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Old 01-25-2012, 10:49 AM
 
Location: IN
20,864 posts, read 36,004,584 times
Reputation: 13310

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In corporate suburban US and job rich urban centres the decline never happened at all.
In most other parts of the US the decline began in the 1960s and has accelerated more or less ever since.
Sure, a few brighter spots in parts of the 80s and 90s, but that hasn't mitigated the decline in many places.
Income stagnation and the rise of the cost of most services from healthcare, education, medicine, energy, food, etc has left many areas making no gains or sliding backward.
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Old 01-25-2012, 12:19 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 20 days ago)
 
48,284 posts, read 45,576,705 times
Reputation: 15366
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
In corporate suburban US and job rich urban centres the decline never happened at all.
In most other parts of the US the decline began in the 1960s and has accelerated more or less ever since.
Sure, a few brighter spots in parts of the 80s and 90s, but that hasn't mitigated the decline in many places.
Income stagnation and the rise of the cost of most services from healthcare, education, medicine, energy, food, etc has left many areas making no gains or sliding backward.
I won't lie. For a long time, I never new the decline was visible to me, until I started reading about it in places like the Rust Belt. I never felt it until the last few years. My father graduated from college in the Carter administration, and got his masters during the early part of the Reagan administration. I was born in 1986. I was raised in a middle class home. My father comes from a working class home where his father worked in a factory. I was sheltered from the decline that my father's hometown went through because for the most part, I never saw it for myself. I wasn't raised there. I was always in a suburban or semi-rural area. I wasn't seeing decline around me or even knew what decline was. It was when I started reading about Pittsburgh as a teenager when I started to learn about this stuff. I learned that some northern cities had declined via reading about it. I had no idea how bad it was until I saw pictures.

In my family, layoffs were felt, but my father always bounced back. However, as the years pass by, it seems like things are looking bleaker. I think about myself now and my father at age 25. He had more at age 25 than I do now. Some of my friends graduated from college and found themselves stuck in low wage jobs because they can't get good jobs. We're all waiting for that 5th Kondratiev wave to come, for something new to come.
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,242,890 times
Reputation: 1430
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I won't lie. For a long time, I never new the decline was visible to me, until I started reading about it in places like the Rust Belt. I never felt it until the last few years. My father graduated from college in the Carter administration, and got his masters during the early part of the Reagan administration. I was born in 1986. I was raised in a middle class home. My father comes from a working class home where his father worked in a factory. I was sheltered from the decline that my father's hometown went through because for the most part, I never saw it for myself. I wasn't raised there. I was always in a suburban or semi-rural area. I wasn't seeing decline around me or even knew what decline was. It was when I started reading about Pittsburgh as a teenager when I started to learn about this stuff. I learned that some northern cities had declined via reading about it. I had no idea how bad it was until I saw pictures.

In my family, layoffs were felt, but my father always bounced back. However, as the years pass by, it seems like things are looking bleaker. I think about myself now and my father at age 25. He had more at age 25 than I do now. Some of my friends graduated from college and found themselves stuck in low wage jobs because they can't get good jobs. We're all waiting for that 5th Kondratiev wave to come, for something new to come.
Forgive me if I sound a little snarky, but did he have internet access?
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Old 01-25-2012, 07:55 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 20 days ago)
 
48,284 posts, read 45,576,705 times
Reputation: 15366
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Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
Forgive me if I sound a little snarky, but did he have internet access?
No, but if the internet existed back then the way it does today, he would definitely have it. He had a very nice car. He bought it off of the lot. I can't afford a car by myself. And with the gas prices the way they are, it doesn't matter. My father had an easier time getting a job at age 25 than I do now, and I have a job.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:00 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,179,345 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I won't lie. For a long time, I never new the decline was visible to me, until I started reading about it in places like the Rust Belt. I never felt it until the last few years. My father graduated from college in the Carter administration, and got his masters during the early part of the Reagan administration. I was born in 1986. I was raised in a middle class home. My father comes from a working class home where his father worked in a factory. I was sheltered from the decline that my father's hometown went through because for the most part, I never saw it for myself. I wasn't raised there. I was always in a suburban or semi-rural area. I wasn't seeing decline around me or even knew what decline was. It was when I started reading about Pittsburgh as a teenager when I started to learn about this stuff. I learned that some northern cities had declined via reading about it. I had no idea how bad it was until I saw pictures.

In my family, layoffs were felt, but my father always bounced back. However, as the years pass by, it seems like things are looking bleaker. I think about myself now and my father at age 25. He had more at age 25 than I do now. Some of my friends graduated from college and found themselves stuck in low wage jobs because they can't get good jobs. We're all waiting for that 5th Kondratiev wave to come, for something new to come.
I know what you mean. I grew up middle-class. I was born in 1986. My parents could afford a child, build a home, buy two cars and start a life at my age now, where myself and many of my peers are in the same exact position.
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Old 01-25-2012, 09:23 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 20 days ago)
 
48,284 posts, read 45,576,705 times
Reputation: 15366
Quote:
Originally Posted by knke0204 View Post
I know what you mean. I grew up middle-class. I was born in 1986. My parents could afford a child, build a home, buy two cars and start a life at my age now, where myself and many of my peers are in the same exact position.
And what is even more ironic is this. I went to high school in a suburb that could be considered rural and working class. Many of my classmates already have children, jobs, and cars, and never went to college. I know some people who went to college, graduated, and got good jobs. On the other hand, I am seeing alot more people with college degrees stuck in bad jobs than I thought.
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:52 AM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,995,941 times
Reputation: 2807
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
No, but if the internet existed back then the way it does today, he would definitely have it. He had a very nice car. He bought it off of the lot. I can't afford a car by myself. And with the gas prices the way they are, it doesn't matter. My father had an easier time getting a job at age 25 than I do now, and I have a job.

There was a big recession in the late 70s/early 80s with high unemployment. Also, adjusted for inflation the price of gas back then was the same or higher than today.
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:06 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 20 days ago)
 
48,284 posts, read 45,576,705 times
Reputation: 15366
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
There was a big recession in the late 70s/early 80s with high unemployment. Also, adjusted for inflation the price of gas back then was the same or higher than today.
Still, there is a feeling that my generation will have less than what my parents had.
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Old 01-26-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,242,890 times
Reputation: 1430
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Still, there is a feeling that my generation will have less than what my parents had.
I wouldn't worry too much about it.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:18 PM
 
5,556 posts, read 6,995,941 times
Reputation: 2807
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Still, there is a feeling that my generation will have less than what my parents had.

You are probably correct. As long as the current generation keeps voting the same clowns into political office, nothing will change for the better.
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