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Old 12-16-2011, 01:47 PM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,532,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
The reference is to the still exisiting collection of originally inhabited structures; regardless these are not even close to the oldest structures or even streets to be found in either. Take it up with the US Governement

History of Elfreth's Alley | Elfreth's Alley : a national historic site

Elfreth's Alley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elfreth's Alley
"It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited residential streets in the country"
Key words
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Old 04-30-2013, 03:55 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,467 posts, read 11,546,746 times
Reputation: 3532
Portland Oregon has both the world's largest and smallest parks within City Limits. Although there has recently come a challenger to the smallest park.
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Old 04-30-2013, 07:13 PM
 
12 posts, read 10,866 times
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Buffalo:

One of only three U.S. cities that has never reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The other two are Miami and Honolulu.

If you travel due south from here, you'll eventually be in the Pacific Ocean.

Western New York:

Nearby Medina, New York has a road that goes underneath the Erie Canal.

Nearby Town Line, New York seceded from the Union during the Civil War and did not re-join until after WWII.

In 50,000 years, Niagara Falls will no longer exist.
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Old 04-30-2013, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,262,848 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapePlan View Post
Buffalo:

One of only three U.S. cities that has never reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The other two are Miami and Honolulu.

If you travel due south from here, you'll eventually be in the Pacific Ocean.

Western New York:

Nearby Medina, New York has a road that goes underneath the Erie Canal.

Nearby Town Line, New York seceded from the Union during the Civil War and did not re-join until after WWII.

In 50,000 years, Niagara Falls will no longer exist.
Miami hit 100 in 1942.
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Old 04-30-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,311,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Miami hit 100 in 1942.
WEIRD! It's crazy to me to think that neither Honolulu nor Miami have reached or exceeded 100 degrees (or nearly never), when both cities would probably be among the last cities people would think of such a stat.....especially Miami!
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Old 04-30-2013, 08:12 PM
 
12 posts, read 10,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Miami hit 100 in 1942.
Not to split hairs, but the Weather Channel's website shows otherwise:

Average Weather for Miami, FL - Temperature and Precipitation

"The highest recorded temperature was 98F"
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,262,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapePlan View Post
Not to split hairs, but the Weather Channel's website shows otherwise:

Average Weather for Miami, FL - Temperature and Precipitation

"The highest recorded temperature was 98F"
Yeah, it doesn't really matter. I think my source was Yahoo! Not the most reliable. It's a cool stat, nonetheless.
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Old 05-01-2013, 01:37 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,728 posts, read 6,134,571 times
Reputation: 3585
That's because tropical places don't have extreme swings in temperature like other places. They're always consistent.
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