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Old 11-15-2011, 11:42 PM
 
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What are some belief systems for rural and urban? And to some extent suburban.

I feel rural is more conservative and religious.
urban is more liberal and agnostic.
suburban is a mix or liberal or conservative and is religious.

I think urban has more single young people where rural and suburban has more families.

I feel rural and suburban are auto dependent where urban offers affordable public transportation options.

I feel urban has more access to health care, high speed internet, shopping, education, restaurants, and entertainment venues.

Where as rural offers more safety, less traffic, and more nature.

Suburban offers more safety and same access to health care, shopping, and sometimes education.

I also know suburban and rural do alot of commuting where urban you live closer to work or can you public transportation to work.

I also feel rural and suburban are more white where urban has more diversity.

I also feel urban is more modern where rural is more traditional. Urban having modern buildings and old buildings where rural is usually more old buildings.
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Old 11-16-2011, 03:18 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
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Way to go out on a limb there.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:04 PM
 
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Also want to add that in urban and suburban people are more rushed while rural is laid back. Also spending is big in suburban and urban.

Also usually in urban people use public transit and live in an apartment and suburban and rural are in houses and usually use cars to commute to work.

Usually I also see private schools in downtowns. The private school in our urban area is multiple stories, and has an underground parking garage. It enrolls about 200 students. The main high school is in a suburban area and enrolls 1,6000 students.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:58 PM
 
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Also in suburban you will see shopping centers with big box stores like Costco, Home Depot, Target, Wal-Mart, K-Mart, OSH, Lowe's, BJ's Wholesale, Sam's Club, enclosed malls, and lifestyle centers with the usually clothing department stores.

Also in rural you will start seeing Wal-Mart and Home Depots. My rural town though has a Trader Joes, but I would say its in a more low density suburban area.

Urban stores would be like organic markets like Whole Foods and Trader Joes. High-end clothing stores like American Apparel, Urban Outfitters, Banana Republic, Chanel, etc, and also sometimes high-end department stores are also found in urban areas. Example is downtown San Francisco with Union Square or Westwood Village in LA which has Urban Outfitters and Whole Foods.

All though very poor downtowns sometimes have complete opposites. I know a run-down downtown with a mall that has low-income shops and the most ghetto Macy's and Sear's.

Some poor downtowns then sometimes have a lack of businesses of any type.

I think a majority of America lives in the suburban and then another percentage lives in urban downtowns and in urban areas of cities. And a very few amount live in rural.
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:04 PM
 
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I think it varies depending on the city, state, or region.
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Old 11-17-2011, 12:27 AM
 
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I think both urban areas and rural areas have in common their concern over suburban sprawl, for different but related and close reasons.

Urban areas are filled with liberals who have concern for the enviornment, who dislike suburban sprawl which destroys wildlife habitat. They also see people who flee to the suburbs as the cause of the lack of tax dollars and the decline of the city. Urbanites criticize the culture of consumption that suburbs are thought to be built upon, especially since they use much more resources per capita of almost every type compared to urbanites.

A few rural people also are concerned about the enviornment and dislike suburban sprawl gobble up farmland and pristine wilderness they like and enjoy in rural areas. However many rural people simply dislike the loss of their feeling of being more alone with nature when suburbs creep in and bring with them "development" which many rural people dislike, understandably.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
What are some belief systems for rural and urban? And to some extent suburban.

I feel rural is more conservative and religious.
urban is more liberal and agnostic.
suburban is a mix or liberal or conservative and is religious.

I think urban has more single young people where rural and suburban has more families.

I feel rural and suburban are auto dependent where urban offers affordable public transportation options.

I feel urban has more access to health care, high speed internet, shopping, education, restaurants, and entertainment venues.

Where as rural offers more safety, less traffic, and more nature.

Suburban offers more safety and same access to health care, shopping, and sometimes education.

I also know suburban and rural do alot of commuting where urban you live closer to work or can you public transportation to work.

I also feel rural and suburban are more white where urban has more diversity.

I also feel urban is more modern where rural is more traditional. Urban having modern buildings and old buildings where rural is usually more old buildings.
Much of these are based on stereotypes that are only true of certain segments in a big city. In reality cities as big and diverse as Chicago are way too complex to pigeonhole. I will examine several of these statements.

urban is more liberal and agnostic.
There are plenty of religious people in big cities, in fact growing up I often associated Chicago with Catholicism and rural areas with evangelicals. The middle class parts of the city with the old Catholic ethnic groups are just as religious as any other part of America. The newly arrived oftentimes hispanic immigrants are often quite religions, african americans tend to be quite religious as well. It is true that in big cities agnostics and atheists can find groups of like minded people easier and a greater degree of tolerance than in suburban and rural areas but even so it varies by neighborhood, they would probably mostly be found near major universities and neighborhoods where yuppies and hipsters live. Overall big cities might be a tad less religious only because it runs the full spectrum from totally secular to pretty religious but really religious people should have nothing to fear living in big cities, more likely than not they can find like minded circles of people in practically any faith. If you are a total fundamentalist who absolutely cannot live around people who believe differently than you it can become a problem. Honestly anyone who would fear losing their faith in a big city probably didn't have much to begin with anyways. Nearly all of the most religious people I have ever known are life long Chicagoans.

