. That Aschmann map I gave is just as valid as those other two, you just scoff at it because you think anything not done by a university is a load of crap...MANY consider that map valid. And it only included the southern parts of Anne Arundel County and PG County, not the entire counties themselves. The University of Hawaii map has no sample speakers either, so I don't consider that to be a valid study, unlike Aschmann and University of Pennsylvania. Central and Northern Maryland don't share the same dialect as Virginia except for NOVA and that's pretty much indisputable. Your attempt to pick my statements apart is pathetic. I know you and BajanYankee believe Maryland is Southern, but the truth is it isn't. If you don't agree with me, go away.
It included about half (and that's being conservative for you) of AA and PG Cos. Either way, those counties were fully in the "southern" region as was Virginia. Since you want to nitpick.

And now I pose a question to all: why would all these people from "Arch City" have so much pain regarding the classification of Maryland and Virginia?
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Old 05-19-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,233,040 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
So you're saying the university pulled the info out of their rear ends? Aschmann is not professional (remember when he said linguistics is just a hobby of his), so we have to take some details with a grain of salt. Aschmann has few samples from Maryland outside of Baltimore, and the ones he does have are mostly of politicians who do not have any Maryland accent (even though there are better examples of the accents that can be found online). Aschmann simply was not focused on the Maryland accents, and so he missed a few things. Just because he puts all of the accent descriptions right on the map does not mean that his research is more intense or that his map is more correct than those of professional linguists.

By the way, you still have yet to answer my question: How is Maryland culture a world apart from Virginia's? And don't respond with some nebulous statement that is about what you think I believe and not about my question this time.
Nothing satisfies you. You ignore what contradicts you and go with what supports you. You're interested in getting me to say or do something that will jeopardize my user ship. I'm putting you on ignore soon. Get lost.
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