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View Poll Results: Why do some people view the south as rural and the northeast as urban
Ignorance-They haven't traveled or studied enough to know otherwise. Plus, the media feeds them this belief. 35 71.43%
They've traveled enough, but they allow their prejudices to cloud reality. The media reinforces their prejudice. 14 28.57%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-25-2012, 06:12 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 630,683 times
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Very few Southern or Northeastern counties are as sparsely populated as the Plains or areas of the West. So to me, the South and Northeast are not that rural.
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Old 02-25-2012, 06:33 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,397,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCentralNEGuy View Post
Very few Southern or Northeastern counties are as sparsely populated as the Plains or areas of the West. So to me, the South and Northeast are not that rural.
My understanding is that the empty areas of the west are not known as rural, but frontier. In frontier you might have one city than emptiness.

Rural is more there are always people around, but the population density is incredibly low.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,778,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
My understanding is that the empty areas of the west are not known as rural, but frontier. In frontier you might have one city than emptiness.

Rural is more there are always people around, but the population density is incredibly low.
That's not rural. That's urban/suburban.
The difference is the terrain.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:05 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,397,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
That's not rural. That's urban/suburban.
The difference is the terrain.
Suburban is denser than rural.

Suburban is still urban, just low density.

Rural is NOT urban.

Exurban is a cross between rural and suburban.

That is how I always looked at it.

Take a look.

Frontier is less dense than rural.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,778,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Suburban is denser than rural.

Suburban is still urban, just low density.

Rural is NOT urban.

Exurban is a cross between rural and suburban.

That is how I always looked at it.

Take a look.

Frontier is less dense than rural.
You can have one city in a county with 50,000 (frontier) or have 5 towns with around 10,000 people (rural), in the end, the density is the same.
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Old 02-25-2012, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,322,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
Not really. There's plenty of urban, dense places in PA outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

You're not referring to your home; you're referring to somebody else's.

Calling a city or other urban area rural is in fact an insult. You're taking away somebody's right to that identity and discrediting their personal experiences and upbringing if they grew up there. A place that sprung up around industry and is mainly working class and has an older, urban downtown is in fact not rural. A place full of rowhouses or smaller, working class houses near whatever industry it came up around is in fact not rural.

Those classifications have definitions, and I see people use those classifications incorrectly pretty often.
If I called MN urban just because Minneapolis and St. Paul were in it, I'd deserve the ridicule that was to follow.....as does anyone.
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:24 AM
 
958 posts, read 923,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Suburban is denser than rural.

Suburban is still urban, just low density.

Rural is NOT urban.

Exurban is a cross between rural and suburban.

That is how I always looked at it.

Take a look.

Frontier is less dense than rural.
Suburban can't be urban. A suburban place is one that was built away from the city, to get away from it.

The rest is correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
If I called MN urban just because Minneapolis and St. Paul were in it, I'd deserve the ridicule that was to follow.....as does anyone.
There's a reason people don't view Minnesota as being as urban as the East Coast.

I also never said Pennsylvania was urban. The person I was responding to said that PA was rural outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, which is incorrect. Also, ridicule from who exactly? Who do I have to answer to exactly when it comes to this? You? I don't think so.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:52 AM
 
9,984 posts, read 6,769,476 times
Reputation: 5613
Guys it's just the proximity of the large population centers in
the Northeast. They are within light hours drive of each other.
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Old 02-26-2012, 11:39 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,058,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
If I called MN urban just because Minneapolis and St. Paul were in it, I'd deserve the ridicule that was to follow.....as does anyone.
You sure? Well over 50% of MN's residents live in the Mpls/St Paul Metro area. Or is your definition of rural simply based on land area? If yes, I'd agree, MOST of MN's land area is away from from urban areas. But then, so is TX's, CA's, IL's, MA's, OH's, etc, etc. Are those rural states, too?
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Old 02-26-2012, 11:58 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,058,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Suburban is denser than rural.


Frontier is less dense than rural.
You've drawn an important distinction here. "Frontier" is an area that is not just low, sparse population, but also far from population centers. Here's some data from the National Center for Frontier Communities. (I tried to post a link to their website, but don't know how.)

Top Ten Frontier States by Population
Largest Frontier Population
1. Texas
2. Arizona
3. New Mexico
4. Minnesota
5. California
6. Montana
7. Colorado
8. Oklahoma
9. Washington
10. Wyoming

The site also points out that "Frontier land is more highly concentrated than frontier population. For example in terms of area, the top ten states account for 73% of all frontier land." In the list above, notice how 6 of the 10 states actually have large metropolitan areas within their boundaries.

But back to the OP, while there are no high-frontier states in the South with the exception of TX, the South does have a huge rural population, and until the past few decades, a solid rural heritage. That's why many Americans view the South as a rural. And conversely, despite the large amounts of rural land in the Northeast, many view the NE as urban because the country's largest and oldest cities are there. It's all about perception.
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