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View Poll Results: Why do some people view the south as rural and the northeast as urban
Ignorance-They haven't traveled or studied enough to know otherwise. Plus, the media feeds them this belief. 35 71.43%
They've traveled enough, but they allow their prejudices to cloud reality. The media reinforces their prejudice. 14 28.57%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-20-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,664,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Suburban =/= Rural

lower density =/= Rural.

Rural = Rural
Pretty much.

There's really no excuses for that type of ignorance. Rural and suburban don't go hand in hand.
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Old 12-20-2011, 08:58 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Georgia is only 30 percent rural. I guess some do not know what rural is.



Other interesting facts.

The state with the lowest percentage rural residents is

California less than 6%
West Virginia is another one with a high Rural population
I'm guessing you are using % of population living in an MSA as a measure. That's one way to do it, but the OP is asking about perception. MSAs are defined by county lines and often include large swaths of rural, lightly populated land. For example, much of the San Diego MSA is desert or undeveloped forest. The Duluth MSA in MN includes much of the Boundary Waters Canoe area, a vast roadless area comprised of pristine forests and lakes, but no human settlement. I'd wager anyone who found themselves in either of those areas would not think they were in an "urban" area. To me, it's what the area looks like that leads me to perceive it as urban, suburban or rural. I believe the NE has many more areas that look urban than the South does, MSAs notwithstanding.
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Old 12-20-2011, 09:52 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,148,120 times
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All of the states within The South have majority urban populations, so anyone saying The South is rural isn't basing that statement in truth.

I do remember reading that South Carolina is the "least" urban of America, though. It gave a figure of 60% urban residents if I remember correctly.
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Old 12-20-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 14,306,789 times
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If hicks live spread out in the country, or gather in large groups (cities), what's the difference.
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Old 12-20-2011, 10:36 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,253,307 times
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In Pennsylvania, even the medium sized cities (Harrisburg, Lancaster, Reading, York) are dense. However, the boundaries for those cities have remained the same for decades. Annexation of surrounding suburban and rural areas into cities is virtually unheard of in Pennsylvania. However, some of the townships that surround the cities can be rather spread out.

What's interesting about West Virginia is that under the old definition, the state was 36.1% rural in 1990. Under the new definition, it was 46.9% urban, then 46.1% urban in 2000. (I saw a chart earlier in the discussion. Post # 34.) West Virginia has a lot of unincorporated dense neighborhoods outside of the city limits so I guess the new urban definition took that into account. It's hard to annex populated areas in West Virginia and most of the annexed areas are industrial parks and shopping centers, or other things related to industry and commerce.

Last edited by tallydude02; 12-20-2011 at 10:44 PM..
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Old 12-21-2011, 10:39 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,577,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
In Pennsylvania, even the medium sized cities (Harrisburg, Lancaster, Reading, York) are dense. However, the boundaries for those cities have remained the same for decades. Annexation of surrounding suburban and rural areas into cities is virtually unheard of in Pennsylvania. However, some of the townships that surround the cities can be rather spread out.

What's interesting about West Virginia is that under the old definition, the state was 36.1% rural in 1990. Under the new definition, it was 46.9% urban, then 46.1% urban in 2000. (I saw a chart earlier in the discussion. Post # 34.) West Virginia has a lot of unincorporated dense neighborhoods outside of the city limits so I guess the new urban definition took that into account. It's hard to annex populated areas in West Virginia and most of the annexed areas are industrial parks and shopping centers, or other things related to industry and commerce.
I've been in Harrisburg, and it didn't look any denser than what you'd find in southern cities.
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Coastal Northeast
16,728 posts, read 23,147,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Neither of the two poll choices. It may be because the 7 densest states (and 8 of the Top 10) are in the NE based on the 2010 US census while only 1 of the Top 10 (No. 8 Florida) is in the south:

1. New Jersey: 1196 people/sq mi
2. Rhode Island: 1018
3. Massachusetts: 839
4. Connecticut: 738
5. Maryland: 595
6. Delaware: 461
7. New York: 411
8. Florida: 351
9. Pennsylvania: 284
10. Ohio: 282
This.

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
All of the states within The South have majority urban populations, so anyone saying The South is rural isn't basing that statement in truth.
The southern STATES are rural; that says nothing about the people.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:36 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,577,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidyankee764 View Post
This.



The southern STATES are rural; that says nothing about the people.
The southern states are rural? Really?

So Florida is rural but Wisconsin is not?

So Georgia is rural, but Minnesota is not?

So North Carolina is rural, but Michigan is not?

So Texas is rural, but Maine is not?

So Tennessee is rural, but Vermont is not?

So Virginia is rural, but Indiana is not?

So Louisiana is rural, but Iowa is not?

So Georgia is rural, but Pennslvania is not?


What about the west that has so much uninhabited land?

What about much of the western midwest that is far more rural than the South, and the rest of the midwest, outside a few areas, which is typical of the South?

What about upper New England.

When it comes down to it, it seems like you're saying that the South is rural because it doesn't match up to the northeast Megalopolis, but couldn't you say the same for the rest of the country, including non-megalopolis northeast? It's also a bit of a crazy comparison. The megalopolis is a very small area. It's like taking the Piedmont Atlantic area of the South and using it as a measuring stick against the midwest, claiming that most of the midwest is rural, despite the fact that it has numerous populated areas.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:37 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,636 posts, read 74,577,828 times
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bek farming for a long time was the only industry in the south.
also bek the south was so crushed economically thru reconstruction it took 100 years to develop anything but farming.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:40 AM
 
Location: under a rock
1,494 posts, read 1,450,519 times
Reputation: 1019
My question is: what's so wrong with rural?
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