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Old 12-19-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowBat View Post
The biggest cultural differences I see are between big city areas and small town areas, wealthy and poor areas, rural and urban areas. These differences apply to ALL regions of the US.
You beat me to it; I was going to say the same thing.

Rural vs Urban is by far the biggest cultural indicator. Small towns in Georgia are more like small towns in NY or Minnesota, than they are like Atlanta. Generally the more crowded an area, the less friendly and trusting people are, since one has to be aware of safety issues. And, the larger cities have higher ratios of immigrants who bring their own countries' cultural values, making them less homogenous than towns and small cities where everyone grew up there and knows each other's families.
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Old 03-01-2012, 08:27 PM
 
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I won't comment on small towns, but I'll comment on large cities representing different regions.

You had better believe that there are big DIFFERENCES.

I've lived in a few different places, liking some and hating others...sometimes there is a lot of built-in provincialism that makes for this regional behavior. I was once looking at a real estate website for a major Texas city and there was this husband/wife realtor team, each wearing a shirt that was basically the flag of Texas...a big turn-off for me, anyway.

I think that, as immigration increases and people continue to move around, this is receding, but I still think there are a lot of differences. LA's "style" is way different from Seattle's, which is way different from Atlanta's, which is way different from NYC's...to the point that most people would feel comfortable in one yet not comfortable in another.
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Old 03-01-2012, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Workaholic? View Post
I say this to many people I know and they completely disagree. They say modern 21st Century American cities are basically the same and they see little if any difference between folks in Little Rock to Boston or Tulsa to Philly.
Those people are smoking crack. Having been to the four cities mentioned here none of them struck me as being very similar to the other.

Last edited by cwa1984; 03-01-2012 at 11:11 PM..
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Old 03-01-2012, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowBat View Post
[font=Century Gothic]The biggest cultural differences I see are between big city areas and small town areas, wealthy and poor areas, rural and urban areas. These differences apply to ALL regions of the US.
Yeah, I don't buy this line of thinking at all. Atlanta is quite a bit different then Las Vegas and people living in Atlanta or going identify better with their fellow Georgians over people from Las Vegas. People from Pittsburgh or going to identify more with their fellow Pennsylvanians then they will with people from Jacksonville Florida. People from Richmond Virginia are going to identify more with their fellow Virginians over people from Phoenix Arizona. Having been to all these places I got to say they are quite a bit different. While homogenization has taken place across the country it tends to be more overrated then not. You can do the same thing with the rural divide taking people from rural Pennsylvania and they will identify more with people from Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, York, etc. then they will with people living in rural New Mexico.

The problem I believe lies in the fact that people stress to much on the supposed vast differences of Conservative and Liberal and think we are in some kind of huge clash of civilizations which tends not be the case in the majority of instances. Yes, there are differences between rural parts of a state and the cities but claiming people living in cities a thousand miles away from each other have more in common with each other then people living 40 miles away is quite a stretch of the imagination.
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:13 PM
 
958 posts, read 924,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Yeah, I don't buy this line of thinking at all. Atlanta is quite a bit different then Las Vegas and people living in Atlanta or going identify better with their fellow Georgians over people from Las Vegas. People from Pittsburgh or going to identify more with their fellow Pennsylvanians then they will with people from Jacksonville Florida. People from Richmond Virginia are going to identify more with their fellow Virginians over people from Phoenix Arizona. Having been to all these places I got to say they are quite a bit different. While homogenization has taken place across the country it tends to be more overrated then not. You can do the same thing with the rural divide taking people from rural Pennsylvania and they will identify more with people from Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, York, etc. then they will with people living in rural New Mexico.

The problem I believe lies in the fact that people stress to much on the supposed vast differences of Conservative and Liberal and think we are in some kind of huge clash of civilizations which tends not be the case in the majority of instances. Yes, there are differences between rural parts of a state and the cities but claiming people living in cities a thousand miles away from each other have more in common with each other then people living 40 miles away is quite a stretch of the imagination.
Exactly.

And in my opinion, the differences between parts of the country are actually growing.
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Not at all compared to Europe
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Obviously there are major cultural differences...every country has them.
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:14 AM
 
1,249 posts, read 2,993,177 times
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Most cultural differences in the U.S. today have to do with affluence or the lack of it.
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