U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-20-2011, 05:13 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,647,983 times
Reputation: 280

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakparkdude View Post
A house's foundation must extend below the frost line. In the north, that means you have to dig down fairly deep for the foundation. Since you've already gone through the trouble and expense of digging a deep foundation, you might as well finish the space and add useable square footage to the house. In warmer climates, digging deeply is not necessary, so full basements require additional expense over the minimum.

Okay I understand !!!
Quote:

The vast majority of homes in Phoenix are not small at all.
The area I was looking in was in the old area of Phoenix do to you can tell by the way thay are naming the streets 3 ave ,4 ave ,42 ave so on and the fact the area is on a grid system or modified grid system.

I believe they are wartime homes. Most homes built doing the war are very small .

Most homes built in the 50's and 60's in US and Canada are small too but bigger than the wartime homes ( 3 bedrooms and one bathroom is the standard of the upbringing of the middle class in the 50's and 60's .It is not to 70's and 80's to homes got much bigger.

The back alleys ,grid system or modified grid system is dead give away the area is pre 50's or pre 60's.


Some of the areas.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...,132.04,,0,2.7

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...205.05,,0,9.34

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...95.67,,0,14.29

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...5,,0,8.55&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...9.94,,0,0&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...3,,0,1.69&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...,,0,12.82&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...5,,0,8.33&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...,,0,-0.79&z=17

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll...2,,0,0.45&z=17

Last edited by sweat209; 11-20-2011 at 05:33 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-20-2011, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,759,267 times
Reputation: 1616
What exactly do you find surprising about home sizes in Phoenix? As you said, those neighbourhoods in Phoenix are from around the 40s and 50s, when most other cities were building small homes too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2011, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,383 posts, read 1,688,416 times
Reputation: 1709
Basements in Albuquerque are a rarity indeed. And we are in the high desert where it can get rather cold at night under clear skies in the winter, so we do need heating. But our heating here is mostly done with natural gas or even through wood burning.

As for the houses here being small, I really don't understand how one can think anything over 1,200 square feet is small even in this era of McMansions. But Albuquerque experienced a great deal of its population growth during two times when houses that size were considered large or became the norm. These periods were post-World War II through the early sixties and during the last decade when there were plenty of McMansions built but also plenty of houses built on smaller lots which often forced them to be smaller overall than those built during the seventies, eighties and nineties.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 11:24 AM
 
9,028 posts, read 16,421,659 times
Reputation: 6814
I'm not sure I get this thread

The poster above nailed it that you don't need basements in phoenix as you don't have to go too far before getting below the frost line.

I think a lot of the earlier homes were built smaller, often of block to take advantage of the cooling available at that time .... many people did (and still do) work with evaporative "swamp" coolers .... with the increase in efficiency and decrease in cost of central air that is now the standard and you have a really good mix of two story & single story homes out here

yes, the whole metro is pretty much on a grid system

for those interested you start at a central point (for east to west this is central ave) - streets get larger as you work east, avenues get larger as you work west ..... there are plenty of new neighborhoods that fit into the grid

You can start at a nice new neighborhood at 173rd avenue & van buren - take van buren 20 miles east through all sorts of neighborhoods and end up in downtown phoenix and then stretch through all sorts of neighborhoods going east until you end up at the airport

Another example is you could start out past 200th Ave & Indian School in the Verrado Development

http://www.viewallazhomes.com/Photos/ARMLS/Thumbnails/-20110904155226447798000000-1.jpeg (broken link) http://thekroneteam.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Verrado.jpg (broken link)

you will have a mix of old & new as you head east - including the old Maryvale area that was setup to be for working class families and basically turned into a lower income area



You'll even come across the Arizona Country Club



Before ending out at 126th street on the east side of town - a good 40 miles away - in another newer development
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 11:38 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,345,392 times
Reputation: 22356
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
I have seen alot of very small homes and dwellings in Phoenix and Albuquerque and more so Phoenix not sure why .

Anyone know the history why there is so many very small homes and dwellings ? I know in Los Angeles south central doing ww2 many poor black people moved there to work in factories and segregation of black people in areas of LA is factor of why some areas in LA have those small war time homes.

Not sure on the history of Albuquerque and Phoenix. Not even sure where the old sections are in Albuquerque and Phoenix has I do not know Albuquerque and Phoenix area that well.
Generally speaking most houses for working class people were much smaller in the 1950s and 1960s than they are today. The houses you are referring to were probably constructed during that era.

20yrsinBranson
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2011, 09:47 PM
 
170 posts, read 272,665 times
Reputation: 143
Homes in the Phoenix area and the rest of the southwest are smaller because they do not have basements or attics, like in the midwest and other regions. The ground is desert and much to rock hard to dig basements.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2011, 12:53 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
Reputation: 1798
In most areas, basements (even if they're finished) are not counted in the square footage of the home. So the lack of basements in AZ doesn't explain this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Not sure why, but it looks like you're correct. The average home size is Phoenix is around 1,800sf, while in the USA as a whole it's around 2,700.

Do they not have basements?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2011, 11:34 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Most places in the sun belt cities do not.

The reason Canada must have basements is do to the weather you need a hot water tank and furnace this is put in the basement.

In the sun belt cities you do not need heating.
No, the reason people have basements isn't so you can put your furnace down there (why would that be different from an A/C unit? - and don't people down south have hot water tanks??).

Basements are normally because you need to dig below the frost line, and if you're going to go down 4 feet or so, might as well just dig out a bit more and double up on livable space. Most houses where I grew up are walk out basement, ranch style houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2011, 11:38 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
^^ also - don't people down south have heaters?? I know Phoenix lows are around 40 degrees in the winter, and it's not crazy to get ice storms or snowstorms down south from time to time. I doubt they can just not have a furnace. I mean it's below freezing in Atlanta often during the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-22-2011, 02:34 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,577,740 times
Reputation: 1266
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Most places in the sun belt cities do not.

The reason Canada must have basements is do to the weather you need a hot water tank and furnace this is put in the basement.

In the sun belt cities you do not need heating.
Do not need heating?

I live in the Atlanta area, and it can get downright cold in the winter. To be without heat would be miserable.

Lots of homes in northern Georgia/Atlanta area have basements and heating, and we're in the "Sunbelt".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top