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View Poll Results: Would you like to move to a new state?
Yes! 9 24.32%
Yes, within 5 years 5 13.51%
Yes, after 5 years from now 3 8.11%
No 20 54.05%
Other 0 0%
Voters: 37. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-22-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
And why cant the midwest and northeast stop losing people (from domestic migration)?
Because migration patterns are a lagging indicator. There could still be lots of people in the Northeast and Midwest who think that the South and West are economic paradises, because dammit, it's been that way for 30 years, so how could it possibly change so abruptly?

Yeah, I know there are places in the South (Louisiana) and West (Colorado) that are doing well, and places in the Northeast (Rhode Island) and Midwest (Michigan) that aren't, but overall, the Northeast and Midwest have proven much more economically resilient than the South or West in the last five years.
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Old 12-23-2011, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,427,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Because migration patterns are a lagging indicator. There could still be lots of people in the Northeast and Midwest who think that the South and West are economic paradises, because dammit, it's been that way for 30 years, so how could it possibly change so abruptly?

Yeah, I know there are places in the South (Louisiana) and West (Colorado) that are doing well, and places in the Northeast (Rhode Island) and Midwest (Michigan) that aren't, but overall, the Northeast and Midwest have proven much more economically resilient than the South or West in the last five years.
then why do natives keep leaving the area in droves?
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Old 12-23-2011, 08:09 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
Reputation: 14655
Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
then why do natives keep leaving the area in droves?
Part of it, as I just illustrated, is the perception that the economy in the South and West is still better than it is in the Northeast or Midwest, even though that largely hasn't been true in the last five years. Education is a factor as well. For better or worse, there's an attrition happening in the Northeast and Midwest, wherein people with limited job skills have no opportunities, so they leave to find work that suits them in the South and West.

There's also the marketing angle. Cities like Orlando and Las Vegas have grown precisely because they've billed themselves as American paradises. But then once people move there, they realize that they cant go to Disney World, the beach or the casino every day, and even if they do it every weekend, eventually it gets old anyway. Then they're stuck with the mall, and that gets old too, especially if you're deep in debt like so many people in the Sun Belt are.

Then there's the weather factor. Some people would rather sweat their asses off from May through September and lose everything they have in a hurricane or a tornado than they would wear a coat and gloves from November through March and shovel the snow out of their driveways, I guess. Then again, if you lose all your **** in a natural disaster, then you can either hit the jackpot at the casino or get hired at the strip club, and then you can buy new stuff in no time.
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Old 12-23-2011, 08:43 AM
 
10,553 posts, read 13,111,831 times
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I think the vast majority of the migration from the NE and Midwest are people retiring to warm climes.
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Old 12-23-2011, 08:52 AM
 
816 posts, read 1,586,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Part of it, as I just illustrated, is the perception that the economy in the South and West is still better than it is in the Northeast or Midwest, even though that largely hasn't been true in the last five years. Education is a factor as well. For better or worse, there's an attrition happening in the Northeast and Midwest, wherein people with limited job skills have no opportunities, so they leave to find work that suits them in the South and West.

There's also the marketing angle. Cities like Orlando and Las Vegas have grown precisely because they've billed themselves as American paradises. But then once people move there, they realize that they cant go to Disney World, the beach or the casino every day, and even if they do it every weekend, eventually it gets old anyway. Then they're stuck with the mall, and that gets old too, especially if you're deep in debt like so many people in the Sun Belt are.

Then there's the weather factor. Some people would rather sweat their asses off from May through September and lose everything they have in a hurricane or a tornado than they would wear a coat and gloves from November through March and shovel the snow out of their driveways, I guess. Then again, if you lose all your **** in a natural disaster, then you can either hit the jackpot at the casino or get hired at the strip club, and then you can buy new stuff in no time.
Ahem...

NOAA

You sound bitter. Athens GA may be small time and in the Deep South but the rest of the cities aren't...There is a big diff in moving to Houston/Dallas/Atlanta/Austin/Charlotte/Raleigh which are loaded with F500 companies and high paying jobs than deep south Athens.
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Old 12-23-2011, 09:42 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
Reputation: 14655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Ahem...

NOAA

You sound bitter. Athens GA may be small time and in the Deep South but the rest of the cities aren't...There is a big diff in moving to Houston/Dallas/Atlanta/Austin/Charlotte/Raleigh which are loaded with F500 companies and high paying jobs than deep south Athens.
Nice map. Here's another one illustrating the frequency of killer tornadoes between 1950 and 2004:



And you know which state has had the most tornadoes in 2011? Alabama, in the heart of Dixie Alley.

Here was the National Weather Service's convective outlook for April 27, 2011:



Most tornadoes in one day in U.S. history. Deadliest tornado outbreak since 1936. (That one was also in the South.) Just because the Great Plains are the most notorious region for tornadoes doesn't mean that the South doesn't get any.

As for your comments about Athens, clearly you've never been here or you'd realize that it's a college town, and is often considered to be a classic example of such in the United States. It's not far from Atlanta either.
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:04 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,798,386 times
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I can see myself in New York, within the next five years. I would most likely return to Texas, though.
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Old 12-23-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,235 posts, read 19,531,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
then why do natives keep leaving the area in droves?
Isn't there some kind of physical principle which states that movement usually happens in a direction away from more dense areas and towards less dense areas?

Anyway, the fact is that the population of the northeast and midwest continues to increase in spite of some people moving away from these regions. If you visit these states, then you would hardly think that people have left or are leaving.

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 12-23-2011 at 12:24 PM..
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Old 12-23-2011, 01:05 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,578,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Isn't there some kind of physical principle which states that movement usually happens in a direction away from more dense areas and towards less dense areas?
What do you know, it's the scientific principle of diffusion.
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