U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-19-2011, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,331,160 times
Reputation: 6670

Advertisements

I think we can all agree that the South runs straight to the Atlantic coastline: Savannah, Georgia, Wilmington, North Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, etc., and we already have a thread entitled "Northernmost Southern City". But the South also has southern and western boundaries. Los Angeles is at the same latitude as Tupelo, Mississippi, but I doubt anyone would consider it "Southern". Likewise, few would consider Miami or even Brownsville, Texas (93% Hispanic) to be culturally Southern.

So, where are the lines, and what cities are close to them on the "Southern side"?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-19-2011, 06:38 AM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
Reputation: 19622
If speaking "culturally southern" I would hazard to guess the Orlando area as the southern edge. Not so much Orlando specifically any longer but many of the surrounding community's residents are very clearly "southern" in manner and lifestyle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:03 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,578,675 times
Reputation: 1266
Western Most "Southern" Metropolitan area: Odessa, TX or Lubbock, TX

Western Most "Southern" areas/small cities: Southeast New Mexico

Southern Most "Southern" Metropolitan area: Corpus Christi, TX . In Florida, it's probably Gainesville, FL. Ocala is too much of a hybrid these days, as is Daytona Beach. You can find the southern influence thoughout the center areas of the peninsula, often in the majority where there are small towns. Acadia, Florida has a lot of southern people. That said, the large cities/metros are only minimally southern below Ocala. That said, Tampa and the Lakeland-Winter Haven area do have relatively high numbers of "Southerners" for central Florida, but still a minority of the population. The Fort Myers/Cape Coral area of southwest Florida also has a respectable percentage, but again a minority.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 01:57 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,423 posts, read 18,320,690 times
Reputation: 11902
I think the DFW metroplex is a good benchmark, Fort Worth being the gateway to the West but still Southern. Likewise San Antonio plays a fairly similar role but with more Mexican influence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 08:44 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,132,535 times
Reputation: 10910
Westernmost - easily Bakersfield. Some would even argue Santa Maria or Coalinga.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,522,962 times
Reputation: 737
Westernmost - Fort Worth. There is no way anything in NM or far west TX is Southern in many categories.

Southernmost - I second Corpus Christi.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 11:02 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,578,675 times
Reputation: 1266
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
Westernmost - Fort Worth. There is no way anything in NM or far west TX is Southern in many categories.

Southernmost - I second Corpus Christi.
As far as western-most, you really need to travel to Texas. The accents, regional cuisine, religions, and general mindset are similar to what you'll find in the southeast. Abilene is southern and it is west of Fort Worth. Midland and Odessa are southern, as is Lubbock. You can even find southern accents in southeastern New Mexico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2011, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,522,962 times
Reputation: 737
I have... But I don't see it. Even if everything is the same, the lack of forest cover breaks it and I can't see it being part of "The South" just because of that landscape characteristic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 06:05 PM
 
Location: NorCal by way of L.A. and Atlanta
96 posts, read 102,922 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
Westernmost - easily Bakersfield. Some would even argue Santa Maria or Coalinga.
Agreed! Bakersfield is about as southern as Tennessee and Arkansas plus most of the people who migrated to Bakersfield were originally from Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 03:20 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,110,365 times
Reputation: 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
Westernmost - Fort Worth. There is no way anything in NM or far west TX is Southern in many categories.

Southernmost - I second Corpus Christi.
As to the bolded part, what are you defining as "far west Texas", and what are the catagories which you feel are essential to being "Southern"?

With all due respect, I believe you are simply making "Southern" and "Southeastern" into synonymous terms, and they are not. The South has never been a monolithic region, but a part of the country with a shared history, culture, linguistic, religious, etc, patterns, that easily offset it from the Far West, Midwest, or Northeast.

There are "many" catagories where eastern Tennessee does not fit in with southern Mississippi, nor south Louisiana with about any place else. This notion that the South is the mirror of GWTW is a Hollywood creation, as is that --- singularly speaking -- Texas is full of desert and cactus and looks exactly like Arizona (where most of those old western movies were filmed because it saved on set-costs).

As it is, I would agree that trans-pecos Texas is truly Southwestern...but even El Paso has a Confederate monument and went for secession in 1861. At most, most of western Texas is simply the South moved into a more western-type environment. The settlers however, were overwhelmingly Southerners moving to get a new start and they brought with them all the above mentioned characteristics and attitudes.

When it comes right down to it, Texas has very little in common with the true SW states of New Mexico and Arizona (or any bordering them). They didn't even become states until long after Texas had been shaped and settled by Southern forces. No way did they influence Texas.

Last edited by TexasReb; 12-11-2013 at 03:33 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top