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View Poll Results: Why do some people view the south as rural and the northeast as urban
Ignorance-They haven't traveled or studied enough to know otherwise. Plus, the media feeds them this belief. 35 71.43%
They've traveled enough, but they allow their prejudices to cloud reality. The media reinforces their prejudice. 14 28.57%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-23-2012, 02:58 PM
 
958 posts, read 924,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Though PA has one one of the largest rural population in the US actually

It isnt an either or for either place. The biggest difference is the spread, thew cities in the NE are much closer than the South; making the urban feel more developed in the grand scheme. Both (NE and South) as a percentage are dominated by rural developed areas though
That's only because our rural areas are very populated.

There are cities and other urban, formerly industrial boroughs, townships, etc all over PA. It's pretty insulting to those places to say it's largely dominated by rural areas. Really only the T is mostly rural.
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,092 posts, read 5,966,711 times
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Hmm, well there is ignorance for certain

A wish of some from the NE to keep the south "in it's place"

And then those who need desperately to feel better than someone-anyone at all.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
This is what has perplexed me. Perhaps people are simply not well traveled or educated, and so they only spout what the media or popular culture tells them. However, how can anyone realistically call the South "rural" these days, as though it's vastly different from the other regions?

The South has the largest population of the four primary regions of the U.S. (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West). It has a greater population density than the midwest and west.

The Northeast is very rural outside of the Boston-Washington D.C. megalopolis, particularly northern New England (Maine, N. NH, VT), as well as much of upstate New York and Central Pennsylvania.

Yet, for some reason, people, albeit the news media or people on this site, often refer to the northeast as an urban region and the south as a rural region, even when the South has four metro areas with over five million people (Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, and Miami), three with close to two million and between five million (Orlando, Tampa-St. Petersburg, and Charlotte), and many more with over one million each (Raleigh-Durham, Greensboro-Winston Salem, Richmond, Norfolk-Va. Beach, Louisville, Nashville, Memphis, Greenville-Spartanburg, Birmingham, Jacksonville, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Austin, and San Antonio). There are also many others with between 500,000-1 million, such as Knoxville, Charleston, Columbia, Augusta, Lakeland-Winter Haven, Tulsa, Baton Rouge, Shreveport, and Mobile).

From what I've read, many northeasterners when heading to Florida often like to say, the south is rural, when they simply take I-95. Do they not realize that I-95 through the Carolinas is through the least populated areas of the state? Even Coastal Georgia isn't very populated compared to the Piedmont areas. It's like saying, the northeast is a rural region because I drove through I-81, and it was nothing but mountains and farms. Yet, the southeast is all urban because I drove through on I-85 and saw all the cities of Durham, Greensboro, Charlotte, Greenville, and Atlanta).

So why do they do this?
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Old 02-23-2012, 05:18 PM
 
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The Northeast is certainly denser than the South.

Ive lived in both places, and the NE IS more urban. For sure there are rural areas in the NE, and urban areas in the south, but the south is more rural.

Parts of the west are even more rural and less urban than the south.
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Old 02-23-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Location: NC
1,182 posts, read 2,224,015 times
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Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, New York State (OUTSIDE OF NYC), PA (OUTSIDE OF Philadelphia and Pittsburgh), doesn't seem that dense to me.....
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Old 02-23-2012, 05:47 PM
 
2,447 posts, read 2,684,306 times
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Some places are urban and some are rural. This is everywhere and nothing new. If anyone actually believe this, just ignore them.
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Old 02-23-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: NC
1,182 posts, read 2,224,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Because it is, South Carolina has roughly the Sam population as Conn.
Or NC has a similar population to NJ
SC has Conn beat by over 1 million people....But I do see your point...
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Old 02-23-2012, 08:03 PM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,070,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
That's only because our rural areas are very populated.

There are cities and other urban, formerly industrial boroughs, townships, etc all over PA. It's pretty insulting to those places to say it's largely dominated by rural areas. Really only the T is mostly rural.
Is calling a place "rural" an insult? Urban, suburban, rural, they are just classifications of populations or land areas. Why would any of them be an insult? Many people PREFER rural areas (not me tho). But do you think they feel insulted when others describe their homes as rural?
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Old 02-23-2012, 08:47 PM
 
74 posts, read 186,874 times
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The northeast is rural, Midwest is rural, west is rural, south is rural. Every state is rural. Where yall think all of the food production comes from? The big cities? No it comes from Elmer Fudd looking dudes who wear straw hats and greasy suspenders and spend all day sitting on the porch in a rocking chair with a shotgun in his hand and a pet bloodhound sitting next to him. He is ready to shoot whoever steps on his acres. He chews on wheat stocks, has a scarecrow in his yard, and his breath has the aroma of fresh milk that he drunk straight from the cow's vagina. This guy American life outside the city, where the vast majority of states are rural lands.

Atleast that's how me and people here in Chicago generally picture people from rural southern Illinois. But anyway, EVERY state is rural and every state has a city-rural dichotomy. Every city sees it's rural neighbors as "weirdos".
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Old 02-23-2012, 11:43 PM
 
958 posts, read 924,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofaque86 View Post
Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, New York State (OUTSIDE OF NYC), PA (OUTSIDE OF Philadelphia and Pittsburgh), doesn't seem that dense to me.....
Not really. There's plenty of urban, dense places in PA outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Is calling a place "rural" an insult? Urban, suburban, rural, they are just classifications of populations or land areas. Why would any of them be an insult? Many people PREFER rural areas (not me tho). But do you think they feel insulted when others describe their homes as rural?
You're not referring to your home; you're referring to somebody else's.

Calling a city or other urban area rural is in fact an insult. You're taking away somebody's right to that identity and discrediting their personal experiences and upbringing if they grew up there. A place that sprung up around industry and is mainly working class and has an older, urban downtown is in fact not rural. A place full of rowhouses or smaller, working class houses near whatever industry it came up around is in fact not rural.

Those classifications have definitions, and I see people use those classifications incorrectly pretty often.
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
786 posts, read 1,605,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago'sFinest View Post
The northeast is rural, Midwest is rural, west is rural, south is rural. Every state is rural. Where yall think all of the food production comes from? The big cities? No it comes from Elmer Fudd looking dudes who wear straw hats and greasy suspenders and spend all day sitting on the porch in a rocking chair with a shotgun in his hand and a pet bloodhound sitting next to him. He is ready to shoot whoever steps on his acres. He chews on wheat stocks, has a scarecrow in his yard, and his breath has the aroma of fresh milk that he drunk straight from the cow's vagina. This guy American life outside the city, where the vast majority of states are rural lands.

Atleast that's how me and people here in Chicago generally picture people from rural southern Illinois. But anyway, EVERY state is rural and every state has a city-rural dichotomy. Every city sees it's rural neighbors as "weirdos".
Obviously that whole thing is an hilarious joke about how you see rural folks, but I can't believe you actually think that's where milk comes from. Having said that though, I can't see how you getting that wrong is part of the joke, so do you think that?
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