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Old 12-13-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,287,970 times
Reputation: 3827

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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Damn, you beat me to it. Could you just fathom walking down the street and a tsunami of molasses coming your way? The citizens of the North End must have been like "My house is surrounded by molasses, this really sucks".
I love the idea of reading an obituary stating cause of death as "molasses tsunami."
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Old 12-13-2011, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,203,959 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by oakparkdude View Post
I love the idea of reading an obituary stating cause of death as "molasses tsunami."
Yeah, I imagine it would be a bit like seeing screaming headlines about a deadly tortoise stampede.
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
St. Louis has actually been hit by more tornadoes, or deadly tornados, i would suspect the former, than any other city I believe. It's also about 150 miles to the north of a deadly fault line. Also, St. Louis for much of the 19th century was the largest city west of Pittsburgh. Toasted ravioli, iced tea, the ice cream cone, and the dog all were invented at The 1904 World's Fair.

Also...there is an AMOCO sign that BP left intact that you'll see at the top of the hill you go up when you take the exit to Clayton and Skinker from I-64. That sign was and still is the biggest AMOCO sign in the world. Finally...St. Louis actually once had a third great river before it was put underground and used as a storm drain...the River Des Peres. Technically, you can add two more rivers...the Meramec and the Illinois. St. Louis also i think has one of the oldest symphonies in the United States.
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,259,760 times
Reputation: 36087
Here are some interesting facts about newspapers in two towns that I used to live in:

Gwiazda polarna, published in the little northern Wisconsin town of Stevens Point, is America's oldest Polish language newspaper.

L'Evangeline, a newspaper published in Moncton, New Brunswick, is the only French language newspaper in Canadian Acadia, and is subscribed to by the public library in Lafayette, Louisiana.
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:30 PM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,541,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Yeah, I imagine it would be a bit like seeing screaming headlines about a deadly tortoise stampede.
The Molasses moved at a speed of ~35mph.
and in London a similar event the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Beer_Flood
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Old 12-13-2011, 06:07 PM
 
7,385 posts, read 13,234,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Yeah, I imagine it would be a bit like seeing screaming headlines about a deadly tortoise stampede.

The Molasses moved at a speed of ~35mph.
For it to move that fast, it had to be hot.
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Old 12-13-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,287,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
For it to move that fast, it had to be hot.
Not true.

The Straight Dope: Was Boston once literally flooded with molasses?
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:19 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,237,640 times
Reputation: 1430
Quote:
Originally Posted by oakparkdude View Post
Having my thread turned into an argument about the speed at which a fatal river of molasses can travel wasn't really my intent, but hey, I just wanted it to be interesting.
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:47 PM
 
Location: not new to houston anymore
276 posts, read 737,697 times
Reputation: 252
chicago sent the first african american woman to the senate (carol moseley braun)....then sent the first african american man to the presidency. yay us!

and...
chicago supposedly has the second largest population of poles in the world (after warsaw)
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:00 PM
MPC
 
695 posts, read 988,260 times
Reputation: 490
Mobile, AL at one time was bigger than Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Phoenix, Charlotte, Jacksonville and others.
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