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Old 12-21-2011, 11:52 AM
 
51 posts, read 58,741 times
Reputation: 35

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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
The UK itself defines Scotland as a country.

You originally counted Irish along with the British in your opening post, before you are corrected.

I am trying to correct you once again, but you aren't listening.

The Welsh are even gaining more power, this year in fact.

Wales votes 'yes' to more devolved powers - Telegraph

"
Deputy First Minister Ieuan Wyn Jones, AM for Ynys Mon, said: "Let's be proud that the nation has spoken with one voice.
"The rest of the world can sit up and take notice of a small country that has emerged determined to secure its identity.
"Wales is a nation capable of making its own decisions."
Welsh Conservative leader Nick Bourne, whose party is the main opposition in the Senedd, said Wales had now been given the tools to do the job."


Scotland and N. Ireland still have greater powers.



Again you should probably do some research on how the UK actually works, and see how THEY define it, instead of taking in your delusional definition of such.

Wales, Scotland and N. Ireland are all countries AND nations, they just are sovereign under the UK... This is MUCH different than how the U.S. Federal system works, and why, as many posters have continuously tried to get through to you, they shouldn't be grouped together. N. Ireland is NOT like Wisconsin lol...
But the UK is still a country, thats a fact. It's a sovereign state just like Germany or any other country. If the UK is not a country then what is it? And if the UK is not a country, then Germany(or any other country) isn't either.

Lets say Scotland is a country then, so what? The UK is still a country aswell.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:00 PM
 
2,816 posts, read 5,388,989 times
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I would say nearly 100% of those who consider themselves as having "American" ethnicity on the census poll have at least partial British parentage, so the OP is partially right.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:15 PM
 
51 posts, read 58,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Now if you want to CONTINUE to create your own definition of "British-American", please do so...you have that right. Nobody is going to take any of your posts seriously though.
Anybody from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales or England is British per defenition.

Therefore anybody with ancestry from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales or England is British-American.

If that's wrong, How would you define it?

You have turned this thread into something else. I "grouped" the Irish with the British simply because I wanted to, not because I was unaware of the fact that Ireland is it's separate country.

I wanted to know how and why the number of British Americans have been downplayed, 61 million in 1980. Now just 40 million.

I wanted to see if like I suspected theres an anti British and anti Irish sentiment in the US. Or atleast anti British in that they don't want to aknowledge the true number of them and promote German Americans as being a larger group when thats not really true.

I never intended to even discuss if Scotland is it's own country or not, At this point I couldn't care less. But that seems to be what you have gotten hanged up on and meanwhile ignoring the subject of this thread.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,469,138 times
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Is the "American" category for white people who don't know their European roots?
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
2,243 posts, read 3,463,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Is the "American" category for white people who don't know their European roots?
Yes. You see it a lot in the South.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
2,243 posts, read 3,463,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by defoe View Post
Anybody from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales or England is British per defenition.

Therefore anybody with ancestry from Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales or England is British-American.

If that's wrong, How would you define it?

You have turned this thread into something else. I "grouped" the Irish with the British simply because I wanted to, not because I was unaware of the fact that Ireland is it's separate country.

I wanted to know how and why the number of British Americans have been downplayed, 61 million in 1980. Now just 40 million.

I wanted to see if like I suspected theres an anti British and anti Irish sentiment in the US. Or atleast anti British in that they don't want to aknowledge the true number of them and promote German Americans as being a larger group when thats not really true.

I never intended to even discuss if Scotland is it's own country or not, At this point I couldn't care less. But that seems to be what you have gotten hanged up on and meanwhile ignoring the subject of this thread.
You mean, how DO we define it? English, Scottish, Scotch-Irish, and Welsh. We've said that many times.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:24 PM
 
51 posts, read 58,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
I would say nearly 100% of those who consider themselves as having "American" ethnicity on the census poll have at least partial British parentage, so the OP is partially right.
Exactly

I get the feeling that most people want to ignore that fact because that makes British-Americans a larger group than German-Americans.

And I'm aware they are only partially British... But then the German-Americans are also only partially German.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:26 PM
 
51 posts, read 58,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
You mean, how DO we define it? English, Scottish, Scotch-Irish, and Welsh. We've said that many times.
And what I said is still factually correct, since a Scotsman is British per defention and a Scottish-American is still also British-American per defenition.
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,469,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
Yes. You see it a lot in the South.
Maybe it is a Southern thing because for me personally I've never meet a White American who didn't knew their European roots .
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:55 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,573,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by defoe View Post
But the UK is still a country, thats a fact. It's a sovereign state just like Germany or any other country. If the UK is not a country then what is it? And if the UK is not a country, then Germany(or any other country) isn't either.

Lets say Scotland is a country then, so what? The UK is still a country aswell.
Nobody is arguing this with you. But claiming them as British-American as an ethnic group just b/c they are from the UK, or British Isles, is not the same.

To do what you were doing with German ancestry and split it up as you say... Well you could do the same with Ireland by county... County Cork is different than County Galway and different from County Dublin, and they have their own traditions....but also a common ancestry which is NOT British...same goes for the Scottish and N. Ireland, probably less so for the Welsh...but still there, certainly.

Just because the U.S. is relatively massive and more of a homogenous melting pot doesn't mean Europe is. The people there were in relatively small places of land, about the size of Rhode Island in some cases for a millenia. People did not traditionally travel like they used to, therefore unique cultures and ethnic groups were able to form in fairly small pockets. The U.S. was still largely uninhabited except for Native Americans during the great bulk of European History.

Last edited by grapico; 12-21-2011 at 01:04 PM..
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