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Old 11-23-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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I wanted to open a thread about places that are in regions that have little or no cultural ties to Mexico or Latin American countries, yet have huge Hispanic populations (in number or concentration). For the sake of this conversation, lets define significant as 40% or greater in concentration or over 500,000 in number by either city or metro area.

I got the idea for this thread as I was going through Western Kansas a couple of weeks ago. I went through the towns of Liberal and Dodge City. In both cities it is obvious that Mexican culture is dominant. In the Wal Mart in Liberal the signs are in Spanish first in some cases and English second. Most of the people that I came into contact with were also Hispanic. Im not as familiar with Kansas state history, but I know that most of the state has a fairly low Hispanic concentration.

Being a stickler for data, I looked up the population statistics and my observations seemed right. Below are some examples of what Im talking about. First by city:

Liberal, KS: 58.7% Hispanic
US2010

Dodge City, KS: 57.5% Hispanic
US2010

Garden City, KS: 48.7% Hispanic
US2010

Dalton, GA: 48.0% Hispanic
US2010

Yakima, WA: 41.4% Hispanic
US2010

Guymon, OK: 51.5% Hispanic
US2010

By Metro Area:

Atlanta 547,400 Hispanic residents:
US2010

Chicago: 1,957,080 Hispanic residents:
US2010

Washington DC: 750,795 Hispanic residents:
US2010

Denver, CO: 571,131 Hispanic residents:
US2010

Dallas, TX 1,752,171 Hispanic residents: (this one is debatable, but North Texas hasnt had many ties to Latin America historically):
US2010

What are your thoughts?
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:20 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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The immediate regions of both Houston and Dallas, in reality, had not been culturally tied to Latin America or Spain until recent times, but since Texas was Mexico, at one point in history, it's a common misconception that these two cities have always been Mexican influenced.
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Old 11-24-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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There are some cities in the Northeast with pretty high Hispanic percentages. Same with other Midwestern cities.
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:01 AM
 
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Also, Gainesville GA, and northwest AR (both poultry-producing areas). Siler City, NC and to some extent the tobacco belt of eastern NC. Not sure about southern DE ? Possibly the Hormel meat plant in Austin MN ?
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:35 AM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,964,539 times
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http://www.city-data.com/city/Cicero-Illinois.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Lawren...achusetts.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Lexington-Nebraska.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Pasco-Washington.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Woodburn-Oregon.html

Granted some or many of these are more like suburbs or adjuncts to a city.

For some smallish towns the following are on City-Data's "Most residents born in Latin America" list.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Mattawa-Washington.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Royal-...ashington.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/George-Washington.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Wendover-Utah.html
http://www.city-data.com/top2/h131.html

I think a fair amount of agricultural areas received Mexican immigrants. Also construction was a big area so maybe places where there are almost more roads or buildings than people fit too. Puerto Ricans and Cubans went to the Northeast a fair amount.

Not sure it relates to that, but Hartford, Connecticut looks to be plurality Hispanic according to City-Data.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Hartford-Connecticut.html

Last edited by Thomas R.; 11-25-2011 at 10:50 AM..
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Old 11-26-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Chicago
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Old 11-26-2011, 04:10 PM
 
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I was a little surprised when I moved to Chicago that there were around 2 million hispanics. Chicago isn't near any latin american countries, and historically there wasn't any large tie to latin america until the past few decades. Yes, I know there have been hispanics and populations of people in Chicago for a long time, but not on the level of millions of people. They're responsible for the population growth in the region.

Illinois (most are in Chicagoland)

2010: 2,030,000
2000: 1,530,000
1990: 904,000
1980: 639,000

Last edited by Chicago60614; 11-26-2011 at 04:22 PM..
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
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I'd say Dallas; to some extent, Houston area has historical ties with Latin countries.
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Old 11-27-2011, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
I'd say Dallas; to some extent, Houston area has historical ties with Latin countries.
Yes.
Southwestern towns have ties to Latin America so they shouldn't be here.
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:19 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,113,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
The immediate regions of both Houston and Dallas, in reality, had not been culturally tied to Latin America or Spain until recent times, but since Texas was Mexico, at one point in history, it's a common misconception that these two cities have always been Mexican influenced.
Agree absolutely! Unlike in the interior SW states, a large and influencial hispanic population has not been the rule in most of Texas (save perhaps the far western and far southern parts) until fairly recently in the whole scheme of things.

Quote:
Blkgiraffe wrote: I'd say Dallas; to some extent, Houston area has historical ties with Latin countries.
I had have to take some issue with that one, BlkG. Not saying you are wrong, necessarily, but can you explain a bit more?
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