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Old 12-21-2011, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,187,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
How would they be in the city of Sacramento but also be in unincorporated areas?
The Same way that Houston has 1.5M people in unincorporated areas.

It is their ETJ. and theirs to swallow or release.

Which is sticky because in both case the ETJ pop is close to the city pop
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:48 PM
 
704 posts, read 1,504,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Though right now, Denver has a population of 600,000, 4 pro sports teams(5 if you count MLS), the Colorado State Capitol, and the majority of the cultural institutions in the metro area including museums, performing arts venues, and nightlife.

Aurora has a population of 325,000 and an Air Force base... Seems like it stil has a way to go.
And some of those cultural institutions and economic drivers are moving to Aurora. And, frankly, I'll take an Air Force base over a nightclub every time. And so would most people in the area, which is why Aurora is growing and thriving while Denver is not (or, perhaps, is not to the extent that Aurora is).
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:29 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,628,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNative View Post
And some of those cultural institutions and economic drivers are moving to Aurora. And, frankly, I'll take an Air Force base over a nightclub every time. And so would most people in the area, which is why Aurora is growing and thriving while Denver is not (or, perhaps, is not to the extent that Aurora is).
Okay, Aurora still has to practically double it's population to pass Denver though. Sure Aurora has room to grow, but what sort of cultural attractions are moving to Aurora specifically? It just looks like typical suburban sprawl every time I've driven through it. Sure an Air Force base is good for the economy--but there's tons of places with military bases that aren't that attracting. Denver's economy is still pretty strong, I think you're overstating the importance of Aurora. I'm sure Aurora is growing but you'll have to provide more examples of how it's going to surpass Denver.
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,418 posts, read 10,082,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Okay, Aurora still has to practically double it's population to pass Denver though. Sure Aurora has room to grow, but what sort of cultural attractions are moving to Aurora specifically? It just looks like typical suburban sprawl every time I've driven through it. Sure an Air Force base is good for the economy--but there's tons of places with military bases that aren't that attracting. Denver's economy is still pretty strong, I think you're overstating the importance of Aurora. I'm sure Aurora is growing but you'll have to provide more examples of how it's going to surpass Denver.
To throw a perspective into this debate from a total outsider. There are suburbs that one hears about from outside the region for one reason or another, a ball park, amusement attraction or something else that might make one recognize the name. Tempe, AZ for example, site of the Fiesta Bowl.

Having spent most of my life in the South, but having made about 4 visits to Colorado, I must say I never hear anything about Aurora that would make it distinctive to me. Just another suburb of Denver. I am sure it is a nice suburb, but I couldn't tell you anything that would elevate it above Lakewood or Arvada or Golden or any other Denver suburb I can think of.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,782,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
The Same way that Houston has 1.5M people in unincorporated areas.

It is their ETJ. and theirs to swallow or release.

Which is sticky because in both case the ETJ pop is close to the city pop
It's not a part of the city is my point.
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:32 PM
 
52 posts, read 42,777 times
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Saint Paul used to be larger than Minneapolis, which surpassed it in the 1890 census.

Also, although both are in the Los Angeles metro, West Covina has far more people than Covina itself.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:58 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,157,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacramento916 View Post
Sac has a pop of about 490,000. The most populous suburb is Elk Grove with 160,000. Not even close. Though the unincorporated areas of Sacramento city is probably about 300,000 or so.
I interpreted the question to mean the sum of multiple suburbs not just one.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Old Hyde Park, Kansas City,MO
1,145 posts, read 2,079,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
I interpreted the question to mean the sum of multiple suburbs not just one.
That would be every large city in the United States expect for maybe San Antonio
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:59 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,819,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustAnother View Post
Saint Paul used to be larger than Minneapolis, which surpassed it in the 1890 census.

Also, although both are in the Los Angeles metro, West Covina has far more people than Covina itself.
Similarly, West Palm Beach has more people than Palm Beach….but, it's all still in the Miami Metro. That said, Miami is geographically tiny with less than 36 square miles of land. It's conceivable but not probable that another municipality in the metro could pass it one day.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:07 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,819,735 times
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Large suburbs are unlikely to pass their metros' core cities because their land use patterns would typically require too much land pass the population of their more densely populated central city. Even when core cities in the sunbelt run out of land, they are turning their growth inward while suburbs typically expand outward at a lower density rate.
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