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Old 12-16-2013, 08:30 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yep.:
Nope.
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Old 12-16-2013, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Nope.
I won't repeat things...Texas Reb has said it all quite succinctly.
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Old 12-16-2013, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
So in some ways, it remains to be seen whether Texas will remain an essentially Southern state or evolve into a Southwestern one in the next several decades.
I doubt it will ever be a Southwestern state. If anything, I see it evolving into it's own sub-region. Texas just has it's feet in too many different cultural regions already; the South, the great plains, Tex-Mex border culture, and yes, even some Southwestern traits.

Then there's that often-overlooked factor of all the German, Czech, and Polish roots in the central part of the state and certain coastal areas, that has existed there since Texas became a state in the mid-1800's. Part of my own bloodline comes from the Polish part of the mix.

Like Southern Louisiana (but different), Texas is just a very unique mix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I heard you out on this and very much appreciate your point and outlook! Good job of articulating it!

It is like -- from the opposite point of view -- I never could relate to that "western cowboy" aspect of Texas history, which -- after so many years of studying the states history -- just never made sense to me and I could never identify with as concerns the family experiences over the generations of not only my own but all I knew. Most of my own -- and all those I knew -- might have played cowboys and Indians and loved the western movies (as I did), but the history was one of cotton-picking and tenant-farming and Solid South politics. Not true ranching.
See, I used to feel the same way (about the cowboy/rancher thing). Houston is home to the world's largest and most popular rodeo and livestock show, and every year when they'd literally MAKE us kids dress up like cowboys for "Go Western Day" at school, I just never did get it, because I never saw people looking or acting that way in central Houston on any other day of the year (except maybe Halloween). It seemed downright bizarre to me.

Then when my dad was re-married to a San Antonio girl, whose family were all ranchers, I finally understood. Her family are all from Brady, TX, a small town located smack-dead in the geographical center of Texas... and they own a small cattle ranch just outside of town. When I was 14 I spent 3 weeks working at the ranch, and I saw, met, and got to know some REAL authentic cowboys. It was total culture shock to this city kid, but also a real eye-opener. I understood my home state much better after that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I heard you out on this and very much appreciate your point and outlook! Good job of articulating it!
Likewise. Great discussion! Cheers!
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Old 12-16-2013, 09:41 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I won't repeat things...Texas Reb has said it all quite succinctly.
Its his choice if he wants to be Southern. But there are plenty of Texans who do not answer to that designation, such as all the Asians, Hispanics, and foreign Europeans (Italians, Germans, French, Polish, etc).
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Old 12-16-2013, 09:46 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
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Reaffirming my answer to the OP:

Westernmost part of the South : Texas east of the Trinity.
Southernmost part of the South: Somewhere in deep Central Florida (Probably around Lake Okeechobee).
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Old 12-16-2013, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Its his choice if he wants to be Southern. But there are plenty of Texans who do not answer to that designation, such as all the Asians, Hispanics, and foreign Europeans (Italians, Germans, French, Polish, etc).
Well, all I can tell you is that they're free to identify as they like, but they moved to a Southern state - apparently by choice (I doubt many of them were hog tied and drug here).
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampThang View Post
Ahhh Texans and their obsession with being Southern. They will defend it to the end just because no one else sees them as so.

Westernmost: New Orleans
Southernmost: Gainesville
It doesn't really matter if "no one else sees them as Southern" - though that's definitely not true anyway.

Texas IS southern - it's geographically southern, it was a Confederate state, and it shares many common traits with other southern states, especially (but not limited to) the eastern half of the state.

Those are just the facts. Texas is a southern state. It really doesn't matter if others disagree - they're entitled to their opinion, even if their opinion is wrong.
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Old 12-17-2013, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
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Texas is Texas. As it is such a big state, it cannot fit neatly into a single classification. It probably is more Southern than anything else (which is most apparent in the eastern portion of the state), due to its role in the Confederacy, and the fact that the bulk of its first American settlers were from other Southern states, but it also has heavy Midwestern influences (northern Texas is a lot like Kansas and Oklahoma) and Western influences as well. I think we can all agree that it's an incredibly unique state that is pretty much a microcosm of the rest of the US, save the Northeast.
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Old 12-17-2013, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,880 posts, read 36,203,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampThang View Post
Agreed. I think it is best described as heavily southern influenced while not necessarily part of the south.
I guess as long as you don't count geography and history, you can claim that all day long.
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Old 12-17-2013, 11:34 PM
 
363 posts, read 618,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
Texas is Texas. As it is such a big state, it cannot fit neatly into a single classification. It probably is more Southern than anything else (which is most apparent in the eastern portion of the state), due to its role in the Confederacy, and the fact that the bulk of its first American settlers were from other Southern states, but it also has heavy Midwestern influences (northern Texas is a lot like Kansas and Oklahoma) and Western influences as well. I think we can all agree that it's an incredibly unique state that is pretty much a microcosm of the rest of the US, save the Northeast.
What's interesting too is that you mention how North Texas is like Kansas or Oklahoma, if you look at the history of the region, people from all over settled up there including northerners. In fact if I remember, a group of Iowans of Czech descent moved to the northern panhandle in the 1890's and founded a town. Also, i find it interesting in this whole is Texas southern debate that so many say yes. A good friend of mine from the Austin area (Bastrop to be correct), said that while it's southern influenced, its not really the south. According to him its more about Texas pride than southern pride and most people who fly confederate flags are either in the east or up north around Dallas. I also think a lot of the whole texas pride thing in Central TX has to do with so many Germans and Czechs and poles and latinos. Of course they don't see themselves as southern. If I remember there were even Germans killed because they were against slavery in the civil war and people thought they were traitors. So they might be more apt to identify with texas than the south. Just a thought though
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