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View Poll Results: Does it prove us to be short sighted & fickle?
Yes 11 55.00%
No 9 45.00%
Voters: 20. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-17-2011, 11:42 PM
 
62 posts, read 73,505 times
Reputation: 57

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The US as it is has existed for less than 500 years. Why are we so quick to put a negative stamp like "rust belt" on one of our great regions? People like to act like the "sun belt" is so special when its reign has lasted less than 20 years and is not nearly as dominant as the midwests.

The midwest was americas promised land for nearly 100 years and cities like cleveland, st louis, and detroit were the whose who of best places to live in the US for a long time.

Now in the past couple decades they have fallen on hard times and everyone wants to abandon, talk crap about, and put negative steriotypes on them, especially detroit. The great city that gave us the car, and mowtown, on top of it being the wealthiest, and most state of the art city for a long time.

Do people really believe what happened there can't happen to the south and that the midwest won't rise again?
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Old 12-18-2011, 12:01 AM
 
551 posts, read 999,152 times
Reputation: 455
It is unfortunate that many what are called "rustbelt" cities are places people want to avoid like Detroit or Cleveland. I think it is all because we moved our manufacturing out, but I don't think the south is immune. What happens if we run out of oil, then Texas loses a large part of its economy but then it'd affect all of America in a negative way. I think what we need to do is we have to accept that manufacturing is gone and either take it back from China or invest in our dying cities to make them inhabitable, but that would take a lot of moving around of many ways we do things in order to make happen. I think in America we are short sighted and fickle, very quick to abandon our great cities for the suburbs and leave them to rot. There is some hope for midwestern cities as there is a small movement to revitalize those cities but mostly people don't care and rather live in the suburbs, which prevents the cities from being revitalized since there is no money coming in make them good. I hope one day to see in my lifetime that the "rustbelt" cities because populated and vibrant again like mini-Manhattans. As oil becomes scarcer and gas becomes more expensive, I think many midwesterners and Americans in general will want to live in more urban enviornments, and the empty shells of the midwestern cities that were built to be more dense and mixed use generally will be flocked to hopefully then they will become great cities again.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Chicago Suburbs
121 posts, read 388,943 times
Reputation: 126
The situation in Cleveland that I noticed living there (which I think is nothing like detroit, but could become) is that down town was empty. You'd drive down the streets during the day and not a soul in site, you'd see a suit or two. Downtowns gotta be like Dallas, Chicago, Denver even Salt Lake City has a great diverse downtown.

And a couple decades IS grounds for a label. Maybe less than 10 years it's not. But for 20! YES!
The city has got to keep the youthful crowd around and not tolerate Bligh whatsoever!
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:39 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,301 posts, read 12,243,178 times
Reputation: 8054
Personally, I think the entire USA will be a rustbelt within 10 years.
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Old 12-18-2011, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
1,255 posts, read 2,118,944 times
Reputation: 787
These things happen all the time. Reputation changes, good areas become slums, slums become gentrified,. Rome went from the largest city in the world to a near village in the ruins to a great city once again.

Who knows what that part of the world will be in a hundred years, but there's no to pretend Detroit isn't suffering urban decay just because it was once grand.
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Old 12-18-2011, 07:04 AM
 
21,245 posts, read 30,504,090 times
Reputation: 19710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pauljrnicole View Post
The situation in Cleveland that I noticed living there (which I think is nothing like detroit, but could become) is that down town was empty. You'd drive down the streets during the day and not a soul in site, you'd see a suit or two.
Things are changing...

Cities with the Biggest Growth in Tech Jobs: No. 1 Cleveland - BusinessWeek
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Old 12-19-2011, 08:42 AM
 
11,197 posts, read 22,429,656 times
Reputation: 10947
People talk about "the midwest rising again". I'm pretty sure the region isn't dead or failed. It's gained population every decade since it became part of our country. People look at a region of over 65 million people and all they see is hard up sections of metro Cleveland, Detroit and Gary Indiana. It's a fraction of the population. Hell, most people in metro Detroit are doing ok, and certainly aren't living in the inner city. Most jobs are sevice related, not manufacturing.

There are plenty of cities around the Midwest that are doing just fine, and aren't all RUSTBELT.

Omaha, Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Minneapolis, Chicago, Madison, Iowa City, Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Columbus, etc. etc.
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Old 12-19-2011, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
3,844 posts, read 8,046,156 times
Reputation: 1607
Well how about this data for ya...Rust Belt/Great Lakes region recent unemployment numbers:

October 2011:

1) Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN -- 5.4%
5) Pittsburgh, PA -- 6.4%
6) Rochester, NY -- 6.7%
8) Buffalo, NY -- 7.0%
10) Cleveland, OH -- 7.1%

Unemployment Rates for Large Metropolitan Areas

What's especially interesting is the rise by Rochester, Buffalo, and Cleveland, beating places like Atlanta(9.9%), Charlotte(10.2%), and Las Vegas(13.3%)
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Old 12-19-2011, 09:14 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,498 posts, read 4,391,965 times
Reputation: 2821
I think the term "rustbelt" is understandable and is based on a real decline in some cities, but I agree that people are short-sighted when they assume that current trends can't switch around. The so-called rustbelt cities have their own strengths which may help them revitalize in the future. The whole issue of access to water is huge, and I think most of the cities we're talking about are at a comparative advantage in that regard (even if there are some serious pollution issues to deal with).
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Old 12-19-2011, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,540 posts, read 7,497,086 times
Reputation: 10961
Ive posted my rant on the term "rustbelt" and ill post it again. I live in Michigan, and I have always hated that term. The image of a dead industrial town, masses of unemployed, decaying buildings and rusting shuttered factorys is not an image anyone would want to be tagged with. In my state we have a few towns like that, Detroit and Flint. These towns are terrible places, and that image fits there. However the other 98% of our state looks nothing like that. Almost all of the southern half of the state is typical midwestern farmland, lots of quiet little towns. The northern half of the state is forest, very touristy. We do not appreciate the rust belt image being tagged to our state. Even in the southeast part of the state where Detroit is, that image is only acurate in Detroit proper, NOT in its suburbs. The suburbs of Detroit are quite alive, with lots of money there. They are no different than any other suburban area of the nation. I imagine that there are alot of people in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin that would agree with what I just said, as those states also live with this ugly tag. The fact is we dont use that term here, it is only used by people from other regions that wish to run us down. Maybe they wont be laughing at us as loudly when we are one of the few parts of the country that still have all the water we need. The so called rust belt wont look as bad then when your baking in the desert with no water.
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