I think urban has more single young people where rural and suburban has more families.
I don't deny that there are a higher percentage of middle class families with kids in suburban areas but people also tend to overestimate the young single population in many cities, they are still a minority. In Chicago poor and working class families outnumber people that would be considered childless yuppies. The middle class is also pretty strong in parts of Chicago and there are many family friendly neighborhoods with kids.

Honestly cities in my view are for everyone unless you just like living in a rural area for whatever reason. I mean even from a political point of view I think it is easier to be a conservative in a Democratic leaning big city than a liberal in a Republican leaning rural area. I know plenty of people in Chicago who harbor quite conservative views on a broad range of issues, even those who are registered Democrats who vote mostly the party line, Chicago is much more about the Democratic party than it is liberalism as an ideology. In rural areas that are Republican there is much more pressure to conform to conservative ideology.

Really I can't think of many cities in the US that can be pigeon holed as liberal, secular and for single young people. Perhaps San Francisco is the closest to that but people from there would know better than I.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,046 posts, read 2,475,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
What are some belief systems for rural and urban? And to some extent suburban.

I feel rural is more conservative and religious.
urban is more liberal and agnostic.
suburban is a mix or liberal or conservative and is religious.
A little bit, but not to that much extent, particularly with religion. I think that's more of an age or regional thing.

I think urban has more single young people where rural and suburban has more families.
Somewhat. There are single young people everywhere, but the ones in urban areas are more visible.

I feel rural and suburban are auto dependent where urban offers affordable public transportation options.
This really depends on the urban area. This might be true in New York, Boston, and San Francisco. In many other areas, urban populations depend on cars as well. Plus, affordable public transportation often reaches into the suburbs and even in rural areas there are transportation shuttles for elderly and disabled people.

I feel urban has more access to health care, high speed internet, shopping, education, restaurants, and entertainment venues.
If you're in a frontier area, possibly, but for rural areas within an hour or so of a decent-sized city, these options just mean people have to drive a little bit. I would disagree about including education here, as many rural districts are better than many urban ones.

Where as rural offers more safety, less traffic, and more nature.
Mostly true, although once again areas with nature are usually accessible to those in urban areas.

Suburban offers more safety and same access to health care, shopping, and sometimes education.
Education would be the same if not better in suburban areas.

I also know suburban and rural do alot of commuting where urban you live closer to work or can you public transportation to work.
Not all jobs are in urban areas, so I'd have to disagree with differences between urban and suburban for the most part. Rural areas may have commutes, but not always.

I also feel rural and suburban are more white where urban has more diversity.
This depends on where you live. In Michigan, where I'm from, this would be true. But it's not true in many parts of the South, Southwest, or places where there isn't a lot of diversity in the urban areas either.

I also feel urban is more modern where rural is more traditional. Urban having modern buildings and old buildings where rural is usually more old buildings.
I'm going to have to disagree on this one. I see modern buildings in rural areas all of the time, and older ones in urban areas. Suburban areas seem to lean towards new buildings, though.
My comments in red.
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:26 PM
 
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Yes those people out in the country ride those 1928 John Deere tractors to town
Have you ever Left the city?
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Old 11-17-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Also in suburban you will see shopping centers with big box stores like Costco, Home Depot, Target, Wal-Mart, K-Mart, OSH, Lowe's, BJ's Wholesale, Sam's Club, enclosed malls, and lifestyle centers with the usually clothing department stores.

Also in rural you will start seeing Wal-Mart and Home Depots. My rural town though has a Trader Joes, but I would say its in a more low density suburban area.

Urban stores would be like organic markets like Whole Foods and Trader Joes. High-end clothing stores like American Apparel, Urban Outfitters, Banana Republic, Chanel, etc, and also sometimes high-end department stores are also found in urban areas. Example is downtown San Francisco with Union Square or Westwood Village in LA which has Urban Outfitters and Whole Foods.

All though very poor downtowns sometimes have complete opposites. I know a run-down downtown with a mall that has low-income shops and the most ghetto Macy's and Sear's.

Some poor downtowns then sometimes have a lack of businesses of any type.

I think a majority of America lives in the suburban and then another percentage lives in urban downtowns and in urban areas of cities. And a very few amount live in rural.
Okay, people tend to shop in stores that are close to them. But beyond that, it's a bunch of chaos. It's hard to predict what types of stores people will frequent based on where they live. There's a lot more space in suburban areas than in urban areas and a lot higher density going in descending order from urban to suburban to rural areas. But you can, for example, find small businesses of all types in all three settings quite easily.

Not too many people live on farms, but few more people live in rural areas. They often start to blend in with suburban areas, though. There are still, however, more people in the suburban and urban areas. That being said, a lot of people jump from one to another based on life circumstances, going to college, etc., so the lines blur more than you might expect.
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