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Old 12-16-2011, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,656 posts, read 27,097,861 times
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St. Louis and Cincinnati were the cities of the Midwest for a while in the 1800s. Then along came a beast on the shores of Lake Michigan in the latter half of the 1800s.
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Old 12-16-2011, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,847 posts, read 11,034,190 times
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New York was "Fun City" during the 1970s (maybe late 1960's) through to the late 1980's. Nice clean up and second Golden Age from the mid 1990s onward. Slight decline due to the current economic conditions.

I think the decline in St. Louis began around the late 1950s after the war and white flight to the burbs. The entire area still ives in its past glories, with only half-arsed efforts to move forward.

Last edited by DinsdalePirahna; 12-16-2011 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 12-16-2011, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,198,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by po-boy View Post

When do you think were the "best of times" for other American cities such as Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Miami
In about 25 years from now
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:19 PM
 
2,490 posts, read 3,750,767 times
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Detroit's golden age was during the early 1900s.

The population skyrocketed from 285,704 residents in 1900 to 993,678 in 1920 before peaking at 1,849,568 in 1950. The auto industry exploded during those years.

Since 1950 however, Detroit has entered a period of great decline. The population has crashed from 1.8 million to only 713,777. For white people, the decline has been larger, the number of white people in Detroit peaked at 1.5 million in 1950 to only 75,758 in 2010.
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:40 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,984,770 times
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I'd say the 1950's and the 1960's were Pittsburgh's peak. That was when the city had the best balance of economic vitality and quality of life. But man, the 1980's were terrible.
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
449 posts, read 820,453 times
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I'd say that Atlanta has had two golden ages. One was from the end of the Civil War to the start of the Great Depression in 1929. The second golden age was from 1950 - 2000. While I don't expect Atlanta to go into a decline, I do expect for growth to level off, and not be nearly at as rapid of a pace.
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Old 12-16-2011, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,129,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 90sman View Post
Detroit's golden age was during the early 1900s.

The population skyrocketed from 285,704 residents in 1900 to 993,678 in 1920 before peaking at 1,849,568 in 1950. The auto industry exploded during those years.

Since 1950 however, Detroit has entered a period of great decline. The population has crashed from 1.8 million to only 713,777. For white people, the decline has been larger, the number of white people in Detroit peaked at 1.5 million in 1950 to only 75,758 in 2010.
Holy white flight. And I thought Los Angeles was bad.
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Old 12-17-2011, 12:16 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,242,333 times
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What's funny about this is that in cities' "golden ages" they were still well below the standard of living we have today. Sure if you were in the upper echelon of Boston society in the 1850s you could probably afford live-in help, but the average middle-class household today (notwithstanding the economy) is far, far more well-off than even monarchs could have dreamed of being just a short time ago. It's great to be able to afford a personal bather, yeah, but most people would prefer hot running water.
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Old 12-17-2011, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
4,008 posts, read 10,457,529 times
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Philadelphia, 1760s - 1780s. It was the largest city in the colonies, and I believe it was the second largest city in the English-speaking world. It was the seat of the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. Benjamin Franklin lived there.
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