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Old 12-02-2011, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Monsey, NY
19 posts, read 25,294 times
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San Francisco Bay Area and most West coast
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Old 12-02-2011, 01:48 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,301,005 times
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Funny use of the term climate change

Anyway, when you look at that map, it looks like it's Texas, it has the widest spectrum of colors, at least today

Weather Forecast - United States - Local & Long Range | Wunderground : Weather Underground
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Old 12-02-2011, 01:54 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,148,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Funny use of the term climate change

Anyway, when you look at that map, it looks like it's Texas, it has the widest spectrum of colors, at least today

Weather Forecast - United States - Local & Long Range | Wunderground : Weather Underground

And these maps change dramatically

Look at MD or SC for example forecasted for the 7th

Weather Forecast - United States - Local & Long Range | Wunderground : Weather Underground
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Old 12-02-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,374 posts, read 19,301,005 times
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Brrr, looks like it's gonna get real chilly anywhere west of the Appalachians

I assume the climate varies more where there is a coast.
Maybe the hardiness zone map is a good indicator, as it covers the entire year

http://www.baileynurseries.com/media...nt/zonemap.jpg

Maybe it's Colorado, Arizona, California, Washington state, or even Montana. Size matters


According to this, somewhat clearer, map Alaska might have the most climate zones, then again, it is a rather huge state...

http://www.thebiopod.com/images/usda_map_full.jpg

Last edited by Neuling; 12-02-2011 at 02:32 PM..
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Old 12-02-2011, 02:28 PM
 
605 posts, read 1,234,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emilio- View Post
San Francisco Bay Area and most West coast
Agreed with this. It has to be one of the western states. This is where you have the greatest variability in climate within short distances due to terrain and proximity to the ocean.
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Old 12-04-2011, 12:40 AM
 
5,549 posts, read 6,976,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mstnghu2 View Post
Definitely. It can be foggy and 55 degrees on a July day sometimes in San Francisco and can be 90 degrees at the same time in places like Walnut Creek and Danville. Similarly, in the summer it can be 80 degrees in San Jose and sunny and you can head over the hill to Santa Cruz and it's 60 degrees and overcast.

I was thinking of Half Moon Bay - drizzly and 55 degrees on one side of the hill, 80 degrees and sunny on the other side.
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Oregon
292 posts, read 637,579 times
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I cannot believe that Oregon or Washington isn't once mentioned in this forums. These state has the greatest amount of micro-climates and much more intense change. Even more than California.
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:27 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,958,982 times
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Originally Posted by Or3g0n View Post
I cannot believe that Oregon or Washington isn't once mentioned in this forums. These state has the greatest amount of micro-climates and much more intense change. Even more than California.
I haven't posted, but I almost thought of those two. I was thinking maybe people would think they were "too big" to count as "short distances" but they're not any bigger than California. There's certainly a big difference between East and West in those states. Kennewick and Yakima are listed here as among the lowest for average humidity, but Bellingham, Washington is listed as the highest in humidity. Bellingham and Yakima are about 226 miles. However Tacoma is listed like in the top-ten for humidity and is just a 156 miles from Yakima and some high-humidity town called Kent looked even closer to Yakima.

http://www.city-data.com/top2/c486.html
http://www.city-data.com/top2/c485.html

I was thinking New Mexico, but it's not particularly small and I guess it's less variable than Arizona. Arizona looks real variable as it has some of the snowiest and least snowy places in the US.

http://www.city-data.com/top2/c464.html
http://www.city-data.com/top2/c465.html

Although Yuma and Flagstaff look to be 322 miles apart, so not real close. I think I was thinking of New Mexico because my Aunt had more to say about the mountainous parts of it.

Last edited by Thomas R.; 12-04-2011 at 09:37 PM..
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Old 12-04-2011, 10:03 PM
 
7,282 posts, read 13,523,592 times
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The biggest change I've experienced, personally, is driving up Mt Lemmon outside of Tucson. You go from saguaros to deciduous forest in, what, 40 minutes? Along the way you drive through a wide array of foliage types, and the temperature drops substantially. I went in September, and it was like driving from a desert summer to a mountain fall in way under an hour. I think it's something like 6,000+ feet in elevation gain.
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Old 12-05-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Oregon
292 posts, read 637,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I was thinking New Mexico, but it's not particularly small and I guess it's less variable than Arizona. Arizona looks real variable as it has some of the snowiest and least snowy places in the US.
Actually, Washington and Oregon Cascades receive the most amount of annual snow in the United States including around the entire world. Mt. Hood, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Baker, among many of other cascade peaks averages 525 to 685 inches of snow annually with worst annual snow at beastly 300 inches. The snowiest spot in the Earth is in Mt. Baker, which is located in North Cascades National Park in Washington, received 1,140 inches of snow in 1998-1999. That's 95 feet of snow. Mt. Rainier came second, also taking second spot in World's snowiest list, with 1,022 inches of snow. Out of the years the recording began in 1900s, Mt. Rainier received 800 plus inches of snow in a year over 50 times.

Last edited by Or3g0n; 12-05-2011 at 02:35 PM..
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